Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

The seventh annual Mamas Expo by the Mamas Network offers parents information, samples, local resources and kid-friendly activities.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Celebrate Earth Day at NYSCI! Reuse, recycle and rethink how to respond to climate change. Take part in hands-on activities, learn how personal choices impact the climate, and come up with solutions and strategies to combat climate change.

 

Rethink and respond to climate change with these hands-on activities in Design Lab.

  • Emergency Structures – Climate change is leading to more frequent extreme weather events. Engineer a structure using dowels and rubber bands that can fit you and your family and can keep you safe through a storm.
  • Tote Bag Screen Printing – Customize your own tote bag by adding your own screen-printed design and learn about ways to reduce your waste.
  • Urban Planning in Empty Spaces with CUSP – Climate change is expected to bring hotter summers and more severe rainfall events to New York City. Act as an urban planner to redesign a vacant lot while considering different solution strategies.
  • Recycled Animation – Tell a story about the environment by directing your own stop motion sequence.

The Climate & Urban Systems Partnership (CUSP) is a group of organizations and individuals dedicated to climate change education through local and relevant solutions.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Event Description:
6:30 pm: Wine Reception
7 – 8:30 pm: Moderated Discussion and Q&A
 
Why has this topic been so difficult to address? What are the current priorities for communicating about climate change? What can we expect from the current administration on climate policy and research? What can we all be doing to support efforts to make the kind of change we want?
 
On the eve of Earth Day, join the NYSCI in Manhattan, and meet three pairs of artists and scientists who have created new artworks about current climate change research. These works, currently on view at ARTech (a free, pop-up activity center for children hosted by Meatpacking Business Improvement District, through April 29) present the perfect inspiration and platform for diving into an honest and timely conversation about the imperative and challenges of communication about climate change. Led by Reply All’s senior reporter, Sruthi Pinnamaneni, this conversation will cover many climate change angles.
 
Limited capacity. Ages 21 and older.
 
This event will be held in lower Manhattan. Those who R.S.V.P. will receive an email with the exact address.

 

About ARTech
NYSCI commissioned three artworks during 2016 as part of the ACCESS project, an annual exhibition series that fosters collaborations between visual artists and scientists in order to make themes from NYSCI exhibits accessible in new ways, for multiple publics. ACCESS 2016 focused on the ideas explored in NYSCI’s newest exhibition, Connected Worlds: ecology, connected systems, sustainability and climate change. Each artist was paired with a scientist to bring a unique, collaborative view of scientific research, making the research more accessible and inviting to museum-goers. Artists and scientists worked together over a six-month period, with resulting works taking the form of a 3D animation, an immersive video installation, and an interactive installation/performance, presented at NYSCI: November 19, 2016 – January 29, 2017, and at ARTech: March 1 – April 28, 2017.

ARTech is a partnership between NYSCI the Meatpacking Business Improvement District (BID) and the Children’s Museum of the Arts. The Meatpacking BID has generously offered to support this event.

 

About the Panelists
Moderator:
Sruthi Pinnamaneni is a producer and reporter at Gimlet Media’s Reply All. She graduated from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism with honors, while assisting at the BBC-NY Bureau and a documentary production company, where she worked on the award-winning feature film, Kumare. As the audio/video correspondent at The Economist, Sruthi worked on political stories and traveled between cities and villages in India to produce an Economist video series on rural education and the informal economy in slums. Sruthi has worked on radio stories that have aired at various shows, including Reply All, Love + Radio, Studio 360, Radiolab, Marketplace, Freakonomics, Transistor, and The Splendid Table. She won the 2013 PRX STEM grant, supported by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, and the Science Media Award for best radio story in 2014.

 

Artist/Scientist Pair #1:
Coche Gonzalez is a freelance TD/Compositor who has collaborated with various studios in the production of museum exhibitions, commercial animations and film effects. He has also taught at Pratt Institute, Columbia University and the Parsons School of Design, and he cofounded the New York City design studio SOFTlab.

Jack Tseng is a paleontologist with interests in both field-based and laboratory-based research on the fossil record of carnivorous mammals. He has led or participated in dozens of fossil digs in California, Utah, Wyoming, Mexico, Taiwan, Inner Mongolia and Tibet.

 

Artist/Scientist Pair #2:
Laura Chipley is a Queens-based artist who uses video, site-specific interventions and emerging technologies to explore potentials for human collaboration and to document the social and environmental impacts of energy extraction.

Hannah Zanowski has her Ph.D. in physical oceanography in the Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences Program at Princeton University. Her research explores the impacts of Antarctic open-ocean polynyas (vast regions of open water in the sea ice) on abyssal ocean properties and circulation.

 

Artist/Scientist Pair #3:
Carrie Dashow is a New York City-based artist working at the intersection of video, performance and visual arts. Her often-participatory work examines the undercurrents of authority, subjectivity and an indebted relationship to location.

S. Matthew Liao is a philosopher interested in a wide range of issues including ethics, epistemology, metaphysics, moral psychology and bioethics. He is director and associate professor of the Center for Bioethics, and affiliated professor in the department of philosophy at New York University.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Celebrate Earth Day at NYSCI! Reuse, recycle and rethink how to respond to climate change. Take part in hands-on activities, learn how personal choices impact the climate, and come up with solutions and strategies to combat climate change.
 
This event continues on April 22

 

Take part in fun, family friendly activities to learn more about climate change and find ways to respond.

  • Extreme Events – Explore the impact that green infrastructure has on managing water runoff in the face of extreme events.
  • Empty Spaces – Act as landscape architects to redesign a vacant lot while considering different solution strategies.
  • Hidden Cost Café – Explore the carbon footprints of your favorite foods.
  • Hot Spots – Explore differences in surface temperatures of locations across the city and discuss solutions to keep New York City cool.
  • Get to the Game – Explore the carbon footprint of their game-day food and transportation choices.
  • Choices in your Neighborhood – Identify which green energy choices are available in their neighborhood by stacking different colored legos on a map.
  • Digital Map – Upload stories, videos, data and pictures related to climate change impacts or programs in your neighborhood and see what your friends and neighbors are sharing.

The Climate & Urban Systems Partnership (CUSP) is a group of organizations and individuals dedicated to climate change education through local and relevant solutions.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Do you have a passion for helping the environment? Join us for STEM Night: Conservation and Energy to explore the wide range of opportunities in conservation, energy and environmental science.

Hear from guest speakers, engage in hands-on activities, and learn about different ways you can help save our planet.

 

STEM Professionals and Organizations (with more to be added):

  • Con Edison
  • Hunter College
  • The Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers
  • The Museum of Interesting Things
  • NYU Tandon School of Engineering
  • SUNY Maritime College
  • The Lowline
  •  

    RSVP required.

     

    Get Involved
    STEM professionals interested in sharing their experiences with students and joining this event, or educators with student groups who want to attend this event, please contact acanova@nysci.org for more information.

     

    The STEM Night series is a program of NYSCI’s Alan J. Friedman Center for the Development of Young Scientists. 

    Background

    Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

    NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

    NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

    About the Position

    Join us at our special evening event, STEM Night: Using Social Media to Engage in STEM, to learn about the wide range of career opportunities available in social media and how science is communicated through various platforms. At this free event, you can engage in hands-on activities, hear from experts in the field through a panel discussion, and network with STEM professionals.

    RSVP required. 
    Get Involved
    STEM professionals interested in sharing their experiences with students and joining this event, or educators with student groups who want to attend this event, please contact acanova@nysci.org for more information.
    The STEM Night series is a program of NYSCI’s Alan J. Friedman Center for the Development of Young Scientists. 

    Background

    Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

    NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

    NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

    About the Position

    mobile ecosystem

    Our mobile devices can pay bills, deposit checks, connect us with friends in faraway places, provide the latest weather forecast, and make light work of an 800-page book. At this point, it seems that the only thing our digital devices can’t do is save the world. But that’s about to change.

    In a few short years, a new portable experience will be ready to take on one of our society’s most pressing issues: how to balance the needs of various stakeholders in an ecosystem.

    NYSCI’s new mobile application will challenge users to solve problems in a simulated world of playful creatures and vibrant flora. The world will be composed of interconnected ecosystems where players can control the behaviors of creatures to accomplish goals and respond to changes in the health of the habitats. The experience will allow players to work by themselves or join with friends to collaborate or compete.

    Funded by the National Science Foundation and the JPB Foundation, the initiative is a collaborative effort between NYSCI, Columbia University’s Center for International Earth Science Information Network, and Design I/O.

    The application was recently a part of a White House Fact Sheet listing new commitments to President Obama’s Computer Science for All Initiative, a bold plan to give every American student the opportunity to learn computer science.

    Inspired by NYSCI’s Connected Worlds exhibition, the application will get middle school students using the kinds of computational ideas (sequences, loops, variables, conditionals and events) and models that ecologists use to solve problems in environmental science. The goal is to get kids interested in ecology, and ultimately, to use their brainpower to help save our favorite planet.

     


    This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1543144.
    Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

    Background

    Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

    NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

    NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

    About the Position

    Transmissions ebook

    Dengue, zika and chikungunya fever mosquito (aedes aegypti) on human skin

    Zika, Ebola, West Nile virus. In today’s global, hyper-connected world, identifying emerging diseases requires scientists who not only have the skills and experience to gather evidence and conduct research, but also who have the persistence to continue their research in the face of a variety of obstacles.

    Using lessons learned from persistent work done by a veterinary pathologist who helped identify West Nile Virus in 1999, NYSCI is creating an interactive comic ebook for middle school and high school students. The comic book will use a fictional storyline about five 9th graders. They work to investigate a mysterious disease, collect evidence, meet with scientists, and even time travel. The ebook aims to demystify how humans can get diseases that also infect birds and other animals.

    The Transmissions ebook will be available to the public in 2018 and is funded by a prestigious Science Education Partnership Award (SEPA) from the National Institutes of Health.

     

    This project was made possible by a Science Education Partnership Award (SEPA), Grant Number 1R25OD021906-01, from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

    Research reported in this publication was supported by the Office Of The Director, National Institutes Of Health of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number R25OD021906. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

    Background

    Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

    NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

    NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

    About the Position

    The new iBook, Wild Minds: What Animals Really Think, is now available for free on the iBooks store. Based on NYSCI’s Wild Minds exhibition, the iBook explores the cognitive abilities of animals.

    The iBook includes interactives, videos and case studies, taking readers on a journey of discovery where they encounter surprising and impressive thinking skills in a variety of animals.

    Written by Martin Weiss, Wild Minds: What Animals Really Think is recommended for grades 5 – 12. Download it for free now!

    Background

    Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

    NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

    NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

    About the Position

    Teachers looking for Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) resources now have 17 new options to choose from. The Teacher TryScience website now features a growing set of resources that demonstrate how existing K-12 science lessons can be evaluated and revised to more closely align to the NGSS, using the Educators Evaluating Quality in Instructional Products (EQuIP) rubric. Using the EQuIP process, NYSCI educators have revised existing lessons, making them more rigorous, engaging, and ultimately more informative for teachers.

    Through a partnership supported by IBM, NYSCI and Achieve, the nonprofit organization that helped develop NGSS, began collaborating on the lessons in 2014. The free lessons, designed for students in late elementary through high school, cover topics as varied as air pollution, solar design, food packaging, wind power and biodiversity. Along with the lessons, EQuIP Rubrics, outlines and other materials are also available. Lessons are also aligned with the Common Core Standards for Mathematics (CCSM) and the Common Core Standards for English Language Arts (ELA).

    The lessons and supporting materials can be downloaded for free at teacherstryscience.com/ngsslanding.

    Background

    Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

    NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

    NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

    About the Position

    Part baby expo, part county fair, and part something entirely different, the Mamas Expo is a two day family friendly gathering that celebrates parenting culture in New York City and beyond. It brings together local resources, businesses, brands, educators, caretakers, parents, grandparents, performers, artists and kids to receive an exclusive look at all of the new resources available and of course, have fun!

    Activities include cool crafts, balloon twisting, face painting, play spaces, mini massages, snack samples and a picnic area. Parents can learn about all things parenting including great products, local services, child care, classes and camps, things to do with children, financial security options, and health and nutrition services.

    Saturday, June 13: Expecting Families and Babies

    Additional highlights on Saturday focus on the youngest members of your family. Learn about maternity and baby wear at the Wee Babe pop-up baby store with baby product expert Selina Aquino, and get the facts on prenatal health and baby nutrition.

    Sunday, June 14: Ages 2 and Up

    Activities on Sunday focus on toddlers and older children with additional crafts, potty training products and tips, cool games and learning products, play spaces, after-school classes, preKs and party places. Kids can make their own bubble tool in the free Little Makers workshop, Bubble Trouble, from 10:30 am – 12:30 pm.

    The MAMAS Day Bag

    This year, MAMAS is introducing a new MAMAS Day Bag, a funky cloth bag filled with snacks, beverages, handy wipes and everyday necessities and accessories that make urban parenting a little easier. The first 200 families to arrive each day at the Mamas Expo 2015 will receive a free MAMAS Day Bag.

    Entry is free with NYSCI admission. To join the conversation online, use #TheMamasExpo.

    Background

    Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

    NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

    NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

    About the Position

    A consortium of science centers, led by NYSCI, has launched learnXdesign, a website for the informal learning community.

    The website, learnxdesign.org, contains more than 30 hands-on activities for use by educators in a variety of out-of-school settings, including after-school programs, libraries and youth clubs. Activities focus on design-based learning, a model of learning where students are presented with a challenge that requires them to actively engage in the learning process by creating hypotheses, experimenting and drawing conclusions. Current activities available on the site include shadow puppets, paper circuits and microbots.

    NYSCI partnered with six science and technology museums to create learnXdesign – the Center of Science and Industry in Columbus, Ohio; Explora in Albuquerque, N.M.; the Museum of Science in Boston, Mass.; the Science Museum of Minnesota in Minneapolis; The Tech Museum of Innovation in San Jose, Calif.; and TELUS Spark Science Centre in Calgary, Canada. Web development was provided by the Lawrence Hall of Science in Berkeley, Calif. Funding for the project was provided through a generous grant from the Noyce Foundation.

    Although intended primarily for the after-school community, learnXdesign activities can be accessed by anyone and are available for free as pdf downloads at learnxdesign.org.

    Background

    Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

    NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

    NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

    About the Position

    NYSCI, along with partners at Binghamton University, The Network Science Center at West Point, and University of Oxford, is proud to announce the publication of a groundbreaking document: Network Literacy: Essential Concepts and Core Ideas.

    Network-Literacy-coverAs our world becomes increasingly connected through the use of networks that allow instantaneous communication and the spread of information, the degree of people’s understanding of how these networks work will play a major role in determining how much society will benefit from this heightened connectivity. In short, a networked society requires network literacy: basic knowledge about how networks can be used as a tool for discovery and decision-making, and about both their potential benefits and pitfalls, made accessible for all people living in today’s networked world. Moreover, because even young children interact with networks all day, every day, it is important that network literacy begins at a young age, and because networks are present in all aspects of contemporary life, the consideration of networks should be reflected throughout teaching practice in a cross-disciplinary manner. Yet despite the importance and ubiquity of networks, the study of networks is absent from current educational systems.

    This brochure provides an initial step toward facilitating the development of network literacy. It states basic ideas for the study of networks in plain language, presenting seven essential concepts and more detailed core ideas that are described in a concise manner. It can be used by everyone for teaching and learning. This work was developed iteratively and collaboratively by a community of scientists and practitioners who develop and use the cutting-edge science of networks. It was designed by NYSCI Explainer Eri Yamamoto.

    DOWNLOAD HERE

    Background

    Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

    NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

    NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

    About the Position

    Makers are everywhere. They are children, adults, students, teachers, toddlers and teenagers—anyone who creates and makes things that interest them.

    A makerspace is a place where people make things. It can be anywhere—in a kitchen, warehouse, garage or even a bedroom.

    Click the images below to download the latest three-part makerspace inspiration zine produced by NYSCI, with generous support from The Walt Disney Company, and free for you to use and share. So get making!

    Download: We Are All Makers
    Download: Tools
    Download: Projects

    Make Academy – Dylan from NYSCI on Vimeo.

    Make Academy – India from NYSCI on Vimeo.

    Make Academy – Samantha from NYSCI on Vimeo.

    Background

    Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

    NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

    NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

    About the Position

    A paper describing the success of the project NetSci High is now published as part of the proceedings for the 6th Workshop on Complex Networks (CompleNet), which will be held at NYSCI in March 2015. NYSCI is a partner in NetSci High, a project funded by NSF that connects high school students from Title 1 NYC schools with research labs to work on independent Network Science research projects. The paper can be read in its entirety here.

    Background

    Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

    NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

    NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

    About the Position

    On September 20 and 21, NYSCI hosted the 5th annual World Maker Faire New York, our biggest annual event. Described as the greatest show and tell show on earth, there were over 800 exhibits, presentations, and performances by Makers and over 85,000 visitors.

    This year at the SciPlay booth in NYSCI Village, we showed off two of our digital apps: GeniGames and Picture Dots.

    sciplay_genigames

    SciPlay GeniGames play at World Maker Faire 2014.

    sciplay_picturedots

    SciPlay Picture Dot app testing at World Maker Faire 2014.

    GeniGames, an online game that allows kids to explore genetics concepts by breeding and studying dragons, had kids of all ages at Maker Faire stop by to play. GeniGames curriculum and support material for high school Living Environment teachers, will be posted online soon.

    Picture Dots is an iPad app that has been developed at NYSCI and is geared to our young learners, ages two to six. Still currently under development, it allows children to take pictures and label them with interactive dots that are assigned meaning through color, musical tones, text and sound effects. We’ll be posting updates on this app and invite families to test and help develop Picture Dots.

    A special thanks to our SciPlay staff Harouna, Laura, Alyssa, Talya, Ruth, and our volunteers, Claire, Jackie, and Katie and NYSCI Explainers for their help at the booth.

    Want to know what SciPlay has in the works? Stay tuned to our blog for sneak peeks and official news. Have questions? Contact us here.

     

    GeniGames   PictureDots

    Background

    Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

    NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

    NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

    About the Position

    SciPlay invited 18 New York City middle school science teachers to take part in the SciPlay Summer Institute at NYSCI in August 2014. The goal was to explore the use of playground experiences to teach middle school science, such as topics on energy, simple machines, motion, and force. The teachers discovered how to engage students in playful, fun, and science-rich experiences that can motivate them to explore the physics in their world. The teachers also discovered playful ways to teach physical science activities using the NYSCI Science playground, local playgrounds and in classrooms.

    Watch the video to see more on what our teachers had to say about the workshop, and view images of the event here.

    The Sciplay Summer Institute video was directed, produced and edited by Alyssa December, and produced by NYSCI’s Explainer TV.

    SciPlay are currently seeking New York City 6th and 7th grade teachers to test our physics app in their classrooms. Email Laura at LRodriguez@nysci.org for more information and to request lesson plans for your next visit to the NYSCI Science Playground.

     

     

    Background

    Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

    NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

    NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

    About the Position

    If you made a Luminescent Night Light at our recent workshop and are interested in the programming that makes it run, we have put the Arduino code online. There are a ton of comments and explanations in there for anyone just getting started with programming.

    Check it out on the Maker Space blog.

     

     

     

    Background

    Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

    NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

    NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

    About the Position

    Fast Company checked in with NYSCI’s Harouna Ba and Local Projects’ Jake Barton as they tested the latest prototype of our soon-to-be-available Physics app.

    “I think sometimes technology does a better job of showing [physics] than actually having someone talk about the concept,” Ba says. “Some of these concepts–motion, force–they are very complex scientific concepts to teach. They’re just hard.”

    Getting kids to play outside, on the other hand, is relatively easy. “Natural play is intrinsically motivating for children,” says Ba, who holds degrees in psychology and sociology.

    Harnessing playing as a motivator, rather than approaching physics concepts in a more pedagogical way, can help science learning reach a broader audience. Ba says he’s noticed that kids, especially those from underserved communities, can get intimidated by technical scientific tools like microscopes. “They’re like, ‘I don’t want to touch this; it’s too expensive,’” Ba says. “We’re trying to invite them into science learning in a very playful way. It’s not school, where they’re just sitting there listening to someone talking.”

    3032886-slide-s-21-this-app-shows-kids-the-science-behind-fun

    The app will be ready later this year. You can check out the entire article and slideshow here.

    Background

    Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

    NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

    NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

    About the Position

    We have another entry to the Make It At Home Challenge! This one comes from Logan who built his luminescent night light out of Legos. We love how he created a pattern of alternating clear and opaque bricks. Bet this makes some cool shadows. Great work Logan!
    View this post and other submissions on the Maker Space tumblr blog.