Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Join us at this special evening event, Maker Night, to learn about the wide range of career opportunities available in the maker world. At this free event, you can engage in hands-on activities, hear from experts in the field through career conversations, and network with STEM professionals. Light refreshments will be provided.

This event is geared towards middle school, high school and college students who are curious about careers in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM).

Chaperones are required for students under age 16. Please bring your student or teacher ID.

RSVP required.

 

Here’s a look at last year’s Makers Night:

STEM Night: Making for the Community

 

Get Involved: STEM professionals interested in sharing their experiences with students and joining this event, or educators with student groups who want to attend this event, please contact acanova@nysci.org for more information.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

In this episode, Mariel interviews female pilot and engineer, Pauline Parent, from Dassault Falcon Jet in Teterboro Airport, New Jersey.

Questions asked were:
• Please introduce yourself by your name and position here.
• What is the overall philosophy of Dassault Falcon Jet? What’s their purpose?
• How did you discover that you were interested in aviation?
• What has been your hardest parts and your triumphs as a female pilot?
• What tips do you have for females wanting to go into this expanding field?
• What do you hope the aviation industry accomplishes in the next decade?

Special thanks to NYSCI Trustee Al Bunshaft, and to John and Pauline at Dassault Falcon.
To learn more about Dassault Falcon, visit https://www.dassaultfalcon.com/en/Pages/Home.aspx

Producer: Mariel
Cam B: Kevin Cunningham
Editor: Emily
Co-Editor: Kevin Cunningham
Audio: Emily
Director: Mizanur Rahman

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Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Join us in NYSCI’s Design Lab to learn about an abstract South Indian design form called kolam. Mostly practiced by South Indian Hindu women, kolams are made by trickling powder through the fingers. Small to medium kolams are created every morning: between the night and the day, and between the street and the home. Larger kolams are created for special occasions. The Tamil month of Margazhi (mid-December through mid-January) is a time when women go out of their way to create a different large kolam every day and often participate in formal and informal contests.

Kolam-Making
noon – 2:30 pm
Practice making kolams with local experts.

Mathematical Thinking Among Kolam Experts – A Talk by Dr. Sunita Vatuk
2:30 pm
Learn more about the tradition and its mathematical connections.

Dr. Sunita Vatuk is a mathematician and assistant professor of secondary math Education at The City College of New York. She has worked extensively with math teachers and math students in workshops in the United States and India held at and/or sponsored by Fulbright-USIEF, Vigyan Prasar, Museum of Modern Art, Eye on India, UC Davis, Princeton University, CU Boulder, Origami USA, and Math for America, among others. While she was a graduate student in pure math, she worked as a teaching artist in the New York City schools. Inspired by that experience, she has incorporated paper-folding, weaving, printmaking, photography, ceramics and other hands-on activities in her own math classes at City College, as well as in workshops for math majors, students and math teachers.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Parent's role in STEM education

Like countless immigrants before her, Angelica Salgado came to the United States to provide a better life for her family. Like many newcomers in the Corona section of Queens, Angelica works hard to give her three children the best education New York schools have to offer. She trusts that the school system and teachers “will do right” by them.

Indeed, the schools have improved. But perhaps not enough to merit her trust.

In 2016, the district’s English Language Arts scores for 3–8th graders increased by seven percentage points as compared to the previous year. However, English language learners, like Angelica’s children and those of the two-thirds of Corona families born outside the U.S., did not fare as well: their scores decreased by one percentage point.

The situation is even worse for non-native students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) courses. Careers in those areas are where the jobs are, now and in the future, but many parents who are ambitious for their children hesitate to get involved in advocacy for them or in planning their courses and extra-curricular activity. To immigrant families, the overall school-to-work pipeline may be downright mysterious.

So what’s a parent to do? As president and CEO of the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI), I take this question very seriously.

(Andrew Kelly/ NY Hall of Science)

Our educators and researchers know that few formal and coordinated efforts exist to connect students to STEM opportunities and careers. Yet studies indicate that family engagement in children’s education yields positive results — children stay in school longer, they perform better and have better school experiences. This is consistent across grade levels, for in- and out-of-school contexts and among African American and Latino families.

So we’ve identified five types of programs and resources that parents need:

1. Resources to help parents understand and navigate the school system. The New York City Department of Education created parent coordinator positions in 2003. Parent coordinators have traditionally answered phones and helped with translation, but as Mrs. Salgado noted, “Some schools have more engaging parent coordinators than others.” Chancellor Carmen Fariña has moved to increase training for parent coordinators to be more proactive, such as organizing parents to take field trips and explaining ways they can help their children’s education. More could be done to strengthen these connections.

2. Access to STEM academic coursework and real pathways to STEM-related careers. Some schools host career nights and other work-focused events. Informal institutions such as museums and libraries could offer more programs. At NYSCI, we host free STEM Nights where kids can watch presentations from STEM professionals and chat with them afterward in a relaxed setting. Free resources such as the New York Urban League’s A Parent’s Guide to STEM can provide further insight.

3. Programs that emphasize a two-generation approach that includes both children and parents. Some activities that are becoming popular educate the parents while educating the child. The Home Instruction for Parents of Preschool Youngsters (HIPPY) is a nonprofit program that shows parents their critical role as their children’s first teacher. HIPPY uses home visitors to role-play educational games with parents they can then play with their children. NYSCI runs a similar Little Makers program that invites families with young children to tinker, design and create projects together, from glider airplanes to sidewalk chalk art to superhero gadgets.

4. Activities across multiple settings that foster student success as a shared community responsibility. Our NYSCI Neighbors program works with 700 local families and schools to provide discounted entry to museums and invitations to STEM activities. The NYSCI auditorium is used for PTA meetings, and every year before our annual Maker Faire we invite area families to a pre-Faire community event.

5. Platforms that give parents a voice to ensure that their concerns and stories are recognized. School listservs, Facebook groups, parenting blogs and similar resources let parents seek guidance from teachers, school administrators and other experts, and to support other parents struggling with similar issues.

We still need to offer parents more. A new program called Parent University will be a component of our Queens 20/20 initiative that makes it easier for parents to find and use available resources. Then parents like Angelica Salgado will be better able to prepare their children for college work in STEM subjects and possibly careers in a STEM field.

Only if all of us — schools, museums, and community organizations — make it easier for parents to find the resources they need will we be able finally to “do right” by Angelica Salgado and her children.

Margaret Honey is the president and CEO of the New York Hall of Science in Queens, New York. Her essay is part of a series on parent engagement produced by the philanthropic foundation Carnegie Corporation of New York.

Para la versión en español, haga clic aquí.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

As New Yorkers head to the polls this Tuesday, there are still 5% of Republican voters and 3% of Democratic voters who remain undecided according to a recent poll of likely primary voters. This in spite of a deluge of information, often fueled by data from exit polls and opinion polls at every step and turn of the primary season. Today, the New York Times even took an informal look at which candidate is a true New Yorker, using images of pizza slices to show their ratings on things like accent, attitude, and whether or not they’ve seen the Broadway hit Hamilton.

This election year, one thing is clear: Someone out there is having a lot of fun with math.

And now you can too.

Using our Fraction Mash app, you can take photos of your two favorite presidential hopefuls and merge them into your ideal candidate. Perhaps you like 5/8ths of Clinton’s views, but want to add 3/8ths of Sanders. Or you prefer 5/8th Trump with 3/8th Cruz. You even get to choose what fraction size each piece of your presidential puzzle should be. Maybe you like your puzzle pieces to be big and bold – 1/8 or 1/16 pieces may be best for you. Or maybe you like them small and precise – 1/100 or even 1/625. You decide. The power is in your hands.

So what if you haven’t decided who you’ll vote for on Tuesday. You’re a New Yorker, you’ll figure out what to do. You’re used to deciding among many choices at the last minute – what party to go to, sushi or samosas for dinner, cab or subway, standard deduction or itemized.

You still have a few days to make up your mind about Tuesday’s primary. In the meantime, have some fun with fractions and decide what your ideal presidential candidate would look like. For some of you, that may be the easiest decision you make all month.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

We’re joining other pi enthusiasts around the world to celebrate Pi Day. Pi (Greek letter “π”) is the symbol used in mathematics to represent a constant — the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter — which is approximately 3.14159.

Celebrate Pi Day with NYSCI Explainers and a series of math-focused activities in our Mathematica: A World of Numbers exhibition.

Topology Ropes

Free yourself from ropes, not with smoke screens or magic, but with the power of topology, the mathematical study of surfaces.

Twenty-One Cards

Math is all around us and can even be used to read your mind.  Stop by and try this 21 Card trick, but remember the secret is all in the numbers.

Around the Universe

The planets in our Solar System orbit the Sun in the shape of an ellipse.  Find out what that means and why they’re stuck that way at our Pi Day Celebration.

Free with NYSCI admission.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

WNET and NYSCI invite you to Super Cyberchase Day! This action-packed day will feature a variety of activities related to math and the environment, including:

  • Meet-and-Greets with Cyberchase stars, Harry and Digit, at 12:30 (members only), 1:30 , 2:30 and 3:30 pm.
  • Hands-on activities for all ages from noon – 4 pm.
  • Screenings of episodes from the current season of Cyberchase at 12:30, 1:30, 2:30 and 3:30 pm.
  • A chance to win a Cyberchase and NYSCI prize pack.

Super Cyberchase Day is free with NYSCI admission.

Funding for Cyberchase is provided by The Arthur Vining Davis Foundations, the Helena Rubinstein Foundation, The JPB Foundation and Ernst & Young LLP. Additional funding is provided by the Volckhausen Family. Cyberchase is a production of THIRTEEN Productions LLC in association with WNET and Title Entertainment. All rights reserved. The PBS KIDS logo is a registered mark of PBS and is used with permission.