Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design-Make-Play. The defining characteristics of Design-Make-Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Young designers will explore the possibilities in planning, design, and construction. Learn about different materials needed to construct buildings, and use everyday materials to make the tallest and sturdiest tower.

Join us for hands-on science experiments and sensory-rich projects in workshops specially designed for children, ages 5–7, with autism spectrum disorder and their parents and siblings.

Science Scouts workshops include a small teacher-to-student ratio as students practice focusing/concentration, social cognition, collaboration/teamwork, listening/comprehension skills and more. Our educators are trained to work with kids with differences.

These free workshops provide opportunities to enjoy family time at the museum in a welcoming, safe and understanding environment, allow parents to network with one another, and help families discover the wonder of science learning together. Materials will include visual schedules, a communication booklet and more.

Sometimes creativity can get messy, so please dress your young scientist (and yourself) in old clothing that can be splattered.

 

To register and for more information, call 718-683-9366 or email dmeza@nysci.orgPreregistration is required.

 

This program is free for families and is made possible through generous support from the Jesse and Joan Kupferberg Foundation.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design-Make-Play. The defining characteristics of Design-Make-Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

The Art of Science 2014 showcases images of artistic merit created during the course of scientific research. The exhibition spurs debate among artists about the nature of art, opens scientists to new ways of “seeing” their own research, and serves as a window through which the general public can appreciate both art and science. These images were chosen from more than 250 submissions from undergraduates, graduate students, postdocs, staff and alumni representing more than 25 different departments at Princeton University. They span the fields of electrical engineering, ecology, evolution, chemistry and biology with images of termites, cockroaches, fruit flies and geological structures.

Featured Photo
Watermarks by Sara Sadri, postdoc, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Princeton University.

“Watermarks” is by Sara Sadri (postdoctoral researcher). Water can erode rock, carve through cliffs, and sculpt sand. Water moving back and forth on the Atlantic coast created this intricate pattern. As a hydrologist, I am fascinated by the natural phenomena of our beautiful planet. The way water in this picture found its way back to the ocean reminded me of a peacock’s tail spreading under the sun or a woman’s hair blowing in the wind.

Free with NYSCI admission.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design-Make-Play. The defining characteristics of Design-Make-Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Although 3D printed prosthetics have in the past been assembled by children as young as 9 years old, designing such functional mechanical devices has typically been the realm of experienced 3D designers – until now! Come and join us as we build 3D printed grabbers, whose files have been created by 5th graders remixing or “hacking” existing Raptor Hand files to create unique devices of their own.

Recommended for ages 10 and older.

Workshops will take place at 2 pm, 2:15 pm, 2:30 pm, 2:45 pm, 3 pm, 3:15 pm, 3:30 pm & 3:45 pm.

Space is limited. Advance purchase is recommended.

 

Engineering Week
Engineering Week kicks off with Engineering Day on Monday, February 20, with a day of activities and tables run by the American Society of Civil Engineers. Engineering Week continues throughout the week of February 20 – 24 to cover different engineering concepts – from 3D printing prosthetics to solving urban risks with geoseismic engineering – accompanied by activities and challenges to put those ideas into practice in NYSCI’s Design Lab.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design-Make-Play. The defining characteristics of Design-Make-Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

3D Printing – It’s no longer just about Yoda heads, key chains and iPhone cases any more.

Come and join Rich Lehrer, a pioneer in the use of authentic 3D printing initiatives to inspire and engage students, as he shows NYSCI visitors how kids can become involved in 3D printing projects that are helping to make the world a better place. Learn about creating 3D printed assistive devices, try out 3D printed prosthetics, and even build a simple but unique grabber created by “hacking” the files of a 3D printable “Raptor Hand”

 

Schedule

  • Try Out Demo Hands, (noon – 4 pm)
    3D printing allows for the creation of cheap and customizable devices for children with upper limb differences. Come and try out larger “demo versions” of these hands
  • Film Screenings, (noon – 4 pm)
    View a selection of short videos exploring Rich’s 3D printed assistive device projects and the overall 3D printed prosthetics movement.
  • Engineering 3D Printed Assistive Devices – Kids Creating Solutions to Authentic Problems, (1 pm)
    In this presentation, Rich Lehrer, a pioneer in the use authentic 3D printing education projects, will describe how this technology is revolutionizing STEM, empathy and design education. Rich will outline his use of 3D printed prosthetics projects to engage and inspire kids, share Brookwood School’s groundbreaking MS/Seniors Design Collaborations, and will provide concrete steps for turning students into engineers.
  • “Raptor Hacking” – Creating Unique “Grabber Devices” by Modifying the Files for 3D Printed Prosthetics, Workshops from (2 – 4:30 pm)
    *Registration Required
    $4/$2 members, ages 10+
    Register Now 

    Although 3D printed prosthetics have in the past been assembled by children as young as 9-years-old, designing such functional mechanical devices has typically been the realm of experienced 3D designers … until now. Join us as we build 3D Printed Grabbers, whose files have been created by 5th graders remixing or “hacking” existing Raptor Hand files to create unique devices of their own.

 

Bio
Rich Lehrer is the innovation coordinator at Brookwood School (Manchester-By-The-Sea, Massachusetts), a national faculty member for the Buck Institute for Education, a facilitator in project and design-based learning for the Principals’ Training Center, and the former education coordinator for the Enable Community Foundation. In 2013, Rich broke some interesting ground when he worked alongside 12 Brookwood students in a yearlong project to become one of the first school groups to build a functional 3D printed device for a child: in this case, Rich’s son, Max. He has since gone on to become a leader in the use of 3D printing to create authentic problem solving experiences for students.

 

Links

 

Thanks to the following:

  • Peter Graven and his students at Deer Creek Intermediate School in St. Francis, Wis. for their help printing and creating the 3D printed “empathy hands.”
  • Brookwood School in Manchester-By-The-Sea, Mass. for the use of their printers to create hands and “Grab-Tor” components.

 

Engineering Week
Engineering Week kicks off with Engineering Day on Monday, February 20, with a day of activities and tables run by the American Society of Civil Engineers. Engineering Week continues throughout the week of February 20 – 24 to cover different engineering concepts – from 3D printing prosthetics to solving urban risks with geoseismic engineering – accompanied by activities and challenges to put those ideas into practice in NYSCI’s Design Lab.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design-Make-Play. The defining characteristics of Design-Make-Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Narrated by Academy Award winner Jeff Bridges, Dream Big: Engineering Our World will transform how you think about engineering. From the Great Wall of China and the world’s tallest buildings, to underwater robots, solar cars and smart, sustainable cities, Dream Big celebrates the human ingenuity behind engineering marvels big and small, and shows how engineers push the limits of innovation in unexpected and amazing ways. With its inspiring stories of human grit and aspiration, and extraordinary visuals, Dream Big reveals the compassion and creativity that drive engineers to create better lives for people and a more sustainable future for us all. 42 minutes.

DREAM BIG is a MacGillivray Freeman film produced in partnership with American Society of Civil Engineers and presented by Bechtel Corporation.

$6 adults, $5 children, students and seniors, plus NYSCI admission.
(Members: $4 per person; free for Family Explorer members.)

Schedule:
Weekdays, 2 pm

Buy Tickets

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design-Make-Play. The defining characteristics of Design-Make-Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Learn about civil engineering through interactive games, construction challenges and hands-on activities presented by the Metropolitan Section of the American Society of Civil Engineers and NYSCI Explainers.

 
Activities include:

  • Gumdrop Dome: Build a dome using gumdrops and toothpicks. Test how much weight your dome can support.
  • Topple-A-Tug: Design your own boat made out of aluminum foil and see how many pennies it can hold without sinking.
  • Paper Bridge: Build a bridge using paper, wooden blocks and paper clips. See how much weight it can hold before it collapses.
  • Paper Tower: Design and build a tower at least 10 inches high using index cards and paper clips. See if your tower can withstand a weight placed on top. (Hint: You can fold the index cards into any shape you want to increase their strength.)
  • Truss Bridge: Using West Point Bridge Designer software, design the least expensive truss bridge that will pass a simulated load test.
  • Jenga: Build the tallest possible tower of blocks before the tower falls over.

 

Engineering Week
Engineering Week kicks off with Engineering Day on Monday, February 20, with a day of activities and tables run by the American Society of Civil Engineers. Engineering Week continues throughout the week of February 20 – 24 to cover different engineering concepts – from 3D printing prosthetics to solving urban risks with geoseismic engineering – accompanied by activities and challenges to put those ideas into practice in NYSCI’s Design Lab.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design-Make-Play. The defining characteristics of Design-Make-Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Engineering Week kicks off with Engineering Day on Monday, February 20, with a day of activities and tables run by the American Society of Civil Engineers. Engineering Week continues throughout the week to cover different engineering concepts—from 3D printing prosthetics to solving urban risks with geo-seismic engineering—accompanied by activities and challenges to put those ideas into practice in NYSCI’s Design Lab.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design-Make-Play. The defining characteristics of Design-Make-Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) integrate engineering into every grade level from kindergarten through 12th grade. Yet, at the elementary and middle school levels, in particular, most teachers do not have backgrounds or expertise in engineering. Even if they would love to teach it, many say they lack the resources and support to prepare students to be proficient in engineering and inspire them to pursue careers in engineering fields. To address these rapidly growing needs, Accelerate Learning™ and NYSCI have joined forces to develop a new solution called STEMscopes™ DIVE In Engineering.

“The best way to teach engineering isn’t from a textbook; it’s with hands-on, inquiry-based experiences,” said Dr. Vernon Johnson, president and CEO of Accelerate Learning. “For decades, NYSCI has been creating hands-on, energetic educational experiences where learners can indulge their curiosity and nurture their creativity. From the Design Lab to Maker Space Workshops to Design-Make-Play STEM Institutes, NYSCI has deep expertise in engineering and design, and in creating content and experiences that are engaging for students and teachers alike. We’re delighted to collaborate with a true thought leader in STEM to bring STEMscopes DIVE In Engineering to life.”

“There’s a great synergy between STEMscopes and the types of solutions NYSCI develops. However, one of the things that really drew us to Accelerate Learning was the company’s thoughtful approach to supporting teachers. They not only provide the curriculum and tools to meet teachers where they are now, they provide the embedded support teachers need to continuously improve how they teach STEM,” said Margaret Honey, president and CEO of NYSCI. “Our partnership with Accelerate Learning will result in an engineering curriculum that will be used in schools across the country, and get young students engaged in engineering and design and inventing the future.”

STEMscopes DIVE In Engineering will be part of Accelerate Learning’s award-winning STEMscopes PreK–12 product suite, which is built from the ground up to address the NGSS and today’s state standards. The online, comprehensive, hands-on engineering curriculum for grades 3–8 will be available for the 2017-2018 school year.

For more information, visit acceleratelearning.com or call toll-free 800-531-0864.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design-Make-Play. The defining characteristics of Design-Make-Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

An interview with NYSCI’s Inaugural Design Fellow, Deren Guler.

After finishing her degree in physics, Deren went on to become a fellow at NYSCI, where she has been developing the prototypes for her DIY electronic kits designed for young children.

As part of her fellowship, Deren facilitates workshops to deploy existing and new design and learning kits related to her Teknikio company but tailored to NYSCI’s current and developing audiences.

Through conversations with NYSCI’s Public Programming staff, Deren will craft workshops combining her skills and research with information regarding programming needs and audience specifics.

The Design Fellowship provides an opportunity for Guler to develop her new design and science-related kit content and rigor through public workshops and feedback/prototyping with NYSCI staff.

For more about Deren and Teknikio visit: http://www.teknikio.com/

MUSIC
“Allada” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

VIDEO
Produced by Bec Susan Gill and Jayde Lovell for ‘Did Someone Say Science?’

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Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design-Make-Play. The defining characteristics of Design-Make-Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

In this episode, Mariel interviews female pilot and engineer, Pauline Parent, from Dassault Falcon Jet in Teterboro Airport, New Jersey.

Questions asked were:
• Please introduce yourself by your name and position here.
• What is the overall philosophy of Dassault Falcon Jet? What’s their purpose?
• How did you discover that you were interested in aviation?
• What has been your hardest parts and your triumphs as a female pilot?
• What tips do you have for females wanting to go into this expanding field?
• What do you hope the aviation industry accomplishes in the next decade?

Special thanks to NYSCI Trustee Al Bunshaft, and to John and Pauline at Dassault Falcon.
To learn more about Dassault Falcon, visit https://www.dassaultfalcon.com/en/Pages/Home.aspx

Producer: Mariel
Cam B: Kevin Cunningham
Editor: Emily
Co-Editor: Kevin Cunningham
Audio: Emily
Director: Mizanur Rahman

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Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design-Make-Play. The defining characteristics of Design-Make-Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

High school and college students are invited to STEM Night to explore how design and engineering converge in our ever-changing world today. Explore the various educational and career opportunities there are in these fields!

Held in our Design Lab, students will engage in hands-on activities, hear from guest speakers who are experts in the field, and network with STEM professionals and organizations.


Featuring design and engineering professionals and organizations:
The New School
BlueStamp Engineering
Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers
LIU Brooklyn
MakerState
School of Engineering and Computer Sciences- New York Institute of Technology
New York University Tisch School of the Arts Interactive Telecommunications Program (ITP)
Ran Tian
José Vega-Cebrián (Sejo)
Yueping Wang

 

Get Involved
STEM professionals interested in sharing their experiences with students and joining this event, or educators with student groups who want to attend this event, please contact acanova@nysci.org for more information.

 

The STEM Night series is a program of NYSCI’s Alan J. Friedman Center for the Development of Young Scientists.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design-Make-Play. The defining characteristics of Design-Make-Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Parent's role in STEM education

Like countless immigrants before her, Angelica Salgado came to the United States to provide a better life for her family. Like many newcomers in the Corona section of Queens, Angelica works hard to give her three children the best education New York schools have to offer. She trusts that the school system and teachers “will do right” by them.

Indeed, the schools have improved. But perhaps not enough to merit her trust.

In 2016, the district’s English Language Arts scores for 3–8th graders increased by seven percentage points as compared to the previous year. However, English language learners, like Angelica’s children and those of the two-thirds of Corona families born outside the U.S., did not fare as well: their scores decreased by one percentage point.

The situation is even worse for non-native students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) courses. Careers in those areas are where the jobs are, now and in the future, but many parents who are ambitious for their children hesitate to get involved in advocacy for them or in planning their courses and extra-curricular activity. To immigrant families, the overall school-to-work pipeline may be downright mysterious.

So what’s a parent to do? As president and CEO of the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI), I take this question very seriously.

(Andrew Kelly/ NY Hall of Science)

Our educators and researchers know that few formal and coordinated efforts exist to connect students to STEM opportunities and careers. Yet studies indicate that family engagement in children’s education yields positive results — children stay in school longer, they perform better and have better school experiences. This is consistent across grade levels, for in- and out-of-school contexts and among African American and Latino families.

So we’ve identified five types of programs and resources that parents need:

1. Resources to help parents understand and navigate the school system. The New York City Department of Education created parent coordinator positions in 2003. Parent coordinators have traditionally answered phones and helped with translation, but as Mrs. Salgado noted, “Some schools have more engaging parent coordinators than others.” Chancellor Carmen Fariña has moved to increase training for parent coordinators to be more proactive, such as organizing parents to take field trips and explaining ways they can help their children’s education. More could be done to strengthen these connections.

2. Access to STEM academic coursework and real pathways to STEM-related careers. Some schools host career nights and other work-focused events. Informal institutions such as museums and libraries could offer more programs. At NYSCI, we host free STEM Nights where kids can watch presentations from STEM professionals and chat with them afterward in a relaxed setting. Free resources such as the New York Urban League’s A Parent’s Guide to STEM can provide further insight.

3. Programs that emphasize a two-generation approach that includes both children and parents. Some activities that are becoming popular educate the parents while educating the child. The Home Instruction for Parents of Preschool Youngsters (HIPPY) is a nonprofit program that shows parents their critical role as their children’s first teacher. HIPPY uses home visitors to role-play educational games with parents they can then play with their children. NYSCI runs a similar Little Makers program that invites families with young children to tinker, design and create projects together, from glider airplanes to sidewalk chalk art to superhero gadgets.

4. Activities across multiple settings that foster student success as a shared community responsibility. Our NYSCI Neighbors program works with 700 local families and schools to provide discounted entry to museums and invitations to STEM activities. The NYSCI auditorium is used for PTA meetings, and every year before our annual Maker Faire we invite area families to a pre-Faire community event.

5. Platforms that give parents a voice to ensure that their concerns and stories are recognized. School listservs, Facebook groups, parenting blogs and similar resources let parents seek guidance from teachers, school administrators and other experts, and to support other parents struggling with similar issues.

We still need to offer parents more. A new program called Parent University will be a component of our Queens 20/20 initiative that makes it easier for parents to find and use available resources. Then parents like Angelica Salgado will be better able to prepare their children for college work in STEM subjects and possibly careers in a STEM field.

Only if all of us — schools, museums, and community organizations — make it easier for parents to find the resources they need will we be able finally to “do right” by Angelica Salgado and her children.

Margaret Honey is the president and CEO of the New York Hall of Science in Queens, New York. Her essay is part of a series on parent engagement produced by the philanthropic foundation Carnegie Corporation of New York.

Para la versión en español, haga clic aquí.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design-Make-Play. The defining characteristics of Design-Make-Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Journey to Space is a celebration of space exploration, a tribute to international cooperation in space research, and a vision towards our near-term future beyond Earth’s orbit — a manned mission to Mars within a generation. Learn about the important role of the International Space Station, uncover what NASA and the space community are working on, and the challenges they face to carry out bold missions such as capturing asteroids and landing astronauts on Mars. Narrated by Sir Patrick Stewart. 20 minutes.

$6 adults, $5 children, students, and seniors, plus NYSCI admission.
(Members: $4 per person; free for Family Explorer members.)

Schedule:
July 1, 2016 – June 30, 2017
Weekdays – 12 pm
Weekends & Holidays – 1 pm & 4 pm

*Please be advised, purchase of museum admission is required in order to visit our 3D theater.

Buy Tickets

 

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design-Make-Play. The defining characteristics of Design-Make-Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Join us for a free evening of fun as you explore the range of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) opportunities that are available to you. Hear from professionals connecting with STEM in unexpected ways and learn more about the interesting work they are doing. Explore the programs that support your growing interest in STEM fields and engage in hands-on activities.

Designed for high school and college students, the STEM Career Expo highlights organizations, colleges, universities, professionals and companies involved in science, technology, engineering and math. More than 30 STEM-related organizations are expected to participate in the event, offering valuable insight and advice to students who attend. We are also partnering with one of our favorite local restaurants to give you a taste of Corona, Queens and keep you energized for the evening!

*Chaperones are required for students under age 16. Please bring your student or teacher ID.

 

At the STEM Career Expo, you can:

  • Use flight simulators with STEMPilot.
  • Send video postcards.
  • Take your photo at our green screen photobooth.
  • Find out about internship opportunities.
  • Tech Hacktivities
  • Learn about software development and programming JavaScript.
  • Discover STEM summer enrichment camps.
  • Find out about career opportunities in geoscience and learn about environmental science and geology degrees.
  • Get tips for creating a great resume, pitching yourself with an elevator speech, and networking with STEM professionals.

 

Get Involved:

STEM professionals interested in sharing their experiences with students and joining this event, or educators with student groups who want to attend this event, please contact acanova@nysci.org for more information.

 

Partner Organizations:

Adaptive Design Association
Big Show CM
The Browning School
Civil Air Patrol
CodeSpeak Labs
Columbia Space Initiative
Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health
CUNY Queens College
Digital Girl, Inc
EverFi
Explainer TV
The Graduate Center, CUNY
Green Mountain Energy
MakerState
Mercy College
MindRider NYU
Museum of the Moving Image
New York University
NYCSPARX Technology Program for Girls
Physics Department of Queens College
Queens College School of Earth & Environmental Sciences
Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers
STEM Kids NYC
STEMPilot
Tech Kids Unlimited
Upperline School of Code
Vidcode
Wildlife Conservation Society
Zoomdojo

 

The STEM Career Expo is a program of NYSCI’s Alan J. Friedman Center for the Development of Young Scientists. NYSCI’s STEM Career Expo is made possible with support from the New York Life Foundation, The Neuberger Berman Foundation and Con Edison.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design-Make-Play. The defining characteristics of Design-Make-Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Join us at this special evening event, STEM Night: The Future of Energy, to learn about the wide range of career opportunities available in energy, engineering and environmental science fields. At this free event, you can engage in hands-on activities, hear from experts in the field through a panel discussion, and network with STEM professionals. Light refreshments will be provided.

Panelists include:
Marie-Nicole Trimboli is a New York State licensed professional engineer and a graduate of The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art, where she received a Bachelor of Engineering degree specializing in mechanical Engineering. She is currently a senior planning analyst in Con Edison’s Steam Operations Planning group, responsible for natural gas planning, analysis for the steam generating stations, and technical projects. Before joining Con Edison, Marie worked at WSP Flack + Kurtz as a consulting engineer, designing HVAC systems for various projects.

Greg Hastings is an engineer at Consolidated Edison where he manages large-scale construction projects. In his time at Con Edison, Greg has overseen many construction projects including conversions of power plants from oil to natural gas, upgrades to reduce power plant emissions, extensive work on Con Edison’s transmission lines on the Queensboro Bridge, and multiple storm hardening upgrade projects resulting from Hurricane Sandy. Greg received a Bachelor of Civil Engineering from the University of Delaware and is currently pursuing his Master of Business Administration at New York University. He is also a graduate of Con Edison’s Growth Opportunities in Leadership Development (GOLD)Program and holds an Engineer in Training (EIT) certificate.

Alex de Sherbinin is the associate director for science applications at the Center for International Earth Science Information Network(CIESIN), an environmental data and analysis center within The Earth Institute at Columbia University, specializing in the human aspects of global environmental change. Dr. de Sherbinin is a geographer whose research interests focus on the human aspects of environmental change at local, national and global scales.
He holds a doctorate in geo-information science and earth observation from ITC at the University of Twente (Netherlands), and master’s and bachelor’s degrees in geography from Syracuse University and Dartmouth College, respectively. Prior to joining CIESIN, he served as a USAID Population-Environment Fellow with the Social Policy Program of International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN, Gland, Switzerland), and a population geographer at the Population Reference Bureau (PRB, Washington, DC). From 1984-1986 he served as an agricultural extension agent with the U.S. Peace Corpsin Mauritania, West Africa.

The following organizations will host informational tables at the event:
Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers
Vidcode
Solar One
SunWorks
Re-Nuble
NYC Citywide Administrative Services- Energy Management

This event is geared towards high school and college students who are curious about careers in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). Chaperones are required for students under age 16. Please bring your student or teacher ID. Free with RSVP.

RSVP required.

RSVP Now

 

Get Involved: STEM professionals interested in sharing their experiences with students and joining this event, or educators with student groups who want to attend this event, please contact acanova@nysci.org for more information.

 

The STEM Night series is a program of NYSCI’s Alan J. Friedman Center for the Development of Young Scientists.

STEM Night: The Future of Energy is presented by Con Edison.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design-Make-Play. The defining characteristics of Design-Make-Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Visit Little Makers at the Mamas Expo 2016, held at NYSCI, where we will be offering our popular Cornstarch Packing Builders activity from 10:30 am – 12:30 pm on Sunday, March 13.

You can practice your engineering skills as you squish, mush and build with cornstarch packing peanuts, cardboard and your imagination. Recommended for ages 18 months and older. Free with NYSCI admission. This activity will take place in Maker Space.

 
Buy Admission

 
Sometimes creativity can get messy, so dress your little maker (and yourself) in old clothing that can be splattered with things like paint, ink and oobleck.

 

This program is supported in part by funding from the New York Community Bank Foundation, the Liu Foundation and the Lily Auchincloss Foundation. Maker Space is made possible thanks to an investment by Cognizant through its Making the Future education initiative.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design-Make-Play. The defining characteristics of Design-Make-Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Join us at this special evening event, STEM Night: Careers in Engineering, to learn about the wide range of career opportunities available in the engineering field. At this free event, you can engage in hands-on activities, hear from experts in the field through a panel discussion, and network with engineering professionals. Light refreshments will be provided.

The introductory remarks for the panel discussion will be given by Dr. Gilda Barabino, dean and inaugural Daniel and Frances Berg Professor at the Grove School of Engineering at the City College of New York. She is a highly sought-after investigator in the areas of sickle cell disease and tissue engineering with an extensive record of leadership and service in the chemical and biomedical engineering communities.

Panel speakers include:

Shakila Merchant is the deputy director of the CUNY CREST Institute. She is the education lead of the NOAA-CREST program and director of the High School Initiative in Remote Sensing of the Earth System (HIRES). She runs the eight-week summer outreach program for High School, CREST Undergraduate Research Experience (CURE), and Graduate Summer Program.

Skye Gruen is the director of new construction and sustainability at Bright Power. Her expertise includes energy modeling, construction oversight, LEED and ENERGY STAR consulting, energy auditing and integrated design. She meets regularly with design teams to help architects, engineers and developers work to build better buildings, focusing on energy and water efficiency, occupancy comfort, resiliency and operations and maintenance.

Aleksey Lukyanov-Cherny is a partner at SITU Studio. Born in Kiev, Ukraine, he moved to Brooklyn at age 10. Influenced by a family of architects, military pilots and fashion designers, he gravitated towards design, materials and technology. He attended Stuyvesant High School and earned his Bachelor of Architecture degree from Cooper Union School of Architecture in New York City. He has served as a guest critic at the Harvard Graduate School of Design and New York Institute of Technology, and lecturer on building technologies at the Cooper Union and Parsons School of Design.

Hamid James is the digital signage project engineer at Panasonic. He has a bachelor’s in electronic engineering and teaches networking and A+ courses at Lincoln Technical Institute. He works to develop new D.S. applications to expand D.S. offerings and next generation Panasonic products. Hamid has also worked with companies doing D.S. in large sport venue stadiums and video production settings.

Various organizations will host table top activities, including:

American Society of Civil Engineers
BlueStamp Engineering
CCNY-ASME
CCNY-NOAA Crest

Columbia Space Initiative
Engineers Without Borders
NYC DDC STEAM Initiatives
Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers
Society of Women Engineers
Theta Tau
Upperline Code

 

This event is geared towards high school and college students who are curious about careers in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). Chaperones are required for students under age 16. Please bring your student or teacher ID.

RSVP required.

RSVP Now

 

Get Involved: STEM professionals interested in sharing their experiences with students and joining this event, or educators with student groups who want to attend this event, please contact acanova@nysci.org for more information.

 

The STEM Night series is a program of NYSCI’s Alan J. Friedman Center for the Development of Young Scientists. NYSCI STEM Nights are made possible with support from the New York Life Foundation, The Neuberger Berman Foundation and Con Edison.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design-Make-Play. The defining characteristics of Design-Make-Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Learn how to harness the awesome elasticity of the humble rubber band to create a propeller powered car. Build your vehicle and iterate on the design to make your car faster, travel farther, or accomplish different challenges.

This workshop is recommended for ages 6 and older. $5 per adult/child pair, plus NYSCI admission. (Members: $3 per adult/child pair.)

Make It: Rubber Band Engineering will be held on:

    • Saturday, December 5 at 1:30 – 3 pm & 3:30 to 5 pm.
    • Saturday, December 12 at 1:30 – 3 pm & 3:30 to 5 pm.

Book Now

 

This workshop will take place in Maker Space. Maker Space is made possible thanks to an investment by Cognizant through its Making the Future education initiative.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design-Make-Play. The defining characteristics of Design-Make-Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Learn how to harness the awesome elasticity of the humble rubber band to create a propeller powered car. Build your vehicle and iterate on the design to make your car faster, travel farther, or accomplish different challenges.

This workshop is recommended for ages 6 and older. $5 per adult/child pair, plus NYSCI admission. (Members: $3 per adult/child pair.)

Make It: Rubber Band Engineering will be held on:

    • Saturday, December 5 at 1:30 – 3 pm & 3:30 to 5 pm.
    • Saturday, December 12 at 1:30 – 3 pm & 3:30 to 5 pm.

Book Now

 

This workshop will take place in Maker Space. Maker Space is made possible thanks to an investment by Cognizant through its Making the Future education initiative.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design-Make-Play. The defining characteristics of Design-Make-Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Share your views on the future of biological engineering! Participate in a variety of hands-on activities created by engineering biologists and discuss a range of potential applications of engineering biology. Activities are free with NYSCI admission and include:

Cell Spreading
Learn to use lab equipment and practice cell spreading techniques.
Microbe Match
Play this game to find out about possible microbes that exist or could be created with synthetic biology.
Building Immunity
Develop your own vaccine and learn how scientists engineer viruses to create vaccines.
Would You Eat That?
Examine new products that currently are or could be created with synthetic biology.
Smell the Biology
Explore smells produced by microbes. Learn how microbes produce different smells and why you might want to change the smell they produce.
3D Printing and Synthetic Biology
Using synthetic biology and 3D printing, what would you design to survive if you were one of the first colonists on Mars? Learn about current research and future possibilities of this technology.

This event is supported by the National Science Foundation under grant number DRL-1421179. Any opinions, findings, or conclusions expressed in this material are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.