Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Whether stacking blocks to construct a model city, designing ways to preserve leaves found on the way to school, or lining up by height in the classroom, children demonstrate a clear readiness to engage in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) learning early in life. While early childhood educators are often excited about supporting STEM learning, they aren’t always aware of all the STEM opportunities that can be cultivated in the things they already do with young children inside and outside the classroom.

To address this, NYSCI and Bank Street College of Education are collaborating with teams of educators from P.S. 28 and P.S. 330 in Queens to pilot the “Active STEM Learning in the Early Childhood Classroom” professional development program. As we embark on this new partnership, here’s three things that we hope our school partners take away from this experience.

 

Recognizing STEM Learning in the Everyday

A major goal of this project is to provide early childhood educators with opportunities for noticing the STEM learning that is already happening in their classrooms. Anytime students are asking and answering their own questions, imagining solutions to problems, or exploring the properties of materials, there is a foundation for STEM learning. Throughout this project, NYSCI and Bank Street coaches will guide our school partners in observing their students and reflecting on these observations. Participants will use a newly developed observation tool that we hope will give them a new “lens” for looking at their students’ thinking. Through observation and reflection, we’ll start to identify moments when students are already engaging in STEM thinking in order to build off these successes to provide additional contexts for STEM learning.

 

New Ideas for Familiar Materials

Many people think STEM requires specialized tools or constant access to digital technology, but even the simplest materials can foster deep thinking. During the guided classroom observations, as well as a series of hands-on workshops at NYSCI, we’ll be exploring different uses for materials that are readily available in early childhood classrooms. Something as simple as paper can be used to construct a model house, create a glider, or make a shadow scene. By thinking about how we invite students to explore the properties of materials and consider how these properties can affect the way we use these materials, we’re able to find new life in materials we use every day.

 

Increased Collaboration at Multiple Levels

Not only is this project a collaboration between NYSCI, Bank Street, and our partner schools, we’re also hoping to increase collaboration across school teams. Each school team consists of two kindergarten teachers, two first grade teachers, and one science cluster teacher. In many early childhood settings, there is limited time and support for collaboration among classroom teachers and science specialists. Through this project, we hope to provide our partners with space and resources needed to create an increased culture of collaboration that lasts after the project has ended.

As the project continues throughout this academic year, we’ll use future posts to share what we’re learning from one another, including strategies and tools that we hope other educators can use to support the active STEM learning in their own early childhood classrooms.

Dorothy Bennett and Michaela Labriole.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

New York City educators made ice cream, designed a “better slime,” and used baking soda and vinegar to propel tabletop cars across the floor. The hands-on activities were part of Design2Learn Summer Educator Institute, a weeklong professional development program for teachers and after-school educators held at the New York Hall of Science July 31 – August 4.

The Institute modeled geology and chemistry lessons to the educators and included activities such as the Chem Car Design Challenge, Pom-Pompeii Volcano Design Challenge, Strong Structures Design Challenge and the Slime Design Challenge, as well as ice cream making, oobleck exploration stations, a scavenger hunt and more.

The weeklong program is part of a larger initiative called Design2Learn that was created to boost student interest, engagement and academic performance in science. It fosters collaboration between classroom teachers and after-school educators, bridges the curriculum between the traditional school day and after-school programs, and promotes design-based learning that allows for hands-on engagement with the material.

Watch the teachers in action in this Spectrum News NY1 video.

Design2Learn is a partnership between the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI), ExpandED Schools and the New York City Department of Education.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Learn how to engage your students using video games at this free, two-day program. NYSCI staff will demonstrate how to use a free web-based resource, Gamestar Mechanics, to build systems thinking and 21st century skills, and to create a motivation for STEM learning.

Correlations to computer science standards and NYC Science Scope & Sequence standards will be made.

Course is held on July 6 – 7 from 9 am – 3 pm. Lunch will be provided.

 

STEM Learning Through Video Game Design is made possible through the generous support of Gary B. Pillersdorf, Esq. and the Seth Sprague Educational and Charitable Foundation.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Calling all middle school teachers: NYSCI wants you for our Comic Book Activity Design Team!

As part of the Comic Book Activity Design Team, you’ll work with NYSCI staff and other educators to design activities and classroom resources that will help support the integration of a new interactive comic book, Transmissions: Astonishing Tales of Human-Animal Diseases, in schools across the country.

Transmissions: Astonishing Tales of Human-Animal Diseases tells the story of a group of young people who work to investigate a mysterious disease by collecting and analyzing evidence. The ebook aims to demystify how humans can get diseases that also infect birds and other animals, and helps build science inquiry skills.

Commitment

  • Attend all onsite meetings and complete two hours of online work between each session.
    • March 8: 4 – 6 pm (at NYSCI)
    • April 4: 4 – 6 pm (at NYSCI)
    • May 10: 4 – 6 pm (at NYSCI)
    • June 8: 4 – 6 pm (at NYSCI)
  • Help design curricular resources to support the use of the Transmissions ebook in middle school classrooms.
  • Co-facilitate a one-day summer camp at NYSCI (date TBD).

Benefits

  • $500 stipend
  • Acknowledgement in the final curricular materials.
  • Early access to the Transmissions ebook.
  • Professional development experiences related to content and pedagogical aspects of the Transmissions ebook.

How to Apply

There is no cost to participate in the Comic Book Activity Team, but capacity is limited. Please complete the application form by February 24. Acceptance notifications will be sent out by February 27.

Questions? Please contact Michaela Labriole.

 

APPLY NOW

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) integrate engineering into every grade level from kindergarten through 12th grade. Yet, at the elementary and middle school levels, in particular, most teachers do not have backgrounds or expertise in engineering. Even if they would love to teach it, many say they lack the resources and support to prepare students to be proficient in engineering and inspire them to pursue careers in engineering fields. To address these rapidly growing needs, Accelerate Learning™ and NYSCI have joined forces to develop a new solution called STEMscopes™ DIVE In Engineering.

“The best way to teach engineering isn’t from a textbook; it’s with hands-on, inquiry-based experiences,” said Dr. Vernon Johnson, president and CEO of Accelerate Learning. “For decades, NYSCI has been creating hands-on, energetic educational experiences where learners can indulge their curiosity and nurture their creativity. From the Design Lab to Maker Space Workshops to Design-Make-Play STEM Institutes, NYSCI has deep expertise in engineering and design, and in creating content and experiences that are engaging for students and teachers alike. We’re delighted to collaborate with a true thought leader in STEM to bring STEMscopes DIVE In Engineering to life.”

“There’s a great synergy between STEMscopes and the types of solutions NYSCI develops. However, one of the things that really drew us to Accelerate Learning was the company’s thoughtful approach to supporting teachers. They not only provide the curriculum and tools to meet teachers where they are now, they provide the embedded support teachers need to continuously improve how they teach STEM,” said Margaret Honey, president and CEO of NYSCI. “Our partnership with Accelerate Learning will result in an engineering curriculum that will be used in schools across the country, and get young students engaged in engineering and design and inventing the future.”

STEMscopes DIVE In Engineering will be part of Accelerate Learning’s award-winning STEMscopes PreK–12 product suite, which is built from the ground up to address the NGSS and today’s state standards. The online, comprehensive, hands-on engineering curriculum for grades 3–8 will be available for the 2017-2018 school year.

For more information, visit acceleratelearning.com or call toll-free 800-531-0864.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

By Michaela Labriole.

A group of educators huddles around a paint tray. “Whose turn is it to be the storm this time?”

The designated “storm” pours water over a model city contained in the tray, while the other group members watch. Sponges representing things like parks or green roofs absorb the water. “We did it! Look! We prevented the trash from flowing into the river.”

While this might seem like an experiment about street trash or the water cycle, these teachers were actually investigating how climate change is impacting New York City and the many city systems local residents rely on. Rather than learning about climate change as a collection of discreet facts to be memorized, the educators in this professional development program learned to apply systems thinking to the complex topic of climate change impacts and solutions.

Staff from the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) facilitated this particular workshop as part of the Climate and Urban System Partnership (CUSP), a project between scientists and educators aimed at engaging city dwellers in climate change issues. The workshop participants explored the interplay between increased frequency of heavy rainstorms caused by climate change, an overloading of the wastewater system, and water management options afforded by green infrastructure projects.

One participant said of her workshop experience:

“(Prior to the workshop) When I thought about climate change, I thought about severe heat waves – you know, global warming. I didn’t think about rainstorms or street flooding. And I didn’t realize that we were already seeing effects of a changing climate. And I definitely had no idea how to fit this into my curriculum!”

This teacher is not alone. A recent report, published in Science, reveals that while a majority of teachers in the United States do teach about climate change, they spend, on average, just one to two hours per academic year on the topic. Additionally, a large percentage of the teachers included in the study were found to include incorrect or inaccurate information in their teachings about climate change.

A recent article in the New York Times notes that this level of confusion among educators may not be surprising. Many teachers didn’t have exposure to climate change information as part of their science education training and some educators may lack the confidence needed to successfully teach the subject matter fully.

Still, while climate change is not universally included in a standard curriculum, the importance of teaching about climate change is increasingly recognized and the topic is included in the new Next Generation Science Standards.

To address the findings of the report, it isn’t enough to simply provide teachers with more information about climate change. Traditionally, climate change has been taught using the information-deficit approach to education. Under this model, it is assumed that learners simply lack information about a topic, and that providing more information is sufficient to help people understand a concept.

While prevalent, the information-deficit model has been shown to be ineffective in teaching about climate change. In fact, in some cases, people feel so overwhelmed by the information, they simply ignore it (Moser and Dilling 2011).1

It’s time to move away from an information-deficit approach and embrace a systems thinking approach.

Systems thinking is the process of examining and understanding the various parts of a system and the interactions among these components. A systems thinking approach allows both teachers and students to see complex science concepts as part of a bigger picture.

For climate change education in particular, it’s important to take a step back and examine the impacts the changing climate has on all areas of our lives: local wildlife, flooding, public transit, water quality, etc. Similarly, what opportunities for solutions exist?

By taking a systems approach to climate change in teacher professional development, teachers are empowered to decide how the big ideas in climate change fit in with their curriculum.

NYSCI uses a system approach in its professional development workshops. The workshops combat misconceptions and help educators see climate change as a cross-disciplinary issue relevant to their lives and the lives of their students.

For example, as part of the CUSP project, NYSCI develops educational opportunities, like the paint tray stormwater runoff workshop, that help learners make connections between local climate change impacts and solutions, city systems, and their own personal interests and passions.

By understanding the complex interactions involved in a changing climate, teachers increase their own confidence in teaching about these intricate relationships, to evaluate climate change information they come across in the media, and to connect climate change content to things that are relevant to their students’ lives.

Systems thinking at NYSCI is not limited to teacher professional development workshops or even to programs about climate change. It is also a key component of events such as SUBMERGE, NYSCI’s annual marine science festival, or in experiences like NYSCI’s immersive sustainability exhibition, Connected Worlds.

1Moser, S.C., and Dilling, L. (2011). Communicating Climate Change: Closing The Science –Action Gap. The Oxford Handbook of Climate Change and Society (pp. 161-176). Eds. J.S. Dryzek, R.B. Norgaard, and D. Schlosberg. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.

As manager of special projects for NYSCI, Michaela Labriole oversees NYSCI’s online programs for educators. Her expertise includes climate change education and programs that engage girls in STEM.

 

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Teachers looking for Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) resources now have 17 new options to choose from. The Teacher TryScience website now features a growing set of resources that demonstrate how existing K-12 science lessons can be evaluated and revised to more closely align to the NGSS, using the Educators Evaluating Quality in Instructional Products (EQuIP) rubric. Using the EQuIP process, NYSCI educators have revised existing lessons, making them more rigorous, engaging, and ultimately more informative for teachers.

Through a partnership supported by IBM, NYSCI and Achieve, the nonprofit organization that helped develop NGSS, began collaborating on the lessons in 2014. The free lessons, designed for students in late elementary through high school, cover topics as varied as air pollution, solar design, food packaging, wind power and biodiversity. Along with the lessons, EQuIP Rubrics, outlines and other materials are also available. Lessons are also aligned with the Common Core Standards for Mathematics (CCSM) and the Common Core Standards for English Language Arts (ELA).

The lessons and supporting materials can be downloaded for free at teacherstryscience.com/ngsslanding.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Anthony Negron, manager of digital programming at NYSCI, shares his experience at this year’s Digital Media and Learning Conference. 

Due to the generosity of The New York Community Trust and the Hive Digital Media Learning Fund, I was able to attend this years Digital Media and Learning Conference in Los Angeles, California. There was a vast assortment of panel sessions and workshops to choose from and I want to highlight some key insights that I was able to walk away with.

One of the first panel sessions I went to was called The Open Show: Connected Learning Without Expensive Acronyms. This session was presented in an engaging, talk show format. A great tool that was shared is http://connectedlearning.tv/case-studies. On this site you can learn about what connected learning is and its six core principles, and review various case studies showing real-world applications. One of the main ideas I walked away with is how connected learning allows your students the ability to feel empowered and address their specific interests in a setting that allows students to learn from each other. This is something we are really excited to implement in our upcoming #TinkerTech program that will start on August 17.

Another session I attended opened with an anecdote from panelist member Sam Dyson, who said he remembered how deeply transformative it was for him when he realized that something he had learned in one class actually connected to something he learned in another class. This session was entitled Blurring Boundaries By Design and it had some amazing people leading the conversation including my mentor and former NYSCI supervisor, Chris Lawrence. Much of the conversation focused around education ecosystems and how improvements could be made when stronger relationships are built among those directly and indirectly involved in educating young people. There were some really amazing takeaways from this session and it helped cement the importance of ourGirls First Digital Studio curriculum that is currently facilitated across multiple sites in New York City including Girl Scouts of Greater NYC, CodorDojo, Sports & Arts in School Foundation and The Parks Department Computer Resource Center. Establishing this network of educators has allowed NYSCI the ability to spread its program to diverse students in New York and learn best practices for facilitating effective design-based learning curriculum to students of different backgrounds.

Something that I truly enjoyed from attending this conference were the Ignite Talks, which can be described as rapid-fire presentations by organizations who shared the amazing work they are doing with youth. There were representatives from the Harry Potter Alliance, ENGage and The Dream Defenders, to name a few. Hopefully at next year’s conference, NYSCI will be a part of the Ignite Talks sharing our#TinkerTech, C3: Collect, Construct, Change and Girls First Digital Studio programs!

 

 

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

August 24 – 25; 9 am – 3 pm

Join the Institute for the Study of Knowledge Management In Education (ISKME) as they provide teachers with the opportunity to learn about a free online resource called OER Commons.

This two day workshop will focus on ways to embed these tools into classroom instruction which will benefit student learning.

You will learn how to achieve inquiry-based instructional goals, including:

• standards alignment and instructional shifts in the Common Core.
• how to access free instructional resources and professional learning materials.
• how to curate and author content for your own classroom.
• classroom-ready resources that are both aspirational and practical.

This workshop will be facilitated by the ISKME team, including an in-service teacher with first hand experience of the connections and benefits of these resources. Teachers who register must be able to attend on both days.
Space is limited and reserved on a first come, first served basis. Free workshop for middle school teachers.
Register Now

 

Institute_for_the_Study_of_Knowledge_Management_in_Education_logo

 

To learn about future courses and resources for teachers, sign up for our Teacher eblast.

 

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Learn how to incorporate playful and interactive activities for early elementary students that demonstrate animal adaptations across various biomes. Participants will learn how to utilize designing and making strategies that investigate the differences in animals including predator/prey relationships and how animals are adapted to survive in the environments that they live in. Connections will be made to Common Core and NYC Science Scope and Sequence.

This course is recommended for educators who teach grades K–4 and will be led by the Science Coach Supervisor Ms. Jasmine Maldonado.

Breakfast and lunch will be provided. Fee: $75

If you are paying by purchase order, please contact Georgette Williams at (718) 595-9114 or gwilliams@nysci.org.

Book Now

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Monday July 20 – Wednesday July 22, 2015
The New York Hall of Science, Corona, NY

NYSCI invites experts across various disciplines to attend an all-expenses paid 3-day workshop to explore how modern technologies (such as logs of exhibit interactions, technologies for tracking visitor movements) and methods (such as data mining and social network algorithms) can be used to address a challenge that has thus far stymied STEM museums: documenting and understanding learning that occur in museums. Inquiry-driven experimentation, parent-child interactions, emergent collaborations, and peripheral participation are just a few of the learning activities that are known to occur in museums, but which are difficult or painstaking for researchers to detect and document. It may also be the case that new analytic approaches, by virtue of the new lens they bring to visitor behaviors, may expose new learning phenomena to be examined.

Deadline to apply: May 31, 2015

The study of informal STEM learning is at the cusp of innovation, where technology, expertise, and societal need can combine to promote the development of truly new perspectives on how learning can be documented unobtrusively, where it occurs naturally, and without undermining the spontaneous nature of learning.

Outcomes of this workshop will be:

  • to generate new applications for existing analytic approaches.
  • to define opportunities for innovating new analyses and technologies.
  • to begin to lay the groundwork for ethical guidelines for the application of existing and imagined analytic approaches.
  • to foment cross-disciplinary collaborations that can spur the advance of all participating disciplines.

Please use this form to nominate yourself or other attendees who you think would contribute to this endeavor. We are seeking participants who are established in their careers and very familiar with their fields, as well as those who are just beginning their work but who have a fresh perspective to share in these areas:

  • Practice: practical experience with how learning emerges in informal learning settings, and with working in such settings.
  • Learning research: the collection and analysis of data that shed light on individual or social learning phenomena (both quantitative approaches and qualitative approaches that may be amenable to automation).
  • Technology: the design of technology for tracking the behavior of entities in environments (e.g., tracking or logging the actions of humans or animals).
  • Analytics: experience with designing or implementing analytic approaches for studying the behavior of entities using data records (log files, or tracking data files).

The nominations will be reviewed by the workshop organizers and advisory board, and announcements will be sent out in early June. We will work with you to book travel arrangements.

Organizers:

Leilah Lyons, Director of Digital Learning Research, NYSCI, and Assistant Professor of Computer Science and the Learning Sciences at the University of Illinois at Chicago.
Stephen Uzzo, Vice President of Science & Technology, NYSCI.
Kemi Jona, Research Professor of Learning Sciences and Computer Science and Director of the Office of STEM Education Partnerships, Northwestern University.
Catherine Cramer, Program Manager, NYSCI.

Advisory Board:

Matthew Berland, Assistant Professor of Digital Media in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, University of Wisconsin Madison.
Vera Michalchik, Senior Associate Director for Learning Science & Technology, Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL), Stanford.
Valerie Shute, Mack and Effie Campbell Tyner Endowed Professor of Education, Florida State University.
Martin Storksdieck, Director, Center for Research of Lifelong STEM Learning, Oregon State University.

Questions?

Please send any further questions to Leilah Lyons and Stephen Uzzo.

nsf1_nextgen

Supported by the National Science Foundation under CISE Award No. 1457431.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

The family component of any school is vital to enhancing the school culture and student performance. Because of this, Urban Advantage works with the school’s parent coordinators, teachers, and administrators to support family engagement through science activities.

This past week the New York Hall of Science invited UA middle school Parent Coordinators to spend the day becoming novice rocket scientists. Parent Coordinators had a chance to construct and experiment with the design of their rocket, while drawing connections to aerodynamics, force and motion, and Common Core Standards. This experience will allow our Parent Coordinators to plan family field trips, family science nights and parent workshops that offer families the opportunity to explore science concepts through hands-on, group activities.

https://vine.co/v/OrllDpLvgVX/embed/simple

For more information about this program, visit http://www.urbanadvantagenyc.org

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Karen Saur, Professional Development Supervisor talks about NYSCI’s involvement in the Urban Advantage program.

The goal of Urban Advantage is to support and improve teaching and learning in public school science education.

Urban Advantage is a standards-based partnership program designed to improve students’ understanding of scientific inquiry through collaborations between urban public school systems and science cultural institutions.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

SciPlay invited 18 New York City middle school science teachers to take part in the SciPlay Summer Institute at NYSCI in August 2014. The goal was to explore the use of playground experiences to teach middle school science, such as topics on energy, simple machines, motion, and force. The teachers discovered how to engage students in playful, fun, and science-rich experiences that can motivate them to explore the physics in their world. The teachers also discovered playful ways to teach physical science activities using the NYSCI Science playground, local playgrounds and in classrooms.

Watch the video to see more on what our teachers had to say about the workshop, and view images of the event here.

The Sciplay Summer Institute video was directed, produced and edited by Alyssa December, and produced by NYSCI’s Explainer TV.

SciPlay are currently seeking New York City 6th and 7th grade teachers to test our physics app in their classrooms. Email Laura at LRodriguez@nysci.org for more information and to request lesson plans for your next visit to the NYSCI Science Playground.

 

 

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

NYSCI’s educational programs have been recently recognized by the Center for Interactive Learning and Collaboration (CILC) for their high quality of educational content and exceptional skill at program delivery.

The Virtual Visit program has won a Pinnacle Award for the 2013-14 school year. Virtual visits at NYSCI connect classrooms, hospitals and community centers to NYSCI instructors through a variety of videoconferencing technologies. They include exploration of NYSCI exhibits, demonstrations and activities, bringing NYSCI to students who may not otherwise be able to experience our effective style of hands-on learning.

NYSCI was also recognized with an honorable mention for online teacher professional development programs, making us the only organization recognized in both categories of content and professional development.

NYSCI Virtual Visits is made possible, in part, with support from the Verizon Foundation.

 

 

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Fifteen teaching residents were tinkering at Design Lab today as part of a program called MASTER – Math and Science Teacher Residency Program. MASTER is a collaboration between NYSCI, Hunter College, and New Visions for Public Schools and is funded by the National Science Foundation. The two-year program trains high school math and science teaching candidates in hands-on classroom experiences that ignite students’ interest in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM).

By experimenting with Design Lab activities, the teacher residents will see, first hand, how the design and engineering process can help students learn STEM concepts. They will then use the Design Lab activities to think about possible lessons and learning activities that can be created for classroom use. The two-year MASTER program also includes coursework, training for interpreting and monitoring data, and community engagement. Once certified, the 15 teacher residents will be placed in schools throughout New York City.

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. DUE-1238157.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Learn how to integrate hands-on STEM activities and literacy strategies into your science classroom with this free professional development program for middle school teachers. Participants will explore how to help students ask focused questions, set up investigations, and practice inquiry-based problem solving. By the end of this program, participants will cover various techniques to help them engage a broad spectrum of learners and teach a well-rounded science curriculum, regardless of the content topic. The program meets on February 18, 19 & 20 from 9 am – 4 pm, for a total of 20 hours. Participants will receive a $250 stipend at the end of the program.

To apply, fill out the application by February 9, 2014.