Monkey Spot Scavenger Hunts

Eat, Move & Hack 

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design-Make-Play. The defining characteristics of Design-Make-Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Gain new perspectives on the exhibits of NSYCI with three super fun Monkey Spot Scavenger Hunts. See what you can discover about eating, moving, and hacking.

Downloads are FREE.
Available for iPhone and Android!
 
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For Apple Products: Requires iOS 7.1 or later. Compatible with iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch.

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For Android: Requires 4.1 and up. Android users require a code to download the app. Please contact publicprograms@nysci.org for the code.

Eat
How can cooking and eating be more fun and healthy? Explore NYSCI to learn how food relates to energy and can be used as fuel to do more and better things.
 
Move
Learn about momentum, energy and different forms of transportation, and
discover the causes and effects of movement throughout NYSCI.

Hack
To hack is to be clever and creative, and to make things your own.
Use your ingenuity to see NYSCI in different ways.

Monkey Spot Scavenger Hunts turn any place into an adventure! The thought-provoking clues prompt kids to take photographs, ask questions, perform tricks, tell stories, and document the world and people around them. Along the way kids make discoveries, create art, and get to know people. Our ever-expanding library of scavenger hunts ranges from bedrooms, backyards, and restaurants to museums, zoos, and airports.

Monkey Bar Collective: Monkey Bar Collective is a game design and production company specializing in children’s games. Founders Amy Kraft and Sharon Bilman combined have 30 years experience making games for kids. Monkey Spot is our first homegrown original app.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design-Make-Play. The defining characteristics of Design-Make-Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Transmissions ebook

Dengue, zika and chikungunya fever mosquito (aedes aegypti) on human skin

Zika, Ebola, West Nile virus. In today’s global, hyper-connected world, identifying emerging diseases requires scientists who not only have the skills and experience to gather evidence and conduct research, but also who have the persistence to continue their research in the face of a variety of obstacles.

Using lessons learned from persistent work done by a veterinary pathologist who helped identify West Nile Virus in 1999, NYSCI is creating an interactive comic ebook for middle school and high school students. The comic book will use a fictional storyline about five 9th graders. They work to investigate a mysterious disease, collect evidence, meet with scientists, and even time travel. The ebook aims to demystify how humans can get diseases that also infect birds and other animals.

The Transmissions ebook will be available to the public in 2018 and is funded by a prestigious Science Education Partnership Award (SEPA) from the National Institutes of Health.

 

This project was made possible by a Science Education Partnership Award (SEPA), Grant Number 1R25OD021906-01, from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

Research reported in this publication was supported by the Office Of The Director, National Institutes Of Health of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number R25OD021906. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design-Make-Play. The defining characteristics of Design-Make-Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Maker Therapy makerspaces

Our Maker Therapy program has been highlighted by the White House as one of the nation’s major commitments to the National Week of Making and President Obama’s Nation of Makers Initiative. The Maker Therapy approach brings mobile makerspaces into hospitals to address the needs of chronically ill patients.

Over the next year, Maker Therapy will be implemented at Children’s Hospital of Colorado, with leadership support from Cognizant, as well as at hospitals in New York and Florida. Through access to mobile in-hospital makerspaces, this program will give children at these hospitals:

  • Increased independence within hospital environments.
  • Increased access to creative outlets and learning opportunities.
  • Additional encouragement for social interchange with others.
  • Additional opportunities for increased physical mobility, all of which have been shown to contribute to the overall patient health and mental wellbeing.

To help spread the word about the program, Dr. Gokul Krishnan, the innovator behind Maker Therapy, spoke at Cognizant Community 2016, an impressive gathering of thought leaders who are shaping technology’s new role in business. There he discussed how making can provide hospital-bound kids with outlets for their creativity, empowering them to feel a renewed sense of purpose and improving their health.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design-Make-Play. The defining characteristics of Design-Make-Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

eat move hack health

Come to NYSCI for scavenger hunts, demonstrations, workshops and information during Rocket Park Recess. Gain a new perspective on eating, moving and hacking, as we take visitors on a tour of the museum with a different lens, supported by super fun Monkey Spot scavenger hunts by Monkey Bar Collective and activities and workshops under our Rocket Park Recess tent. You’ll leave with new ideas about our exhibits, but also how to enjoy your summer break more as you eat, move and hack for health. Free with NYSCI admission, unless otherwise noted.

 

July 22: Rocket Park Recess: Eat
How can cooking and eating be more fun and healthy? Learn how to make a yummy, good-for-you snack and reimagine how food relates to energy and can be used as fuel to do more and better things this summer. Free with NYSCI admission.

Monkey Spot Scavenger Hunt: Explore NYSCI to see food as fuel and how it powers all living things.

Easy-to-make fun and delicious recipes: 12:30 pm and 2:30 pm

 

July 29: Rocket Park Recess: Move
Learn about momentum, energy and different forms of transportation at workshops that teach different and fun ways to move and exercise. Free with NYSCI admission.

Monkey Spot Scavenger Hunt: Discover the causes and effects of movement throughout NYSCI.

Open session parkour obstacle course with The Movement Creative: Try out The Movement Creative’s obstacle course and learn the basics of Parkour, a playful platform of movement that encourages interaction between our bodies and environment, and encourages curiosity, experimentation, strength-building, self-confidence and healthy living.  All ages and levels of fitness are welcome. Sneakers/rubber soles are recommended.

 

August 5: Rocket Park Recess: Hack
To hack is to be clever and creative, and to make things your own. Meet creative hackers and learn new tools for putting your own stamp on different aspects of your life. Most activities are free with NYSCI admission.

Monkey Spot Scavenger Hunt: Use your ingenuity to see NYSCI in different ways.  

Open session parkour obstacle course with The Movement Creative: Try out The Movement Creative’s obstacle course and learn the basics of Parkour, a playful platform of movement that encourages interaction between our bodies and environment, and encourages curiosity, experimentation, strength-building, self-confidence and healthy living.  All ages and levels of fitness are welcome. Sneakers/rubber soles are recommended.

“This is What a Scientist Looks Like” with LabCandyNYSCI has invited LabCandy to Rocket Park Recess to reimagine what a scientist looks like. Founded three years ago by a Yale undergraduate, LabCandy is social venture with the mission to cultivate children’s (especially girls’) interest in science by showing them that the field has room for them. Join LabCandy CEO, Olivia Pavco-Giaccia, with her funky lab gear and lessons of kid-power, for an afternoon of colorful fun. Work with LabCandy against the nerdy STEM stereotype, and become what a scientist looks like!

12:30pmStory time with Olivia Pavco-Giaccia: Join LabCandy’s engaging CEO, as she reads from her interactivity book, “Ava and the Copper Key,” and demonstrates an experiment from the book.

1-2pm“Hack a Scientist Workshop”: Work with LabCandy and use different materials to transform a set of goggles, an essential part of the the ‘science uniform,’ that represents you and your unique style as an amateur scientist in the making. Fee: $6/$4 for members

2pm – Science Fashion Show: Workshop participants will have the opportunity to show off the goggles made during the “Hack a Scientist” workshop, while wearing some of LabCandy’s designs.

 

Rocket Park Recess 2016 Partners:

Monkey Bar Collective: Monkey Bar Collective offers a full range of content creation and production services with a specialty in media for kids. Clients have included Scholastic, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Microsoft, Spin Master, and Storied Myth.

The Movement Creative: The Movement Creative is a social enterprise dedicated to positively changing the city in which we live through parkour, movement education, and design.

LabCandy: Founded three years ago by a Yale undergraduate, LabCandy is a social venture whose mission is to change the faces of science by empowering young girls in STEM.

 

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design-Make-Play. The defining characteristics of Design-Make-Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Join us in Rocket Park for scavenger hunts (with prizes!), demos, information and workshops about making health and fitness easy, fun and delicious. Learn helpful tips for a more healthy life, gain important skills for improving your fitness level, and join us in destroying the damaging myths surrounding food and exercise. Each week will feature a special workshop related to healthy eating or movement. Free with NYSCI admission unless otherwise noted.

Rocket Park Recess will take place on the following days from noon – 4 pm:

Friday, August 14

 

Workshop Schedule:

 

August 14 – Circus Warehouse and Adventure to Fitness

    • 12 – 4 pm: Adventure in Fitness video workout screenings in Viscusi
    • 12:30 & 1:30 pm: 5 minute Circus Warehouse acts/demonstrations
    • 3 – 4 pm: Stretching: The Road to Contortion with Kira Fath of Circus Warehouse
      Circus Warehouse, a professional circus arts training facility in Long Island City, presents contortionist Kira Fath. In this one-hour workshop, Kira will teach stretching as a way to stay fit and as a necessary addition to general health. Participants will work on beginner stretching moves, back bending, learning to get into a split and a series of exercises that they can do at home to improve flexibility. Recommended for ages 8 and older. $6 per person,  plus NYSCI admission. (Members: $4 per person.) Limited capacity.

Book Workshop Now

 

No prior experience is required for the workshops. Please wear comfortable clothing and rubber soled shoes. 

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design-Make-Play. The defining characteristics of Design-Make-Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Join us in Rocket Park for scavenger hunts (with prizes!), demos, information and workshops about making health and fitness easy, fun and delicious. Learn helpful tips for a more healthy life, gain important skills for improving your fitness level, and join us in destroying the damaging myths surrounding food and exercise. Each week will feature a special workshop related to healthy eating or movement. Free with NYSCI admission unless otherwise noted.

Rocket Park Recess will take place on the following days from noon – 4 pm:

Friday, August 14

 

Workshop Schedule:

 

August 14 – Circus Warehouse and Adventure to Fitness

    • 12 – 4 pm: Adventure in Fitness video workout screenings in Viscusi
    • 12:30 & 1:30 pm: 5 minute Circus Warehouse acts/demonstrations
    • 3 – 4 pm: Stretching: The Road to Contortion with Kira Fath of Circus Warehouse
      Circus Warehouse, a professional circus arts training facility in Long Island City, presents contortionist Kira Fath. In this one-hour workshop, Kira will teach stretching as a way to stay fit and as a necessary addition to general health. Participants will work on beginner stretching moves, back bending, learning to get into a split and a series of exercises that they can do at home to improve flexibility. Recommended for ages 8 and older. $6 per person,  plus NYSCI admission. (Members: $4 per person.) Limited capacity.

Book Workshop Now

 

No prior experience is required for the workshops. Please wear comfortable clothing and rubber soled shoes. 

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design-Make-Play. The defining characteristics of Design-Make-Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Join us in Rocket Park for scavenger hunts (with prizes!), demos, information and workshops about making health and fitness easy, fun and delicious. Learn helpful tips for a more healthy life, gain important skills for improving your fitness level, and join us in destroying the damaging myths surrounding food and exercise. Each week will feature a special workshop related to healthy eating or movement. Free with NYSCI admission unless otherwise noted.

Rocket Park Recess will take place on the following days from noon – 4 pm:

Friday, August 14

 

Workshop Schedule:

 

August 14 – Circus Warehouse and Adventure to Fitness

    • 12 – 4 pm: Adventure in Fitness video workout screenings in Viscusi
    • 12:30 & 1:30 pm: 5 minute Circus Warehouse acts/demonstrations
    • 3 – 4 pm: Stretching: The Road to Contortion with Kira Fath of Circus Warehouse
      Circus Warehouse, a professional circus arts training facility in Long Island City, presents contortionist Kira Fath. In this one-hour workshop, Kira will teach stretching as a way to stay fit and as a necessary addition to general health. Participants will work on beginner stretching moves, back bending, learning to get into a split and a series of exercises that they can do at home to improve flexibility. Recommended for ages 8 and older. $6 per person,  plus NYSCI admission. (Members: $4 per person.) Limited capacity.

Book Workshop Now

 

No prior experience is required for the workshops. Please wear comfortable clothing and rubber soled shoes. 

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design-Make-Play. The defining characteristics of Design-Make-Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Join us in Rocket Park for scavenger hunts (with prizes!), demos, information and workshops about making health and fitness easy, fun and delicious. Learn helpful tips for a more healthy life, gain important skills for improving your fitness level, and join us in destroying the damaging myths surrounding food and exercise. Each week will feature a special workshop related to healthy eating or movement. Free with NYSCI admission unless otherwise noted.

Rocket Park Recess will take place on the following days from noon – 4 pm:

Friday, July 31
Friday, August 7
Friday, August 14

 

Workshop Schedule:

July 31 – The Movement Creative
    • 12 – 4 pm: Free Group workout on The Movement Creative’s obstacle course
 

August 7 – The Movement Creative
    • 12 – 4 pm: Free Group workout on The Movement Creative’s obstacle course
 

  • 12 – 4 pm: Adventure in Fitness video workout screenings in Viscusi
  • 12:30 & 1:30 pm: 5 minute Circus Warehouse acts/demonstrations
  • 3 – 4 pm: CW workshop (TBA )-12 spots available (recommended for 8 years and older) per workshop: $6/$4 for members

 

No prior experience is required for the workshops. Please wear comfortable clothing and rubber soled shoes. 

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design-Make-Play. The defining characteristics of Design-Make-Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Join us in Rocket Park for scavenger hunts (with prizes!), demos, information and workshops about making health and fitness easy, fun and delicious. Learn helpful tips for a more healthy life, gain important skills for improving your fitness level, and join us in destroying the damaging myths surrounding food and exercise. Each week will feature a special workshop related to healthy eating or movement. Free with NYSCI admission unless otherwise noted.

Rocket Park Recess will take place on the following days from noon – 4 pm:

Friday, July 17
Friday, July 24
Friday, July 31
Friday, August 7
Friday, August 14

 

Workshop Schedule:

 

    • 12 – 4 pm: Build a Brain: Make and color brain hats while learning about the location and function of each lobe of the brain, while learning about how to have a healthy brain and why.
    • 12 – 1:30 pm: Free Group workout on The Movement Creative’s obstacle course
    • 2 & 3 pm: 45-min Parkour workshops. (20 spots available per workshop) – $6/$4 for members
       
      Book Parkour Workshops

 

  • 12 – 4 pm: Adventure in Fitness video workout screenings in Viscusi
  • 12:30 & 1:30 pm: 5 minute Circus Warehouse live demo with Team Circus: Brian Lugo and Annette Santiago
  • 3 – 4 pm: Partner Balancing with Team Circus: Annette Santiago and Brian Lugo. The talented pair will be teaching elementary partner balancing as a way to stay fit and also to impress all of your friends! Participants will work on short balancing sequences, channeling their own strength and agility and learning some basics of body control. 12 spots available (recommended for 8 years and older) per workshop: $6/$4 for members

 

    • 12 – 1:30 pm: Free Group workout on The Movement Creative’s obstacle course
    • 2 & 3 pm: 45-min Parkour workshops. (20 spots available per workshop) – $6/$4 for members
       
      Book Parkour Workshops

 

August 7 – The Movement Creative
    • 12 – 1:30 pm: Free Group workout on The Movement Creative’s obstacle course
    • 2 & 3 pm: 45-min Parkour workshops. (20 spots available per workshop) – $6/$4 for members
       
      Book Parkour Workshops

 

  • 12 – 4 pm: Adventure in Fitness video workout screenings in Viscusi
  • 12:30 & 1:30 pm: 5 minute Circus Warehouse acts/demonstrations
  • 3 – 4 pm: CW workshop (TBA )-12 spots available (recommended for 8 years and older) per workshop: $6/$4 for members

 

No prior experience is required for the workshops. Please wear comfortable clothing and rubber soled shoes. 

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design-Make-Play. The defining characteristics of Design-Make-Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

There is a sense of panic in some communities about how to deal with people who come to the US from West Africa, specifically counties that are experiencing the Ebola epidemic. The governors of New York and New Jersey backed off from requiring returning health care workers to be quarantined for three weeks regardless if they were showing any symptoms of the disease, a child in Connecticut has been bared from school for three weeks because she traveled to Africa but none of the Ebola ravaged countries. And now Louisiana is proposing to keep scientists from a meeting where public health measures and science about containing the Ebola epidemic are more likely to be discussed than in the Louisiana legislature. In the New York Times there is anecdotal evidence that some health care workers at Bellevue are wary of treating an Ebola infected doctor or of co-workers who are treating him. Clearly there is something wrong with how the message about Ebola is getting through. And telling people about the wonders of American medicine is not the way to do this.

A problem is that states have supremacy in setting public health standards so we could have different standards in each of the states while the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC&P) has only an advisory role to play. Unfortunately we are in an election year and politics may play more of a role than science. Ebola is diagnosed by a spiking fever and then by blood analysis for presence of virus, travel to West Africa and past exposure to the virus. Panic arises. There have been a number of mishaps due to missed clues, lack of experience in dealing with such a highly infectious disease (with approaching an 80% mortality rate in Africa), and misunderstanding or not paying attention to the science.

 

What does science know about the transmission of Ebola?

Ebola can only be transmitted in body fluids by direct contact.

What are body fluids?

Ebola has been detected in blood and many body fluids. Body fluids include saliva, mucus, vomit, feces, sweat, tears, breast milk, urine, and semen.

What does “direct contact” mean?

Direct contact means that body fluids (blood, saliva, mucus, vomit, urine, or feces) from an infected person (alive or dead) have touched someone’s eyes, nose, or mouth or an open cut, wound, or abrasion.

How long does Ebola live outside the body?

Ebola is killed with hospital-grade disinfectants (such as household bleach). Ebola on dry surfaces, such as doorknobs and countertops, can survive for several hours; however, virus in body fluids (such as blood) can survive up to several days at room temperature. Or until the liquid evaporates.

Are patients who recover from Ebola immune for life? Can they get it again—the same or a different strain?

Recovery from Ebola depends on good supportive clinical care and a patient’s immune response. Available evidence shows that people who recover from Ebola infection develop antibodies that last for at least 10 years, possibly longer.

We don’t know if people who recover are immune for life or if they can become infected with a different species of Ebola.

If someone survives Ebola, can he or she still spread the virus?

Once someone recovers from Ebola, they can no longer spread the virus. However, Ebola virus has been found in semen for up to 3 months. Abstinence from sex (including oral sex) is recommended for at least 3 months. If abstinence is not possible, condoms may help prevent the spread of disease.

Can Ebola be spread through mosquitos?

There is no evidence that mosquitos or other insects can transmit Ebola virus. Only mammals (for example, humans, bats, monkeys and apes) have shown the ability to spread and become infected with Ebola virus.

My suggestion is to get your flu shot early. More people in the US die of complications of flu than are anticipated for this Ebola virus in Africa.

 

Ebola controls at US medical meeting spark protest

Researchers say that exclusion of those recently in affected areas could undermine Ebola response

30 October 2014, Nature.

Morgana Wingard/USAID

Health-care workers who have been working in Ebola-affected nations such as Liberia have been asked not to travel to New Orleans, Louisiana, to attend a major medical meeting.

Scientists are protesting against the state of Louisiana’s decision to effectively ban people who have recently returned from Ebola-affected areas from attending a major meeting in New Orleans.

On 29 October, Louisiana officials told organizers of the annual meeting of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene that recent returnees from the three West African nations most affected by the Ebola outbreak would be asked not to attend the meeting, which is to be held from 2 to 6 November.

The move could hamper efforts to control the Ebola outbreak, says Christopher Plowe, incoming president of the society and head of malaria research at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore.

”This meeting is a place for people who are working on Ebola to share the latest information and go back better prepared to fight the epidemic,” Plowe says. ”There is a potential hindrance to that effort of people not being able to come to the meeting.”

The policy goes beyond guidelines issued on 27 October by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which require people to quarantine themselves only if they have symptoms of Ebola virus disease (EVD) or known exposure to the virus. Louisiana, however, has asked that anyone who has been to Ebola-affected countries in West Africa stay away from the meeting.

“We have requested that any individuals that will be traveling to Louisiana following a trip to the West African countries of Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone or have had contact with an EVD-infected individual remain in a self-quarantine for the 21 days following their relevant travel history,” wrote Kathy Kleibert, the secretary of the state’s department of health and hospitals, and Kevin Davis, director of the Governor’s Office of Homeland Security & Emergency Preparedness, in a letter dated 28 October.

“Given that conference participants with a travel and exposure history for EVD are recommended not to participate in large group settings (such as this conference) or to utilize public transport, we see no utility in you traveling to New Orleans to simply be confined to your room,” the letter states.

However visitors/scientists to European meetings are not being asked not to attend or would face being placed in quarantine.

Critical response

The society notified all meeting attendees of the policy in an e-mail on 28 October. Some researchers have already cancelled their trips. Piero Olliaro, head of intervention and implementation research on neglected tropical diseases at the World Health Organization in Geneva, Switzerland, and a visiting professor at the University of Oxford, UK, was scheduled to present research at the meeting on malaria and the parasitic disease schistosomiasis. He returned to Oxford from a trip to Guinea on 22 October, where he was part of a team that was scouting locations for clinical trials of experimental Ebola drugs. He says that he wore protective equipment when visiting treatment centres, has no fever or other symptoms of EVD and, according to CDC guidelines, need not be restricted from public gatherings.

“Public health should be based on evidence, and this policy is clearly not guided by evidence,” Olliaro says. “The only effect that this and other similar measures in the United States could have is do discourage people from volunteering and going to aid the response.”

Other states have also drawn criticism for overly strict policies. Last week New York and New Jersey announced mandatory quarantines for all health-care workers returning from West Africa. But on Sunday the two states relaxed their rules to allow returned health-care workers to spend 21 days at home, noting that there is no evidence that people without symptoms of the disease can infect others. Louisiana officials seem not to be contesting this fact.

From a medical perspective, asymptomatic individuals are not at risk of exposing others; however, the State is committed to preventing any unnecessary exposure of Ebola to the general public,” Kleibert and Davis wrote.

Travel cancellations

Médecins Sans Frontières (also known as Doctors Without Borders) confirmed that its tropical-medicines adviser, Estrella Lasry, will no longer attend the meeting because she recently returned from Liberia. Nature also confirmed travel cancellations by other US and UK-based researchers who were not able to speak publicly about the travel ban.

Researchers who are still planning to attend the meeting lamented the decision.

“It is a real shame, as many people that cannot attend are on the front line or were recently and we will not be able to learn from their experiences,” says malaria researcher Kristin Banek, who is based at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, UK.

“People need to share their experiences in attempting to control the outbreak and treat patients,” says virologist Robert Garry of Tulane University in New Orleans. “This will interfere with that. Repeating the same mistakes over again is not a good formula for success.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design-Make-Play. The defining characteristics of Design-Make-Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Ebola has now infected about 9,000 people and killed nearly 4,500, including 263 health care workers, the World Health Organization reported Wednesday. These numbers are probably an underestimate, WHO officials said.

Disease transmission is still rampant in Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone, although in some parts of those countries the number of new cases is falling. Those improvements are welcome, but overall the numbers of cases and deaths continue to climb. Countries must work to stamp Ebola out entirely, said WHO assistant director-general Bruce Aylward in a call with reporters on Tuesday. “This is Ebola. It is a horrible, unforgiving disease. You’ve got to get down to zero” cases, he said.

Senegal and Nigeria are poised to declare victory over the deadly virus. In August, a Guinean man got sick with the virus while staying with relatives in Senegal. No one else fell ill, and tests on September 5 showed the man is no longer infected. On Friday, Senegal will reach 42 days without a new case, a benchmark that WHO uses to determine whether a country is Ebola-free.

Nigeria will reach that goal on Monday. Officials are tracking 891 contacts of Nigeria’s 20 Ebola patients. Those contacts have already remained disease-free well past the virus’s incubation period of 21 days.

Suppression in sight

ebola_virus_2_860free

Ebola viruses (red) grow from the surface of a monkey cell (blue) in this scanning electron micrograph. Containing the virus has been difficult in West Africa, but some countries are on their way toward becoming Ebola-free.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design-Make-Play. The defining characteristics of Design-Make-Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Sixty girls, aged 11–14, are measuring, designing and dancing their way to healthier choices.

It’s all part of NYSCI’s GROOVE program, a free camp related to health and wellness education. During the three-week camp, the girls will work together on hands-on science activities, measure their steps using pedometers, make simple recipes, design healthy menus, and learn dance routines and other fun ways to be physically active. They will also learn about health careers, healthy eating, and physical activity. By being exposed to this information, the girls will be empowered to make healthy choices that will give them energy to do the things they want to do.

This is the second year of GROOVE, which stands for Girls Realizing Options through OpenSim Virtual Experiences. The program is a partnership between NYSCI, the University of Miami, and the Patricia Phillip Frost Museum of Science, and it is part of a National Institutes for Health-funded research project.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design-Make-Play. The defining characteristics of Design-Make-Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Join NYSCI for scavenger hunts (with prizes), demos, information and workshops about making health and fitness easy, fun and delicious. Learn helpful tips for a more healthy life, gain important skills for improving your fitness level, and learn about the damaging myths surrounding food and exercise.

Each day will feature a special workshop related to healthy eating or movement:

July 11: Parkour Workshops with the Movement Creative
Noon – 2:30 pm drop-in sessions; 3 pm workshop; sign up the day of for 3 pm workshop.

July 18: Parkour Workshops with the Movement Creative
Noon – 2:30 pm drop-in sessions; 3 pm workshop; sign up the day of for 3 pm workshop.

August 1: Make and Eat Healthy Snacks
Noon & 2 pm.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design-Make-Play. The defining characteristics of Design-Make-Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

NYSCI will bring a slice of the museum to Flushing Meadows Corona Park with free activities and information providing a sampling of its summer 2014 highlights. Features include: Get Fit with NYSCI: A pop-up tent with information and demos about how exercise and keeping fit keeps us healthy. Visitors can participate in hands-on demos and/or join free exercise sessions that will run throughout the day and continue at NYSCI throughout the summer; and Design Space: Learn about NYSCI’s newest experiential exhibition, Design Lab, as you build with your family, using dowels and rubber bands. Free.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design-Make-Play. The defining characteristics of Design-Make-Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Today’s featured book: Jonas Salk and the Polio Vaccine by Katherine Krohn ; illustrated by Al Milgrom.
An account of Dr. Jonas Salk’s work to find a vaccine to prevent polio, a deadly disease that had been plaguing the U.S. and other countries throughout the first half of the twentieth century. Presented in graphic format.