Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Make your own GingerBread Lane form of transportation. This year’s GingerBread Lane workshops will take you to the road, track, and water with all of the fixings to design a truly sweet car, boat or train. Each participant will receive a kit with all of the materials that Chef Jon Lovitch uses to create his GingerBread Lane exhibit: gingerbread pieces, icing, and candy.

*$15 per project (NYSCI Members: $10 per project)

Buy Tickets

 
Participants at the November 26 workshop will make a gingerbread house. At all other workshops, participants can create a transportation-themed gingerbread structure: a car, boat or train.

Recommended for ages 4 and older. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Limit of two structures per customer.

Capacity is limited. Please register early to avoid disappointment.

Workshops will be held on:

  • Sunday, November 26; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 2; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Sunday, December 3; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 9; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Sunday, December 10; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 16; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Sunday, December 17; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 23; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Wednesday, December 27; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Thursday, December 28; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Friday, December 29; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 30; 1 pm & 3 pm

*Please note: While this workshop is about building, and not consuming, the gingerbread, icing, and candy provided, we know that it happens and that some people have food allergies. If you or your child has food allergies, please email publicprograms@nysci.org to decide if this workshop is appropriate for you.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Make your own GingerBread Lane form of transportation. This year’s GingerBread Lane workshops will take you to the road, track, and water with all of the fixings to design a truly sweet car, boat or train. Each participant will receive a kit with all of the materials that Chef Jon Lovitch uses to create his GingerBread Lane exhibit: gingerbread pieces, icing, and candy.

*$15 per project (NYSCI Members: $10 per project)

Buy Tickets

 
Participants at the November 26 workshop will make a gingerbread house. At all other workshops, participants can create a transportation-themed gingerbread structure: a car, boat or train.

Recommended for ages 4 and older. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Limit of two structures per customer.

Capacity is limited. Please register early to avoid disappointment.

Workshops will be held on:

  • Sunday, November 26; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 2; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Sunday, December 3; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 9; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Sunday, December 10; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 16; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Sunday, December 17; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 23; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Wednesday, December 27; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Thursday, December 28; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Friday, December 29; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 30; 1 pm & 3 pm

*Please note: While this workshop is about building, and not consuming, the gingerbread, icing, and candy provided, we know that it happens and that some people have food allergies. If you or your child has food allergies, please email publicprograms@nysci.org to decide if this workshop is appropriate for you.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Make your own GingerBread Lane form of transportation. This year’s GingerBread Lane workshops will take you to the road, track, and water with all of the fixings to design a truly sweet car, boat or train. Each participant will receive a kit with all of the materials that Chef Jon Lovitch uses to create his GingerBread Lane exhibit: gingerbread pieces, icing, and candy.

*$15 per project (NYSCI Members: $10 per project)

Buy Tickets

 
Participants at the November 26 workshop will make a gingerbread house. At all other workshops, participants can create a transportation-themed gingerbread structure: a car, boat or train.

Recommended for ages 4 and older. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Limit of two structures per customer.

Capacity is limited. Please register early to avoid disappointment.

Workshops will be held on:

  • Sunday, November 26; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 2; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Sunday, December 3; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 9; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Sunday, December 10; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 16; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Sunday, December 17; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 23; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Wednesday, December 27; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Thursday, December 28; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Friday, December 29; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 30; 1 pm & 3 pm

*Please note: While this workshop is about building, and not consuming, the gingerbread, icing, and candy provided, we know that it happens and that some people have food allergies. If you or your child has food allergies, please email publicprograms@nysci.org to decide if this workshop is appropriate for you.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Make your own GingerBread Lane form of transportation. This year’s GingerBread Lane workshops will take you to the road, track, and water with all of the fixings to design a truly sweet car, boat or train. Each participant will receive a kit with all of the materials that Chef Jon Lovitch uses to create his GingerBread Lane exhibit: gingerbread pieces, icing, and candy.

*$15 per project (NYSCI Members: $10 per project)

Buy Tickets

 
Participants at the November 26 workshop will make a gingerbread house. At all other workshops, participants can create a transportation-themed gingerbread structure: a car, boat or train.

Recommended for ages 4 and older. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Limit of two structures per customer.

Capacity is limited. Please register early to avoid disappointment.

Workshops will be held on:

  • Sunday, November 26; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 2; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Sunday, December 3; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 9; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Sunday, December 10; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 16; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Sunday, December 17; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 23; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Wednesday, December 27; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Thursday, December 28; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Friday, December 29; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 30; 1 pm & 3 pm

*Please note: While this workshop is about building, and not consuming, the gingerbread, icing, and candy provided, we know that it happens and that some people have food allergies. If you or your child has food allergies, please email publicprograms@nysci.org to decide if this workshop is appropriate for you.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Make your own GingerBread Lane form of transportation. This year’s GingerBread Lane workshops will take you to the road, track, and water with all of the fixings to design a truly sweet car, boat or train. Each participant will receive a kit with all of the materials that Chef Jon Lovitch uses to create his GingerBread Lane exhibit: gingerbread pieces, icing, and candy.

*$15 per project (NYSCI Members: $10 per project)

Buy Tickets

 
Participants at the November 26 workshop will make a gingerbread house. At all other workshops, participants can create a transportation-themed gingerbread structure: a car, boat or train.

Recommended for ages 4 and older. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Limit of two structures per customer.

Capacity is limited. Please register early to avoid disappointment.

Workshops will be held on:

  • Sunday, November 26; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 2; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Sunday, December 3; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 9; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Sunday, December 10; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 16; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Sunday, December 17; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 23; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Wednesday, December 27; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Thursday, December 28; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Friday, December 29; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 30; 1 pm & 3 pm

*Please note: While this workshop is about building, and not consuming, the gingerbread, icing, and candy provided, we know that it happens and that some people have food allergies. If you or your child has food allergies, please email publicprograms@nysci.org to decide if this workshop is appropriate for you.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Make your own GingerBread Lane form of transportation. This year’s GingerBread Lane workshops will take you to the road, track, and water with all of the fixings to design a truly sweet car, boat or train. Each participant will receive a kit with all of the materials that Chef Jon Lovitch uses to create his GingerBread Lane exhibit: gingerbread pieces, icing, and candy.

*$15 per project (NYSCI Members: $10 per project)

Buy Tickets

 
Participants at the November 26 workshop will make a gingerbread house. At all other workshops, participants can create a transportation-themed gingerbread structure: a car, boat or train.

Recommended for ages 4 and older. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Limit of two structures per customer.

Capacity is limited. Please register early to avoid disappointment.

Workshops will be held on:

  • Sunday, November 26; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 2; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Sunday, December 3; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 9; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Sunday, December 10; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 16; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Sunday, December 17; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 23; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Wednesday, December 27; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Thursday, December 28; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Friday, December 29; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 30; 1 pm & 3 pm

*Please note: While this workshop is about building, and not consuming, the gingerbread, icing, and candy provided, we know that it happens and that some people have food allergies. If you or your child has food allergies, please email publicprograms@nysci.org to decide if this workshop is appropriate for you.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Make your own GingerBread Lane form of transportation. This year’s GingerBread Lane workshops will take you to the road, track, and water with all of the fixings to design a truly sweet car, boat or train. Each participant will receive a kit with all of the materials that Chef Jon Lovitch uses to create his GingerBread Lane exhibit: gingerbread pieces, icing, and candy.

*$15 per project (NYSCI Members: $10 per project)

Buy Tickets

 
Participants at the November 26 workshop will make a gingerbread house. At all other workshops, participants can create a transportation-themed gingerbread structure: a car, boat or train.

Recommended for ages 4 and older. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Limit of two structures per customer.

Capacity is limited. Please register early to avoid disappointment.

Workshops will be held on:

  • Sunday, November 26; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 2; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Sunday, December 3; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 9; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Sunday, December 10; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 16; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Sunday, December 17; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 23; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Wednesday, December 27; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Thursday, December 28; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Friday, December 29; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 30; 1 pm & 3 pm

*Please note: While this workshop is about building, and not consuming, the gingerbread, icing, and candy provided, we know that it happens and that some people have food allergies. If you or your child has food allergies, please email publicprograms@nysci.org to decide if this workshop is appropriate for you.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Make your own GingerBread Lane form of transportation. This year’s GingerBread Lane workshops will take you to the road, track, and water with all of the fixings to design a truly sweet car, boat or train. Each participant will receive a kit with all of the materials that Chef Jon Lovitch uses to create his GingerBread Lane exhibit: gingerbread pieces, icing, and candy.

*$15 per project (NYSCI Members: $10 per project)

Buy Tickets

 
Participants at the November 26 workshop will make a gingerbread house. At all other workshops, participants can create a transportation-themed gingerbread structure: a car, boat or train.

Recommended for ages 4 and older. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Limit of two structures per customer.

Capacity is limited. Please register early to avoid disappointment.

Workshops will be held on:

  • Sunday, November 26; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 2; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Sunday, December 3; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 9; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Sunday, December 10; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 16; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Sunday, December 17; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 23; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Wednesday, December 27; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Thursday, December 28; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Friday, December 29; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 30; 1 pm & 3 pm

*Please note: While this workshop is about building, and not consuming, the gingerbread, icing, and candy provided, we know that it happens and that some people have food allergies. If you or your child has food allergies, please email publicprograms@nysci.org to decide if this workshop is appropriate for you.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Make your own GingerBread Lane form of transportation. This year’s GingerBread Lane workshops will take you to the road, track, and water with all of the fixings to design a truly sweet car, boat or train. Each participant will receive a kit with all of the materials that Chef Jon Lovitch uses to create his GingerBread Lane exhibit: gingerbread pieces, icing, and candy.

*$15 per project (NYSCI Members: $10 per project)

Buy Tickets

 
Participants at the November 26 workshop will make a gingerbread house. At all other workshops, participants can create a transportation-themed gingerbread structure: a car, boat or train.

Recommended for ages 4 and older. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Limit of two structures per customer.

Capacity is limited. Please register early to avoid disappointment.

Workshops will be held on:

  • Sunday, November 26; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 2; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Sunday, December 3; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 9; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Sunday, December 10; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 16; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Sunday, December 17; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 23; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Wednesday, December 27; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Thursday, December 28; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Friday, December 29; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 30; 1 pm & 3 pm

*Please note: While this workshop is about building, and not consuming, the gingerbread, icing, and candy provided, we know that it happens and that some people have food allergies. If you or your child has food allergies, please email publicprograms@nysci.org to decide if this workshop is appropriate for you.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Make your own GingerBread Lane form of transportation. This year’s GingerBread Lane workshops will take you to the road, track, and water with all of the fixings to design a truly sweet car, boat or train. Each participant will receive a kit with all of the materials that Chef Jon Lovitch uses to create his GingerBread Lane exhibit: gingerbread pieces, icing, and candy.

*$15 per project (NYSCI Members: $10 per project)

Buy Tickets

 
Participants at the November 26 workshop will make a gingerbread house. At all other workshops, participants can create a transportation-themed gingerbread structure: a car, boat or train.

Recommended for ages 4 and older. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Limit of two structures per customer.

Capacity is limited. Please register early to avoid disappointment.

Workshops will be held on:

  • Sunday, November 26; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 2; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Sunday, December 3; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 9; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Sunday, December 10; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 16; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Sunday, December 17; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 23; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Wednesday, December 27; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Thursday, December 28; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Friday, December 29; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 30; 1 pm & 3 pm

*Please note: While this workshop is about building, and not consuming, the gingerbread, icing, and candy provided, we know that it happens and that some people have food allergies. If you or your child has food allergies, please email publicprograms@nysci.org to decide if this workshop is appropriate for you.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Make your own GingerBread Lane form of transportation. This year’s GingerBread Lane workshops will take you to the road, track, and water with all of the fixings to design a truly sweet car, boat or train. Each participant will receive a kit with all of the materials that Chef Jon Lovitch uses to create his GingerBread Lane exhibit: gingerbread pieces, icing, and candy.

*$15 per project (NYSCI Members: $10 per project)

Buy Tickets

 
Participants at the November 26 workshop will make a gingerbread house. At all other workshops, participants can create a transportation-themed gingerbread structure: a car, boat or train.

Recommended for ages 4 and older. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Limit of two structures per customer.

Capacity is limited. Please register early to avoid disappointment.

Workshops will be held on:

  • Sunday, November 26; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 2; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Sunday, December 3; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 9; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Sunday, December 10; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 16; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Sunday, December 17; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 23; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Wednesday, December 27; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Thursday, December 28; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Friday, December 29; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 30; 1 pm & 3 pm

*Please note: While this workshop is about building, and not consuming, the gingerbread, icing, and candy provided, we know that it happens and that some people have food allergies. If you or your child has food allergies, please email publicprograms@nysci.org to decide if this workshop is appropriate for you.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Hey everyone!

Welcome to our Little Buddy tutorial! Little Buddies are a great way to learn the basics of hand sewing. Little Buddies also make great gifts, because who doesn’t love receiving a wonderful hand-made present? Making a Little Buddy doesn’t take too long and uses everyday materials that you may already have at home. Here’s a list of the materials that you’ll need:

  • Fabric (about 1 sq. foot)
  • Fabric scissors
  • Fabric markers
  • Dull #6 Needles and thread
  • Stuffing
  • Buttons (optional)
  • Pins (optional)

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Once you have gathered your materials you can get started!

 

Step 1

Start by deciding what you want to make.

 

Step 2

Fold the fabric in half and draw an outline of your chosen buddy.

In this example, I’m making a bunny.
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Step 3

Next cut out the shape that you drew about 1/2 in outside of the line while keeping both halves of the fabric together. Pin if necessary.
 

Step 4

Take the thread and measure from the tip on your right fingers to the tip of your left shoulder and cut. Thread the needle and make a knot on one end. Leave the other end of the thread about 2 inches shorter than the end of the knot.

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Now we’re ready to start sewing! There are different kinds of stitches but today, we’ll be using one called the whip stitch. It’s simple and it’s good for this kind of project because it will help hold the stuffing inside of the finished little buddy.
Note: the side that we are working on is the inside of the little buddy.

 

Step 5

Start at the bottom right of the fabric. Push the needle up from the underside and through both layers of the fabric. Then pull the thread all the way until the knot is underneath the fabric. This is one stitch. Notice that the other end of the thread is loose. If you hold the fabric and pull the needle, the thread will come off the needle so make sure you don’t pull too hard after every stitch.

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Step 6

For the next stitch, place the tip of the needle about half an inch to the right of the original stitch and push the needle up. Again, pull the thread all the way until the stitch is secure. Keep an eye on the loose end of the thread to make sure it does not unravel.

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Step 7

Repeat this sewing technique until you’re about halfway around the entire little buddy. Remember to always start the stitch by pushing it from the underside up.

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Now that you’re halfway there, it is a good time to add any designs or decorations you want. Adding things like buttons once it’s already stuffed is possible but more difficult.

 

Step 8

If you wish to add buttons, add some thread on another needle and tie both ends into a knot. Take the fabric, separate the layers, and turn it inside out.

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Step 9

Position the buttons the way you would like for them to go. Hold one of the buttons in place with your hand. Separate the layers once again and push the needle with the new thread from the underside of the top layer all the way through one of the holes in the button.

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Step 10

Push the needle back down through a different hole in the button. Make sure it’s only the top layer of fabric. Repeat up and down motion until the button is secure in place.

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Step 11

In order to tie off the thread, hold the fabric on the underside of the button. Push the needle through the fabric as shown. Pull the thread most of the way through.

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You’ll notice a loop that is formed. Pull the needle through that loop, tighten, and cut the thread.

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Repeat steps 9 and 11 with each button.

 

Step 12

Once all of the buttons are in place turn the fabric inside out once again. It is time to keep sewing around the fabric. Leave a hole on the bottom in order to add the stuffing before closing it up.

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Step 13

Turn the fabric inside out once more. The buttons should be on the outside now. Fill the inside with the stuffing.

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Step 14

Finally, it’s time to close up the fabric. Make a knot at the end, the way we did with the buttons to avoid any unraveling.

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Step 15

Now that your Little Buddy is complete, we can add and decorations! And we’re done! Now you can show your Little Buddy off or give it away as a gift!

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If you make something share it with us! Tag @nysci on Twitter and Instagram. We can’t wait to see what you’ve created.

Until next time,

– Annalise.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Make your own GingerBread Lane form of transportation. This year’s GingerBread Lane workshops will take you to the road, track, and water with all of the fixings to design a truly sweet car, boat or train. Each participant will receive a kit with all of the materials that Chef Jon Lovitch uses to create his GingerBread Lane exhibit: gingerbread pieces, icing, and candy.

*$15 per project (NYSCI Members: $10 per project)

Buy Tickets

 
Participants at the November 26 workshop will make a gingerbread house. At all other workshops, participants can create a transportation-themed gingerbread structure: a car, boat or train.

Recommended for ages 4 and older. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Limit of two structures per customer.

Capacity is limited. Please register early to avoid disappointment.

Workshops will be held on:

  • Sunday, November 26; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 2; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Sunday, December 3; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 9; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Sunday, December 10; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 16; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Sunday, December 17; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 23; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Wednesday, December 27; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Thursday, December 28; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Friday, December 29; 1 pm & 3 pm
  • Saturday, December 30; 1 pm & 3 pm

*Please note: While this workshop is about building, and not consuming, the gingerbread, icing, and candy provided, we know that it happens and that some people have food allergies. If you or your child has food allergies, please email publicprograms@nysci.org to decide if this workshop is appropriate for you.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Explore the museum’s exhibits through the eyes of scientists. Ask questions, collect data, uncover patterns, and design and create your very own exhibit.

Recommended for children ages 5 – 8 years old and their families.

Thursdays, October 5 – November 16, 2017, 3:30 – 5:30 pm

Light dinner will be provided after each workshop.
Participation in all seven workshops is required.

To register and for more information, call 718-683-9366 or email
dmeza@nysci.org. Preregistration is required.

 
Here’s a look at our last Museum Makers workshop:
Museum Makers 2017

 

This program is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1614663.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

We have been playing around with linkages the last few weeks in Maker Space, and have gotten a few questions from families about how they could make their own. It turns out that linkages are a wonderful activity for tinkering at home because they are so easy to make with simple, easily accessible materials.

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The first thing you will need is cardboard, as much as you can get. We recommend re-using cardboard boxes from online purchases or pizza deliveries. Then you will need to get a few tools: a box cutter (a grown up to lend a hand), something to cut on like a cutting mat (or even another piece of cardboard), a ruler and pencil.

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Measure out 1.25 inch strips on your cardboard and start cutting! Your strips dont have to be perfect, so just focus on using that box cutter correctly (cut across from yourself, not towards!).

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As a side note, cardboard has corrugation (those waves between the top and bottom of the cardboard sheet) and we have found that our cardboard linkages are stronger when we cut down with the waves instead of across them. You do not have to cut with the corrugation though!  Your linkages will work fine either way you make them.

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Then you are going to want to punch some holes in your strips. Generally, we just punch the holes where and when we need them, but you can pre-punch holes if you are working with younger makers. Don’t worry about making the holes uniform or evenly spaced, we actually think linkages look better when they are asymmetrical. To create the holes we use an awl, but really any sharp pointy object will work, like a sharpened pencil, a screwdriver, or a cheap pen. To punch the holes safely we put a piece of foam underneath the cardboard so kids don’t have to worry about poking their hands or the tables. You could also use sponges or big stiff bristled brushes.

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The last piece of the puzzle is brass fasteners or brads. You can buy these online, or from any office supply, art, or stationary store in a variety of sizes. We recommend 1/2 inch, 3/4 inch, or 1 inch.

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Now we are ready to create some linkages! To start making the simplest linkage, an “X”, put a brass fastener through the holes in two cardboard strips and fold the legs out to secure it in place. Repeat this two more times and then connect your X’s end to end. Moving the first two links will cause a chain reaction causing all the other links to move too!

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After that try and experiment with squares, and asymmetrical linkages. By adding some simple crafting supplies like scissors, markers, colorful paper, and tape you can create fun mechanical toys ranging from grabber-arms to beautiful butterflies.

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For more inspiration check out the Tinkering Studio and the Moving Toys Workshop.

 

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Explore the museum’s exhibits through the eyes of scientists. Ask questions, collect data, uncover patterns, and design and create your very own exhibit.

Recommended for children ages 5 – 8 years old and their families.

Thursdays, October 5 – November 16, 2017, 3:30 – 5:30 pm

Light dinner will be provided after each workshop.
Participation in all seven workshops is required.

To register and for more information, call 718-683-9366 or email
dmeza@nysci.org. Preregistration is required.

 
Here’s a look at our last Museum Makers workshop:
Museum Makers 2017

 

This program is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1614663.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Explore the museum’s exhibits through the eyes of scientists. Ask questions, collect data, uncover patterns, and design and create your very own exhibit.

Recommended for children ages 5 – 8 years old and their families.

Thursdays, October 5 – November 16, 2017, 3:30 – 5:30 pm

Light dinner will be provided after each workshop.
Participation in all seven workshops is required.

To register and for more information, call 718-683-9366 or email
dmeza@nysci.org. Preregistration is required.

 
Here’s a look at our last Museum Makers workshop:
Museum Makers 2017

 

This program is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1614663.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Whether stacking blocks to construct a model city, designing ways to preserve leaves found on the way to school, or lining up by height in the classroom, children demonstrate a clear readiness to engage in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) learning early in life. While early childhood educators are often excited about supporting STEM learning, they aren’t always aware of all the STEM opportunities that can be cultivated in the things they already do with young children inside and outside the classroom.

To address this, NYSCI and Bank Street College of Education are collaborating with teams of educators from P.S. 28 and P.S. 330 in Queens to pilot the “Active STEM Learning in the Early Childhood Classroom” professional development program. As we embark on this new partnership, here’s three things that we hope our school partners take away from this experience.

 

Recognizing STEM Learning in the Everyday

A major goal of this project is to provide early childhood educators with opportunities for noticing the STEM learning that is already happening in their classrooms. Anytime students are asking and answering their own questions, imagining solutions to problems, or exploring the properties of materials, there is a foundation for STEM learning. Throughout this project, NYSCI and Bank Street coaches will guide our school partners in observing their students and reflecting on these observations. Participants will use a newly developed observation tool that we hope will give them a new “lens” for looking at their students’ thinking. Through observation and reflection, we’ll start to identify moments when students are already engaging in STEM thinking in order to build off these successes to provide additional contexts for STEM learning.

 

New Ideas for Familiar Materials

Many people think STEM requires specialized tools or constant access to digital technology, but even the simplest materials can foster deep thinking. During the guided classroom observations, as well as a series of hands-on workshops at NYSCI, we’ll be exploring different uses for materials that are readily available in early childhood classrooms. Something as simple as paper can be used to construct a model house, create a glider, or make a shadow scene. By thinking about how we invite students to explore the properties of materials and consider how these properties can affect the way we use these materials, we’re able to find new life in materials we use every day.

 

Increased Collaboration at Multiple Levels

Not only is this project a collaboration between NYSCI, Bank Street, and our partner schools, we’re also hoping to increase collaboration across school teams. Each school team consists of two kindergarten teachers, two first grade teachers, and one science cluster teacher. In many early childhood settings, there is limited time and support for collaboration among classroom teachers and science specialists. Through this project, we hope to provide our partners with space and resources needed to create an increased culture of collaboration that lasts after the project has ended.

As the project continues throughout this academic year, we’ll use future posts to share what we’re learning from one another, including strategies and tools that we hope other educators can use to support the active STEM learning in their own early childhood classrooms.

Dorothy Bennett and Michaela Labriole.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

We’ve been experimenting with zip line racers in the Maker Space this week, trying out different body size configurations, wings, flaps and rubber bands. To conserve materials (yay environment!) we kept this a make and take-apart program, but we’ve had lots of “how-to” requests from visitors and since we aim to please. Just a note, this activity was inspired by the fine work of Lance from the Young Engineers Workshop. You can learn more on instructables, as well as check out his other great projects.

First, you’ll need to gather your materials. The “standard” zip line racer body that Lance designed uses five popsicle sticks, but you can add more or try less as you get comfortable with designing. You’ll also need a rubber band powered propeller which you can easily find online and in hobby shops, 1 paper clip (the kind without the notches in them), 2 small or medium binder clips, a rubber band, masking tape, hot glue, some paper or cardstock and cord for the zip line (we used nylon but fishing line or any other monofilament type cord will do).

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Materials:
  • Popsicle sticks (as few as 3 would work, these instructions use 5)
  • Rubber band powered propeller
  • 2 small or medium binder clips
  • 1 Paper clip
  • Rubber Band
  • Hot Glue
  • Tape
  • Scrap Paper
  • Cord for the zip line (we used about 20 feet)

You’ll want to start by making the body of your zip line racer. Lay out two popsicle sticks end to end on a protected work surface.

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Apply a strip of hot glue down the length of the third popsicle stick and center it as best you can on the two sticks on the table. This will make sure your body is nice and strong and can withstand the torque from the rubber band.

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Next you need to partially unfold the paper clip. The easiest way to do this is to hold the big part between your thumb and index finger on one hand, and pinch the little inside part with your thumb and index finger on the other and pull down slightly until you’ve made an “L” shape out of the bend.

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Add some glue to one end of your racer’s body and place one half of the paper clip firmly on top of it. Add another dab of glue over the metal, just to make sure it’s really secure. This will be the hook that holds your rubber band taught.

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While that’s drying add a small dot of hot glue to either side of the center support stick. This is where you’ll glue your racer uprights.

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Place one popsicle stick on each glue dot, trying to keep them as straight as possible (you want them perpendicular to the body).

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After all the hot glue is dry you need to apply some masking tape to the paper clip/hot glue joint. This keeps the paper clip secure and stops the rubber band from ripping the hook off the end of your racer. A small three inch piece will do. Just wrap it around your paperclip and the popsicle stick, making sure not to accidentally tape the paperclip closed.

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Next, you need to add the propeller and the rubberband. Attach the propeller at the end opposite the paper clip, making sure the little metal loop is hanging down away from the uprights.

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Hook your rubber band on the propeller and stretch it back to the paperclip hook and attach it there as well. You’re almost done!

Finally, you’re going to need some drag in order to get your racer going. Use your piece of paper to create wings or some interesting shape (give it some flair!) or, just cut it into a rectangle like I did. Span it between the two uprights and tape it on.

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Add the two small binder clips to the tops of the uprights, these will be the “hooks” that grab on to the line.

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You’re now ready to race!

Place your zip line somewhere high enough that it’s relatively safely out of the way, but low enough that you can still reach it (even if that means you’re using a stepstool). You want your line to be tight so your racer doesn’t have to fight the slack. Ours is about twenty feet long but you can make yours as long as you’d like.

To get your racer to fly you need to wind up the band. With the propeller facing you, wind it clockwise (to the right) until you have a double coil on the band. You can see the difference between a single and double coil in the images below.

 
Single Coil
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Double Coil
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Hang your racer on the line using the two binder clips. You’ll want to hold the propeller with one hand while you open the clips over the line and clip them onto the uprights.

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Give it a little slide to make sure your racer is hanging freely. When you’re ready to race, hold it by the propeller between your thumb and index finger. Then, just open up your fingers (without pulling down on the racer) and watch it fly!

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Now that you know the basics you can experiment with different body sizes, rubber bands, wing/drag configurations and anything else you can really think of.

We hung two zip lines (one over the other) to set up a race track type environment. In order to keep this fair, the lines need to be at the same angle, and the racers have to be started evenly. Build one with a friend or a family member and see whose goes further or faster!

 

Other challenges to try

Add a load! Create a device to carry a load (a basket or a tray, or even just a seat) and add someone/thing to go along for the ride. I’m partial to plastic dinosaurs, but you can be as creative as you like with this. Can your racer carry its passenger to the other end safely? Will it have enough momentum? Try it out and see!

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Try putting your zip line at an angle and see what type of racer is able to go the highest. (Note: this will be much harder to do if you’re using fishing line as the friction between the clips and the line will be next to nil and the racers will want to slide back down. Hooray for gravity!)

Try smaller and larger racer bodies and see what works best.

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Reverse engineer! Try a racer with the propeller in back instead of in front. Does this make a difference? How would you have to change your design to make this work as well as the front facing propeller?

Check out what our visitors have made on our Instagram @makerspace and add your creations too! Let us know if you come up with any other creative challenges and keep making!

Until next time, happy flying!

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– Annalise

 

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Explore the museum’s exhibits through the eyes of scientists. Ask questions, collect data, uncover patterns, and design and create your very own exhibit.

Recommended for children ages 5 – 8 years old and their families.

Thursdays, October 5 – November 16, 2017, 3:30 – 5:30 pm

Light dinner will be provided after each workshop.
Participation in all seven workshops is required.

To register and for more information, call 718-683-9366 or email
dmeza@nysci.org. Preregistration is required.

 
Here’s a look at our last Museum Makers workshop:
Museum Makers 2017

 

This program is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1614663.