Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Join us at this special evening event, Maker Night, to learn about the wide range of career opportunities available in the maker world. At this free event, you can engage in hands-on activities, hear from experts in the field through career conversations, and network with STEM professionals. Light refreshments will be provided.

This event is geared towards middle school, high school and college students who are curious about careers in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM).

Chaperones are required for students under age 16. Please bring your student or teacher ID.

RSVP required.

 

Here’s a look at last year’s Makers Night:

STEM Night: Making for the Community

 

Get Involved: STEM professionals interested in sharing their experiences with students and joining this event, or educators with student groups who want to attend this event, please contact acanova@nysci.org for more information.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Join us at this special evening event, STEM Night: Making for the Community, to learn about the wide range of career opportunities available in the maker world. At this free event, you can engage in hands-on activities, hear from experts in the field through a panel discussion, and network with STEM professionals. Light refreshments will be provided.

STEM Night: Making for the Community will feature STEM professionals and organizations including:

• UM Project
• Columbia Maker Space
• MakerState
• Museum of Interesting Things
• Upperline Code
• Make Mode
• STEM Advancement Inc.

 

This event is geared towards high school and college students who are curious about careers in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM).

Chaperones are required for students under age 16. Please bring your student or teacher ID.

RSVP required. 

 

Get Involved: STEM professionals interested in sharing their experiences with students and joining this event, or educators with student groups who want to attend this event, please contact acanova@nysci.org for more information.

 

The STEM Night series is a program of NYSCI’s Alan J. Friedman Center for the Development of Young Scientists. 
NYSCI STEM Nights are made possible with support from the New York Life Foundation, The Neuberger Berman Foundation and Con Edison.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

The National Science Foundation recently announced the formation of Big Data Innovation Hubs across the United States, and NYSCI is a founding member of the Northeast regional effort. NYSCI will serve as the outreach and education partner for the Northeast Big Data Hub, working with other partners to develop new and accessible ways for citizens to engage with and learn about big data and their impact on society. NYSCI will extend over a decade of experience in bringing big data to teachers and learners, and an expanding learning research agenda to develop outreach programs, learning research projects and partnerships with the K–16 education community.

Data literacy is crucial to 21st century citizenship, yet there are very limited resources and no formal frameworks for the teaching and learning communities or lifelong learners to support data literacy efforts. NYSCI is dedicated to making important yet abstract concepts meaningful to learners so that they become self-motivated in their learning. One of NYSCI’s key research goals is the understanding of the foundational processes children need to build so that they have a solid foundation of analytical competencies, making them smart consumers in a world laden with data as well as smart users of computational techniques in every discipline. NYSCI’s role is to better prepare the future workforce to deal with the implications of data sciences that intimately affect the lives of all people, and to make data literacy an important aspect of teaching and learning.

Led by Columbia University and funded by the National Science Foundation, this $1.25 million research project will share data, tools and ideas for confronting some of the biggest challenges facing the northeastern United States, including health care, energy, urbanization, natural science and education. The Hub consists of 40 partners, including those in industry, academia, government and non-profits, and covers nine states: New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Connecticut.

The first workshop for the Northeast Big Data Hub will be held on December 16 at Columbia University.

 

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Educators attending the Western Academy Support and Training Center (WASTC) West Coast Academy Conference in Pomona, California in June 2015 had a chance to hear about the successful program for high school students, NetSci High. As the NetSci High project manager, I was delighted to be able to use the Cisco Collaboration Studio at NYSCI to talk live to the WASTC educators about the success of NetSci High, and how they might get involved.

The annual WASTC conference is an opportunity for Western US Cisco Networking Academy teachers to attend seminars and talks, pre-conference workshops, and receive training. Conference organizer Karen Stanton thought this would be an ideal context for the assembled educators to hear details about the NYSCI program NetSci High.

In my presentation I gave an overview of NYSCI’s long-term involvement in Network Science, starting in 2004 with the opening of the exhibit Connections, currently on display at NYSCI. Then in 2012, NYSCI receiving the ITEST grant  from the National Science Foundation for a project called Network Science for the Next Generation, or NetSci High. NetSci High consists of small teams of students, their teacher, and a grad student from a research lab who collaborate on a year-long Network Science research project. NetSci High has been very successful, and has spawned several spin-off efforts such as Network Literacy, and the development of an elective Network Science course in a New York high school. One of our active NetSci High teachers, John Tebbett, is from the Cisco Networking Academy at Chelsea CTE High School in Lower Manhattan.

I concluded the presentation by inviting attending educators to participate in NetSci High, and to date, educators from Woodland and Vista School districts, University of California Davis and Hartnell College have begun to pursue collaborations. For further information about this program, please contact me at ccramer@nysci.org.

You can learn more about NetSci High here: https://sites.google.com/a/binghamton.edu/netscihigh/home

 

 

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

NYSCI, along with partners at Binghamton University, The Network Science Center at West Point, and University of Oxford, is proud to announce the publication of a groundbreaking document: Network Literacy: Essential Concepts and Core Ideas.

Network-Literacy-coverAs our world becomes increasingly connected through the use of networks that allow instantaneous communication and the spread of information, the degree of people’s understanding of how these networks work will play a major role in determining how much society will benefit from this heightened connectivity. In short, a networked society requires network literacy: basic knowledge about how networks can be used as a tool for discovery and decision-making, and about both their potential benefits and pitfalls, made accessible for all people living in today’s networked world. Moreover, because even young children interact with networks all day, every day, it is important that network literacy begins at a young age, and because networks are present in all aspects of contemporary life, the consideration of networks should be reflected throughout teaching practice in a cross-disciplinary manner. Yet despite the importance and ubiquity of networks, the study of networks is absent from current educational systems.

This brochure provides an initial step toward facilitating the development of network literacy. It states basic ideas for the study of networks in plain language, presenting seven essential concepts and more detailed core ideas that are described in a concise manner. It can be used by everyone for teaching and learning. This work was developed iteratively and collaboratively by a community of scientists and practitioners who develop and use the cutting-edge science of networks. It was designed by NYSCI Explainer Eri Yamamoto.

DOWNLOAD HERE

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

A paper describing the success of the project NetSci High is now published as part of the proceedings for the 6th Workshop on Complex Networks (CompleNet), which will be held at NYSCI in March 2015. NYSCI is a partner in NetSci High, a project funded by NSF that connects high school students from Title 1 NYC schools with research labs to work on independent Network Science research projects. The paper can be read in its entirety here.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

On September 24, 2014, NetSci High students from Newburgh Free Academy, Chelsea CTE High School and Elmont Memorial High School paid a visit to NYSCI to participate in a day-long network science experience, learning some of the many applications of network science.

They began the day working through a graph theory exercise—the foundation of network science—and then had a chance to tour the interactive Connections and Mathmatica exhibits, as well as exploring NYSCI’s many other exhibits. After lunch they broke into small groups to explore network visualizations from many different disciplines and then presented their findings to the whole group.

NetSci High students will use the broader perspective they gained from this trip as they begin their own independent research projects. The teams hope to present their research at a poster session at the 6th Workshop on Complex Networks (CompleNet 2015), an international network science conference being held at NYSCI on March 25 – 27, 2015.

 

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

IMG_0944High school students participating in the fifth year of the NSF-funded program Network Science for the Next Generation, also known as NetSci High, recently returned from an intensive 10-day workshop at Boston University. The goal of NetSci High is to immerse high school students and teachers in the burgeoning field of network science through a yearlong research experience. The experiential research-based program has reached 120 disadvantaged high school students, 30 science research graduate student mentors, and 20 high school STEM teacher mentors in New York and Boston.

NetSci High begins every year with an intensive 10-day summer workshop during which students and teachers are introduced to network science concepts, learn programming skills in Python and Gephi, and practice creating basic network models using visualization software. During the July 2014 summer workshop students also had an opportunity to meet Dr. Alex (“Sandy”) Pentland from MIT’s Media Lab, Dr. Gene Stanley from Boston University’s Center for Polymer Studies, and other Network Science researchers, and heard about current applications in network science. At the end of this summer’s workshop, the eleven student teams who had just completed their year-long NetSci High research projects during the 2013/14 school year presented their research on a wide variety of topics, representing the interdisciplinary nature of network science and its ability to draw students of all interests into STEM fields.

Student Research Topics 2013/14
  • A Network Analysis of Foreign Aid Based on Bias of Political Ideologies
  • Comparing Two Human Disease Networks: Gene-Based and Symptom-Based Perspectives
  • How Does One Become Successful on Reddit.com?
  • Influence at the 1787 Constitutional Convention
  • Learning Programming with Processing for Network Science
  • Quantifying Similarity of Benign and Oncogenic Viral Proteins Using Amino Acid Sequence
  • Quantification of Character and Plot in Contemporary Fiction
  • Ranking and Alliance Determination Software for VEX Robotics Competitions
  • RedNet: A Different Perspective of Reddit
  • Teaching Grammar Better Using Link Analysis
  • Tracking Tweets for the Superbowl

Throughout the upcoming 2014/15 academic year, research center faculty and graduate student mentors will guide the new student teams through the research process of data collection, data processing, network modeling and analysis, using freely available computer tools. Through the use of technology the teams will further explore how to visualize different types of networks, calculate network statistics, and describe network processes. Teams then analyze the data to find answers to their specific research questions. Students will also visit the New York Hall of Science, the Network Science Center at United States Military Academy West Point, and Stevens Institute of Technology in order to broaden their exposure to current network science research.

This project has had many successes, including scholarships for student participants, student publication in peer-reviewed journals, and student teams presenting their research posters at the International NetSci conference in Berkeley, CA. NetSci High organizers look forward to increasing network science literacy through continued student research opportunities, broader teacher training, and publishing a Network Science Workshop Training Manual for other groups to use.