Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Join us for STEM Night: Engineering to learn about the wide range of career opportunities available in the engineering field. At this free event, you can engage in hands-on activities, hear from experts in the field through career conversations, and network with STEM professionals. Light refreshments will be provided.

This event is geared towards middle school, high school and college students who are curious about careers in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM).

Chaperones are required for students under age 16. Please bring your student or teacher ID.

RSVP required. 

 

Here’s a look at last year’s STEM Night: Engineering:

STEM Night: Design & Engineering

 

Get Involved: STEM professionals interested in sharing their experiences with students and joining this event, or educators with student groups who want to attend this event, please contact acanova@nysci.org for more information.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Join us for STEM Night: Health and Medicine to learn about the wide range of career opportunities available in the medical field. At this free event, you can engage in hands-on activities, hear from experts in the field through career conversations, and network with STEM professionals. Light refreshments will be provided.

This event is geared towards middle school, high school and college students who are curious about careers in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM).

Chaperones are required for students under age 16. Please bring your student or teacher ID.

RSVP required.

 

Get Involved: STEM professionals interested in sharing their experiences with students and joining this event, or educators with student groups who want to attend this event, please contact acanova@nysci.org for more information.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Middle school students and their parents are invited to explore different New York City high schools, specialized and not, and the opportunities offered. Students can talk with representatives from each school about the application process, deadlines, requirements and school life.

Free, RSVP required.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Join us at this special evening event, Maker Night, to learn about the wide range of career opportunities available in the maker world. At this free event, you can engage in hands-on activities, hear from experts in the field through career conversations, and network with STEM professionals. Light refreshments will be provided.

This event is geared towards middle school, high school and college students who are curious about careers in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM).

Chaperones are required for students under age 16. Please bring your student or teacher ID.

RSVP required.

 

Here’s a look at last year’s Makers Night:

STEM Night: Making for the Community

 

Get Involved: STEM professionals interested in sharing their experiences with students and joining this event, or educators with student groups who want to attend this event, please contact acanova@nysci.org for more information.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Our Explainers are heading off to college!

This year, 21 NYSCI Explainers graduated from high school. As part of the Science Career Ladder (SCL) – the signature program of the Alan J. Friedman Center for the Development of Young Scientists – our Explainers explain NYSCI’s STEM-focused exhibits to visitors, perform science demonstrations, and assist with educational workshops and camps. After graduation, our team continues to provide support by letting them know that they always have a home here at NYSCI as they embark on their college journey!

At our last High School to College Workshop, we were privileged to have Dr. Darren Ferguson, Manager of Special Programs at LaGuardia Community College, as the guest speaker. Dr. Ferguson spoke about the first year experience and gave our Explainers a sense of what to expect when they go away in the fall.

We are proud to announce that this year’s class will be attending college at CUNY’s Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC), City College, Hunter College, LaGuardia Community College and Queens College; SUNY’s Buffalo, New Paltz and Stony Brook; as well as Loyola Maryland, MIT, NYIT, Ohio State, St John’s, Union College, University of Buffalo and Yale. Thirteen of the students have already declared that they will pursue STEM majors, including in biology, chemistry, computer science, engineering, geology, physical therapy and pre-med.

We wish them all the best and look forward to hearing about their future successes!

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Experience a night at the museum at NYSCI with your friends and family! Middle school, high school and college students, AND their parents are invited to explore summer academic and internship opportunities in STEM, witness interactive science demonstrations, listen to music, explore the museum after dark, and enjoy a taste of Queens.

Date: May 19, 2017
Time: 5:30 – 9 pm
Cost: FREE

Doors will open at 5:30 pm. The STEM Career Expo is free and open to students ages 12 and older and their families. Be sure to RSVP and beat the line. Check out photos from last year’s STEM Career Expo.

More than 20 community partners and colleges will inspire, give advice, and provide opportunities for youth.

Participating organizations include:
Hunter College
Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers
Seeds Scholars
Generation Code
Explainer TV
The SimpleBiologist
SUNY Maritime College
MakerState
CoderDojo NYC
Per Scholas
… and more!

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

High school and college students are invited to join us at NYSCI to explore opportunities that support women and girls along their STEM education and career pathways. STEM Night: Women in STEM Leadership will highlight the many ways women are taking important roles in shaping our future.

Listen to guest speakers, network with STEM leaders and professionals, explore educational and career opportunities, and engage in hands-on activities.

 

Guest Speakers:

(with more to be announced)

  • Vanessa Hill – Creator of PBS BrainCraft, a show exploring psychology, neuroscience and human behavior
  • Mireia Crispin – Research Fellow, Physicist at Memorial Sloan Ketterling
  • Zuleyma Peralta – Ph.D. Candidate at Icahn School of Medicine at Mont Sinai
  • Florence D. Hudson – Senior Vice President and Chief Innovation Officer at Internet2
  • Jennifer Shelton – Bioinformatics Programmer at New York Genome Center

 

STEM professionals and organizations, including:

– Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers
– LIU Brooklyn
– MakerState
– Hunter College
– iD Tech
– Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
– The Museum of Interesting Things
– Girls Who Code
– Explainer TV
– ScIQ
– Per Scholas
– Kate Bredbenner
– Barnard College
– Know Science
– NYCSPARX
– Columbia Engineering Outreach Programs

 

Get Involved
STEM professionals interested in sharing their experiences with students and joining this event, or educators with student groups who want to attend this event, please contact acanova@nysci.org for more information.

 

The STEM Night series is a program of NYSCI’s Alan J. Friedman Center for the Development of Young Scientists.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

High school and college students are invited to STEM Night to explore how design and engineering converge in our ever-changing world today. Explore the various educational and career opportunities there are in these fields!

Held in our Design Lab, students will engage in hands-on activities, hear from guest speakers who are experts in the field, and network with STEM professionals and organizations.


Featuring design and engineering professionals and organizations:
The New School
BlueStamp Engineering
Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers
LIU Brooklyn
MakerState
School of Engineering and Computer Sciences- New York Institute of Technology
New York University Tisch School of the Arts Interactive Telecommunications Program (ITP)
Ran Tian
José Vega-Cebrián (Sejo)
Yueping Wang

 

Get Involved
STEM professionals interested in sharing their experiences with students and joining this event, or educators with student groups who want to attend this event, please contact acanova@nysci.org for more information.

 

The STEM Night series is a program of NYSCI’s Alan J. Friedman Center for the Development of Young Scientists.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Join us at this special evening event, STEM Night: Making for the Community, to learn about the wide range of career opportunities available in the maker world. At this free event, you can engage in hands-on activities, hear from experts in the field through a panel discussion, and network with STEM professionals. Light refreshments will be provided.

STEM Night: Making for the Community will feature STEM professionals and organizations including:

• UM Project
• Columbia Maker Space
• MakerState
• Museum of Interesting Things
• Upperline Code
• Make Mode
• STEM Advancement Inc.

 

This event is geared towards high school and college students who are curious about careers in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM).

Chaperones are required for students under age 16. Please bring your student or teacher ID.

RSVP required. 

 

Get Involved: STEM professionals interested in sharing their experiences with students and joining this event, or educators with student groups who want to attend this event, please contact acanova@nysci.org for more information.

 

The STEM Night series is a program of NYSCI’s Alan J. Friedman Center for the Development of Young Scientists. 
NYSCI STEM Nights are made possible with support from the New York Life Foundation, The Neuberger Berman Foundation and Con Edison.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Transmissions ebook

Dengue, zika and chikungunya fever mosquito (aedes aegypti) on human skin

Zika, Ebola, West Nile virus. In today’s global, hyper-connected world, identifying emerging diseases requires scientists who not only have the skills and experience to gather evidence and conduct research, but also who have the persistence to continue their research in the face of a variety of obstacles.

Using lessons learned from persistent work done by a veterinary pathologist who helped identify West Nile Virus in 1999, NYSCI is creating an interactive comic ebook for middle school and high school students. The comic book will use a fictional storyline about five 9th graders. They work to investigate a mysterious disease, collect evidence, meet with scientists, and even time travel. The ebook aims to demystify how humans can get diseases that also infect birds and other animals.

The Transmissions ebook will be available to the public in 2018 and is funded by a prestigious Science Education Partnership Award (SEPA) from the National Institutes of Health.

 

This project was made possible by a Science Education Partnership Award (SEPA), Grant Number 1R25OD021906-01, from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

Research reported in this publication was supported by the Office Of The Director, National Institutes Of Health of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number R25OD021906. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Join us for a free evening of fun as you explore the range of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) opportunities that are available to you. Hear from professionals connecting with STEM in unexpected ways and learn more about the interesting work they are doing. Explore the programs that support your growing interest in STEM fields and engage in hands-on activities.

Designed for high school and college students, the STEM Career Expo highlights organizations, colleges, universities, professionals and companies involved in science, technology, engineering and math. More than 30 STEM-related organizations are expected to participate in the event, offering valuable insight and advice to students who attend. We are also partnering with one of our favorite local restaurants to give you a taste of Corona, Queens and keep you energized for the evening!

*Chaperones are required for students under age 16. Please bring your student or teacher ID.

 

At the STEM Career Expo, you can:

  • Use flight simulators with STEMPilot.
  • Send video postcards.
  • Take your photo at our green screen photobooth.
  • Find out about internship opportunities.
  • Tech Hacktivities
  • Learn about software development and programming JavaScript.
  • Discover STEM summer enrichment camps.
  • Find out about career opportunities in geoscience and learn about environmental science and geology degrees.
  • Get tips for creating a great resume, pitching yourself with an elevator speech, and networking with STEM professionals.

 

Get Involved:

STEM professionals interested in sharing their experiences with students and joining this event, or educators with student groups who want to attend this event, please contact acanova@nysci.org for more information.

 

Partner Organizations:

Adaptive Design Association
Big Show CM
The Browning School
Civil Air Patrol
CodeSpeak Labs
Columbia Space Initiative
Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health
CUNY Queens College
Digital Girl, Inc
EverFi
Explainer TV
The Graduate Center, CUNY
Green Mountain Energy
MakerState
Mercy College
MindRider NYU
Museum of the Moving Image
New York University
NYCSPARX Technology Program for Girls
Physics Department of Queens College
Queens College School of Earth & Environmental Sciences
Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers
STEM Kids NYC
STEMPilot
Tech Kids Unlimited
Upperline School of Code
Vidcode
Wildlife Conservation Society
Zoomdojo

 

The STEM Career Expo is a program of NYSCI’s Alan J. Friedman Center for the Development of Young Scientists. NYSCI’s STEM Career Expo is made possible with support from the New York Life Foundation, The Neuberger Berman Foundation and Con Edison.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Join us at this special evening event, STEM Night: The Future of Energy, to learn about the wide range of career opportunities available in energy, engineering and environmental science fields. At this free event, you can engage in hands-on activities, hear from experts in the field through a panel discussion, and network with STEM professionals. Light refreshments will be provided.

Panelists include:
Marie-Nicole Trimboli is a New York State licensed professional engineer and a graduate of The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art, where she received a Bachelor of Engineering degree specializing in mechanical Engineering. She is currently a senior planning analyst in Con Edison’s Steam Operations Planning group, responsible for natural gas planning, analysis for the steam generating stations, and technical projects. Before joining Con Edison, Marie worked at WSP Flack + Kurtz as a consulting engineer, designing HVAC systems for various projects.

Greg Hastings is an engineer at Consolidated Edison where he manages large-scale construction projects. In his time at Con Edison, Greg has overseen many construction projects including conversions of power plants from oil to natural gas, upgrades to reduce power plant emissions, extensive work on Con Edison’s transmission lines on the Queensboro Bridge, and multiple storm hardening upgrade projects resulting from Hurricane Sandy. Greg received a Bachelor of Civil Engineering from the University of Delaware and is currently pursuing his Master of Business Administration at New York University. He is also a graduate of Con Edison’s Growth Opportunities in Leadership Development (GOLD)Program and holds an Engineer in Training (EIT) certificate.

Alex de Sherbinin is the associate director for science applications at the Center for International Earth Science Information Network(CIESIN), an environmental data and analysis center within The Earth Institute at Columbia University, specializing in the human aspects of global environmental change. Dr. de Sherbinin is a geographer whose research interests focus on the human aspects of environmental change at local, national and global scales.
He holds a doctorate in geo-information science and earth observation from ITC at the University of Twente (Netherlands), and master’s and bachelor’s degrees in geography from Syracuse University and Dartmouth College, respectively. Prior to joining CIESIN, he served as a USAID Population-Environment Fellow with the Social Policy Program of International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN, Gland, Switzerland), and a population geographer at the Population Reference Bureau (PRB, Washington, DC). From 1984-1986 he served as an agricultural extension agent with the U.S. Peace Corpsin Mauritania, West Africa.

The following organizations will host informational tables at the event:
Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers
Vidcode
Solar One
SunWorks
Re-Nuble
NYC Citywide Administrative Services- Energy Management

This event is geared towards high school and college students who are curious about careers in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). Chaperones are required for students under age 16. Please bring your student or teacher ID. Free with RSVP.

RSVP required.

RSVP Now

 

Get Involved: STEM professionals interested in sharing their experiences with students and joining this event, or educators with student groups who want to attend this event, please contact acanova@nysci.org for more information.

 

The STEM Night series is a program of NYSCI’s Alan J. Friedman Center for the Development of Young Scientists.

STEM Night: The Future of Energy is presented by Con Edison.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

By David Wells.

I have been making things for as long as I can remember.

Has everything I made been a success? Certainly not! But as I look back on my experiential continuum, I notice a sense of self-efficacy. At the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) Maker Space, we call this the “I Can Mentality.”

I have gotten many miles out of this approach to problem solving. Though I may not be sure how to do something, I am sure that I can try.

Let me illustrate this with a story of a young maker in Experimental Sound Machine, our middle school program that focuses on the science of sound.

In true Maker Space fashion, we began our journey by deconstructing the challenge at hand. Our entry point to the science of sound was through musical instruments. We first asked two questions:

We answer these questions by dissecting the instruments:

– What is it?

– How does it work?

Through this deconstruction, we figure out that all musical instruments are systems of simpler parts, i.e the materials they are made of. And one of the inspiring discoveries is that they are typically made from the same materials!

This discovery often leads to the kids exploring the sonic quality of a wide variety of materials and expands the possibilities of what a musical instrument can be.

Enter Derek. Or that is what we will call him as we would like to protect his identity.

Derek was testing out the sonic possibilities of strings made from different materials. He made his selection and attempted to add it to his creation. I observed him as he tried to attach it to his instrument and noticed him struggling. I decided to ask him what was going on.

He shared that he couldn’t quite get the right amount of tension on the string because of its inherent elasticity. I suggested that he might consider trying another string and offered a few options. He quickly rebutted, “This one sounds better than those.”

Now let me take a step back and explain how we test the sound of a string in Maker Space: Wrap it around your finger a couple times, put that finger in your ear, pull the string taught, and pluck. If you have never tried it, I HIGHLY recommend as it will blow your mind!

I proceeded to test the options to hear for myself and found that Derek was absolutely correct.

My response was simple and direct: “OK, you are right. How can we make this work?”

We brainstormed possibilities and he went about his way. He eventually got to a point that I thought was a great improvement, but it did not meet his credentials. So he scrapped that idea and moved on.

Derek with his final Experimental Sound Machine.

Later, I was reflecting on how comfortable Derek was in telling me that his option sounded best. I was very impressed by this and thought about when I was his age, would I have been comfortable saying that to my teacher? Would I be comfortable saying that to a teacher now?

I might say no to both of those questions, but I feel it is contingent on the environment of the space you are in — is it set up for empowering people to think, to challenge, to explore, to discover? Does it encourage people to say, “I can do this!”? Learners of all ages need trust and permission to act.

The U.S. Department of Education recently announced the CTE Makeover Challenge, encouraging high schools to “design maker spaces that strengthen next-generation career and technical skills.” This is a fabulous concept. Our government is inspiring and supporting schools, students and teachers to work collaboratively to improve their learning environment based on what the community needs.

First, I would like to express my full support of this initiative; it has the potential to make a tremendous impact. Making is infectious. When someone else is making, it inspires others to want to make. In that way it is similar to laughter; when one laughs, others follow.

That being said, I think there needs to be an additional push for, and understanding of, the benefits of making in the classroom at all levels. This is a tall order. In a system as large as our national education system, we may need a Cambrian Explosion of sorts — a veritable educational structure explosion. This may seem a bit dramatic, but sometimes we need drama.

I would like to respond to the blog post on the CTE Makeover Challenge site. In the second paragraph, it states:

… in support of President Barack Obama’s Nation of Makers initiative, an all-hands-on-deck call to give students access to a new class of technologies — such as 3D printers, laser cutters, and desktop machine tools — that are enabling Americans to design, build, and manufacture just about anything.

This is a true statement. However, it focuses solely on students. Where are the teachers in all of this?

We need to set up the same learning environments for our teachers as we wish for our youth. It is vitally important to allow teachers to experiment and relive the feeling of being learners alongside their students, lessen the distance between what it means to be a teacher and a learner, and create multi-developmental learning groups within administration, faculty and student body.

In addition, though it’s favorable to make high-end tools like 3D printers accessible to all, it’s disadvantageous to see tools as an answer. Being a maker is a mindset, not a tool.

At Maker Space, we offer experiences that playfully explore concepts and materials/tools, where visitors creatively design and make things that have importance to them as well as their communities. Putting people at the center of their learning is a foundational concept in NYSCI’s Design-Make-Play philosophy.

A programmatic example of this is the National Science Foundation-funded Innovation Institute. This teen program focuses on designing and making products or processes that will benefit our local Corona community.

During the Innovation Institute, we seek out problems and collectively discuss potential ways to solve them. The teens explore ethnographic concepts through neighborhood walks, observations and reflections, and learn how to use tools to build prototypes. They also co-facilitate middle school programs with NYSCI staff, creating a connection between teaching and learning. They transfer their knowledge to a younger audience, providing a firsthand application to problem solving. The program culminates with the Innovation Institute interns showcasing their projects at World Maker Faire.

The Design-Make-Play philosophy is embedded in all of our programs and exhibits, including school group workshops, teacher professional developments, out-of-school time programs, exhibitions and public events. Through our philosophy and museum experiences, NYSCI actively supports the national initiatives the White House has been advocating.

So where does this leave us? All this is good. Yes. All this is going in the right direction. Yes. We should continue to be thoughtful in our approach and truly inclusive when considering major shifts in the educational landscape (formal and informal) and not fear the possibility of shaking things up a bit; maybe not quite an educational Cambrian explosion.

For now, let’s consider Derek. He was able to thrive, make decisions, make mistakes, and build a sense of autonomy, all because he was given permission to do so. This permission was partially achieved due to the environment we set up in NYSCI’s Maker Space, but getting permission from ourselves is elemental.

As NYSCI’s Director of Maker Programs, David Wells oversees maker-related programs and education initiatives, and manages the museum’s Maker Space. He serves on several advisory boards including Maker Ed and the Institute of Imagination in London. He also served as the project lead on NYSCI’s Makerzines, a series of three maker-related publications that can be downloaded for free.

To read about the programs and activities at NYSCI’s Maker Space, follow us on makerspace.nysci.org.