Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Join us for STEM Night: Engineering to learn about the wide range of career opportunities available in the engineering field. At this free event, you can engage in hands-on activities, hear from experts in the field through career conversations, and network with STEM professionals. Light refreshments will be provided.

This event is geared towards middle school, high school and college students who are curious about careers in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM).

Chaperones are required for students under age 16. Please bring your student or teacher ID.

RSVP required. 

 

Here’s a look at last year’s STEM Night: Engineering:

STEM Night: Design & Engineering

 

Get Involved: STEM professionals interested in sharing their experiences with students and joining this event, or educators with student groups who want to attend this event, please contact acanova@nysci.org for more information.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Design and create a delicious mini gingerbread house. Recommended for children ages 18 months and older.

November 26 event has two sessions:
Session 1: 10:30am- 11:15am
Session 2: 11:30- 12:15pm

$9 per child, plus NYSCI admission. (Members: $8 per child.)

Sometimes creativity can get messy, so dress your little maker (and yourself) in old clothing that can be splattered with things like paint, ink, and oobleck.

This program is supported in part by funding from the New York Community Bank Foundation, the Liu Foundation and the Lily Auchincloss Foundation. Maker Space is made possible thanks to an investment by Cognizant through its Making the Future education initiative.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Design and create a delicious mini gingerbread house. Recommended for children ages 18 months and older.

November 26 event has two sessions:
Session 1: 10:30am- 11:15am
Session 2: 11:30- 12:15pm

$9 per child, plus NYSCI admission. (Members: $8 per child.)

Sometimes creativity can get messy, so dress your little maker (and yourself) in old clothing that can be splattered with things like paint, ink, and oobleck.

This program is supported in part by funding from the New York Community Bank Foundation, the Liu Foundation and the Lily Auchincloss Foundation. Maker Space is made possible thanks to an investment by Cognizant through its Making the Future education initiative.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

On November 19, 2017, NYSCI hosted the first of four clinics where staff from the Girl Scouts of Greater New York and supporting coaches/parents from specific troops, worked with a cohort of young Girl Scouts to further their preparation to address the challenges set forth by the FIRST LEGO League.

FIRST LEGO League teams research a real-world problem such as food safety, recycling, and energy, and are challenged to develop a solution. They also must design, build, program a robot using LEGO MINDSTORMS® technology, then compete on a table-top playing field.

Each challenge has three parts: the Robot Game, the Project, and the Core Values. Teams of up to ten children, with at least two adult coaches, participate in the Challenge by programming an autonomous robot to score points on a themed playing field (Robot Game), developing a solution to a problem they have identified (Project), all guided by the FIRST LEGO League Core Values. Teams may then attend an official tournament, hosted by FIRST LEGO League Partners.

For the opening session at NYSCI, the challenge was themed HYDRO DYNAMICS. The Girl Scout team had to learn all about water—how we find, transport, use, or dispose of it. As part of The Robot Game, Girl Scouts reviewed the interface of the EV3 (Lego Mindstorm’s programming brick) online software, programmed their EV3 to accomplish a series of these challenges involving water, and explored different types of sensors.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Whether stacking blocks to construct a model city, designing ways to preserve leaves found on the way to school, or lining up by height in the classroom, children demonstrate a clear readiness to engage in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) learning early in life. While early childhood educators are often excited about supporting STEM learning, they aren’t always aware of all the STEM opportunities that can be cultivated in the things they already do with young children inside and outside the classroom.

To address this, NYSCI and Bank Street College of Education are collaborating with teams of educators from P.S. 28 and P.S. 330 in Queens to pilot the “Active STEM Learning in the Early Childhood Classroom” professional development program. As we embark on this new partnership, here’s three things that we hope our school partners take away from this experience.

 

Recognizing STEM Learning in the Everyday

A major goal of this project is to provide early childhood educators with opportunities for noticing the STEM learning that is already happening in their classrooms. Anytime students are asking and answering their own questions, imagining solutions to problems, or exploring the properties of materials, there is a foundation for STEM learning. Throughout this project, NYSCI and Bank Street coaches will guide our school partners in observing their students and reflecting on these observations. Participants will use a newly developed observation tool that we hope will give them a new “lens” for looking at their students’ thinking. Through observation and reflection, we’ll start to identify moments when students are already engaging in STEM thinking in order to build off these successes to provide additional contexts for STEM learning.

 

New Ideas for Familiar Materials

Many people think STEM requires specialized tools or constant access to digital technology, but even the simplest materials can foster deep thinking. During the guided classroom observations, as well as a series of hands-on workshops at NYSCI, we’ll be exploring different uses for materials that are readily available in early childhood classrooms. Something as simple as paper can be used to construct a model house, create a glider, or make a shadow scene. By thinking about how we invite students to explore the properties of materials and consider how these properties can affect the way we use these materials, we’re able to find new life in materials we use every day.

 

Increased Collaboration at Multiple Levels

Not only is this project a collaboration between NYSCI, Bank Street, and our partner schools, we’re also hoping to increase collaboration across school teams. Each school team consists of two kindergarten teachers, two first grade teachers, and one science cluster teacher. In many early childhood settings, there is limited time and support for collaboration among classroom teachers and science specialists. Through this project, we hope to provide our partners with space and resources needed to create an increased culture of collaboration that lasts after the project has ended.

As the project continues throughout this academic year, we’ll use future posts to share what we’re learning from one another, including strategies and tools that we hope other educators can use to support the active STEM learning in their own early childhood classrooms.

Dorothy Bennett and Michaela Labriole.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

In this activity, you will gather and test how much light passes through the different types of leaves in your neighborhood by utilizing Google’s Science Journal app. Grades: 2nd and 3rd. Duration: 30 – 40 minutes.

 

Have You Ever Noticed Sunlight Passing Through Leaves?

As one of the few planets that can sustain life, Earth hosts a huge variety of life, most of which require light to grow and thrive. One of the best and most obvious examples of this is trees. Even among trees, there a great many varieties. If you take a look around your own neighborhood, you will likely notice many different types of trees with many different types of leaves.

Many people turn to trees for shade when it’s hot out because the leaves block the rays of the sun, but while we may benefit from this, leaves have a very important job to do for the survival of the tree: they must capture the light energy from the sun to power the process of photosynthesis. During photosynthesis, the light energy from the sun powers the chemical reaction to combine carbon dioxide in the air with water. This creates oxygen, which animals breathe, and starchy carbohydrates, which are the energy-packed building blocks of all trees.

Trees that grow in different climates develop different ways of using sunlight for photosynthesis. You can tell a lot about a tree just from the shape of its leaves and how much sunlight each leaf will let through.

 

What Trees Are in Your Neighborhood?

When you walk through your neighborhood, what trees do you see? (Adult supervision required. Classroom teachers can collect leaves for their students if desired.) Gather one leaf from at least three different trees that you see. Most of the time you can just grab a leaf that has fallen to the ground, but if the branches are low enough, make sure to pluck the leaf from the stem. One of the first things to notice is, whether the stem has multiple leaves attached or just one.

 

Identifying Your Green Neighbors

Once you’ve collected some leaves, it’s time to identify them. In the past, this used to be a slow and sometimes difficult process, but today there are lots of tools on the Internet that make it easy. Here is a brief list of some such tools:

If you’ve collected many leaves, it may be helpful to label them as you learn what they are. An easy way to do this is with masking tape and a pen.

Now that you know some of the species of trees in your neighborhood, you can read up about those trees to learn more, but it’s so much more fun to explore first-hand using the leaves you have.

 

Leaf Translucency

As we have learned, leaves block the sun’s rays, creating shade, but some sunlight passes through leaves. How much sunlight passes through depends on how many features the leaf has. Let’s take a look at the leaves that you have.

For this activity you will need the following materials:

  • A cell phone or tablet with the Google Science Journal app.
  • The leaves you have gathered.
  • A flat surface either outdoors or in daylight (a flashlight can be used if done indoors).

 
Make sure the Google Science Journal app (GSJ app) is measuring light or Lux which a measurement of how much light is reaching a given surface.

The light from any source looses intensity the farther away from that source it travels. To give you an idea of the amount of Lux you may experience daily, the full moon provides approximately 1 Lux of illumination while direct sunlight is approximately 30,000 Lux. Average daylight might be around 3,000 Lux (see image above). Your cell phone or device uses the Lux sensor to determine how bright to display the screen; the brighter the ambient light, the brighter the display. Determine where the Lux sensor is located on your cell phone or device. You can place the tip of your finger over various places along the edge of your phone; when you notice the Lux meter reading drop to zero you’ve found the location of the sensor (see image below).

 
1. Hit the record button located at the bottom of the Google Science Journal app to begin recording your first observation.

 
2. Place a leaf over the Lux sensor, being careful not to place your finger over the sensor.

 
3. Press stop on the recording (same button as record) and then press the edit pencil icon (see below) on the top right to name the trial. It’s best to name it after the tree the leaf belonged to.

 
4. Press the back arrow in the top left to return to your observation recording, then tap the eye icon to continue with your observations (see image below).

 
Repeat the process until you have seen how much light gets through each leaf or, in other words, the translucency of each leaf.

 

What Does Leaf Translucency Tell Me?

There are many things that affect the translucency of a leaf. In fact, the more features a leaf has, the less translucent it is likely to be. On one end of the spectrum are thin leaves that are very translucent. These tend to be leaves that grow in fair weather climates where the leaves have access to sunlight, moisture, and rich nutrient-dense soil. One example of this is a mint leaf. On the other end of the spectrum are dense leaves that are much less transparent. These leaves tend to grow in harsher climates that challenge growth in one way or another. One example is an aloe leaf. Aloe plants have fleshy leaves that hold water to sustain the plant during a drought. To help prevent water loss through to the leaves and to reflect excess light away from the plant, aloes have a waxy coating on the outside of the leaves.

So what features did you notice on the leaves you gathered? Did any of them have a fuzzy coating or a waxy coating which can help it to reduce water loss? Were the leaves large, allowing it to collect as much sunlight as possible, or small, narrow and compact, reducing its surface area to gather less sunlight and stay cooler?

Chances are that many of the leaves you have collected share many similarities since they are growing in the same climate. However, even in the same climate, there is variation in trees and different trees develop different adaptations for dealing with their surroundings. Often, the evidence of these adaptations is in the leaves.

 

More on Things That Grow in Your Neighborhood

We hope you have enjoyed exploring tree leaves in your neighborhood. In your adventures gathering leaves, you may have noticed a lot more than just trees growing. There are a great many plants that grow in whatever climate you may live in, even in cracks on the ground. If you expand your observations to include bugs, insects, and other wildlife, you will begin to see the network that exists around you that you may have overlooked before. Consider the fact that all these things need the light from the sun in some way or other. We encourage you to continue exploring your living environment and growing right along with it.


 

Making a Better Speaker activity is made possible with support from Making & Science, an initiative of Google.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

In this activity, you will explore the built-in accelerometers in a cell phone to sense changes in speed by utilizing Google’s Science Journal app. Grades: 8. Duration: 30 – 45 minutes.

 

What Factors Make a Car Faster or Slower?

The force generated from a car’s engine can propel the vehicle along any plane, but what about a toy car with no engine? What other factors affect its acceleration? A car (or any object) in motion, tends to stay in motion. But when that car is still, it has a tendency to stay still. This tendency to stay in its current state is called inertia and is Newton’s first law of motion: An object continues in its state of motion or rest unless acted upon by an unbalanced force.

Acceleration is what happens when the above “unbalanced force” is introduced. When you say a car is accelerating, that means its speed is changing. It can go faster, slower, or change direction. You can measure a car’s acceleration based on how many meters it moves per second squared (m/s2).

 

Can You Control a Toy Car’s Acceleration?

What can you do to control a toy car’s acceleration? For this exploration, let’s see how the surface of the plane the car travels on, and the angle of that plane, affect its acceleration. We’ll be able to see how far the toy car goes, but we can also directly measure its acceleration.

 

Measuring Acceleration

The Google Science Journal app uses the built-in accelerometers in a cell phone to sense changes in speed. This allows the phone to switch its display mode between portrait and landscape depending on how the phone is held.

Open the Google Science Journal app on your device. Your screen should look like this:

The blue area tells you which sensors data is being displayed, and lists all the sensors available to you including light, sound, X, Y and Z acceleration, and barometric pressure. If you do not see available sensors listed, just click on the arrow circled in red on the left (see image below). The active sensor currently displaying data will have a yellow line underneath it:

 

It’s interesting to note that when using the Google Science Journal app to measure acceleration on the Z axis, you will notice a persistent fluctuation even when the phone is completely still on a stationary surface.

 

This is due to the acceleration created by the gravitational force of the Earth which is approximately 9.8 m/s2.

In addition, you can graph your observations using an acceleration graph:
acceleration graph

 

Create Your Own Test Course

Gather the following materials:

 

  • 1 long strip of cardboard (at least 24 inches in length)
  • 1 toy car
  • Felt or carpet fabric (enough to cover one side of the cardboard)
  • Sandpaper (enough to cover one side of the cardboard)
  • Tape (enough to tape the sandpaper to the cardboard)
  • 2 paper binders (to clamp the felt to the cardboard)
  • 10 cups
  • 1 protractor
  • 1 cell phone (or tablet) with the Google Science Journal app installed

Tape sandpaper to one side of your cardboard strip. Try to cover as much surface area as possible. This will serve as one side of the ramp that the toy car will roll down.

 

Traditionally, vehicle acceleration is tested on drag strips. These are straight tracks usually a ¼ mile long. Using standard sized 81/2” x 11” copy paper, you’ll need to tape together at least eight pieces.

 

Place a distance marker every inch along your drag strip so that you can later measure how far the car travels under various conditions.

 

Rest one end of your cardboard on two cups and lay out your paper drag strip in front of the opposite end of your cardboard.

 

Your entire setup should look similar to the one in the picture below.

 

Next, measure the angle of the cardboard from the base, where it meets the drag strip. Make sure to write down all your observations. So far, this includes the number of cups used and the angle of the cardboard.

 

You’re almost ready to run your first trial, but first, you will need to attach your device to your toy car. How you do this will depend on your device as well as your car’s shape and size. See the image below for a sample.

 

Now it’s time to run your first trial. Press the “record” button located on the bottom of the Google Science Journal app interface (see image below). Point the car towards the drag strip and let it roll. When your car stops rolling, note how many inches it has rolled, stop the recording, and note the maximum acceleration.

 

If you prefer to see your acceleration results in graph form, just click on the graph icon.

You can also record in this graph mode:

 

Your notes should now include the type of surface used for this trial, the angle of the cardboard, number of cups used, and the maximum acceleration/distance traveled by the toy car. You’ll find the provided graph conveniently accommodates documenting these results.

Now that you have documented your first trial, you can change one variable and run a second trial. What are your variables? Which ones will you change? The variables that are directly under your control are:

  1. Type of surface (cardboard, sandpaper or felt) to increase or decrease friction.
  2. Number of cups used to increase or decrease the height or angle of the cardboard ramp.

Testing Tip:
For your second trial, as well as all following trials, it’s important to change only one variable and keep everything else you do the same. This way you can be sure that the results you observe later are only due to the changes you have made.

 

Make Predictions

Do you think the toy car will accelerate faster on the felt, cardboard or sandpaper surface? What about the angle of the cardboard? Does a greater angle = greater acceleration? Make a prediction before you continue to see if you are right. Continue running trials.

 

Results – What Happened?

Did you try all surfaces? Did you try at least two different angles? Under which conditions did the toy car travel the farthest? Which conditions lead to the most acceleration? You may have noticed that the different surfaces had different effects on the toy car’s acceleration. These different surfaces introduced varying amounts of force into the equation depending on the type of surface. The force created by these surfaces runs against the acceleration, thereby causing a decrease in acceleration. Were you able to determine which surface slowed the car down the most? Now that you know the results, do you think you can control how far/fast the toy car goes?

 

Ready for an Extra Challenge?

Challenge 1: You may find it easy to get the car to go very far, or even slow it down enough that it barely travels past the ramp, but can you control just how much it travels? Get the toy car to go 46 inches down the paper drag strip. (Anything above or below this amount does not count. Strategy and control are very important to accomplish this challenge.)

Challenge 2: Spoiler Alert! The highest angle (though under 90 degrees) you place the ramp in while using the smoothest surface will give you the greatest acceleration. But can you control the conditions enough to reach a target acceleration? Reach a peak acceleration of 18 m/s2 manipulating only ramp angle and surface type.

 

More on Motion

We hope you have enjoyed exploring Newton’s first law of motion through your acceleration experiments. If you are inspired to learn more, then you are in luck! Whether you want to continue exploring acceleration through making a bobsled or are interested in learning about the forces of flight through creating a human-powered flying machine, there are more hands-on activities for you to explore on our learnXdesign website.


 

0 – 60 mph: An Exploration of Acceleration activity is made possible with support from Making & Science, an initiative of Google.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Join us at this special evening event, Maker Night, to learn about the wide range of career opportunities available in the maker world. At this free event, you can engage in hands-on activities, hear from experts in the field through career conversations, and network with STEM professionals. Light refreshments will be provided.

This event is geared towards middle school, high school and college students who are curious about careers in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM).

Chaperones are required for students under age 16. Please bring your student or teacher ID.

RSVP required

 

Here’s a look at last year’s Makers Night:

STEM Night: Making for the Community

 

Get Involved: STEM professionals interested in sharing their experiences with students and joining this event, or educators with student groups who want to attend this event, please contact mbueno@nysci.org for more information.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Why Do Buildings Fall Down During Earthquakes?

How would a one or two-story building behave in an earthquake? How do the building’s materials used affect the stability of the structure? How does the way those materials are joined or connected influence the behavior of a falling structure?

From the perspective of an engineer, failures are important. Houses are built to stand up; it’s when they fall down that a problem presents itself. Each failure provides new information about how a house can fall down, about what works, and what doesn’t. In this activity, you will investigate how a house collapses and then build a structure to test various ways to use materials to withstand an earthquake.

Can You Design a Structure to Withstand an Earthquake?

The first step is to understand how and why a structure collapses during an earthquake. How might a house frame behave in an earthquake, and what is the best way to make it earthquake resistant?

Earthquakes are usually measured using a seismograph, but this activity is more concerned with how structures are affected by the shaking caused by an earthquake. You will use meters per second squared (m/s2) to determine the acceleration of the structure. Fortunately, Google’s Science Journal app makes this easy by utilizing the accelerometer built into many modern cell phone and tablet devices.

 

Set Up Your Own Earthquake Simulator

Gather the following materials:

  • 2 equally sized pieces of cardboard (These must be larger than the size of the structure you will build so that the structure can rest on it.)
  • 4 marbles
  • 2 large rubber bands
  • Device with the Science Journal app
  • Tape

Evenly place the rubber bands around the two pieces of cardboard. Squeeze the marbles in between the two pieces of cardboard as evenly distributed as possible. If you tug on one of the cardboard pieces, it should shake.

You now have your earthquake simulator! The structure you build will go directly on top to test its earthquake readiness.

Next, tape your device with the Science Journal app onto the top surface of your earthquake simulator. Make sure to leave plenty of room for the structure you will create. Your setup should look similar to the image below:


Make sure the Science Journal app is measuring acceleration in the appropriate direction and give it a test. You should be able to get at least 6 m/s2 (meters per second squared) worth of vibration from your simulator.

 

Time To Build Your Structure

There are many things you can use and many ways to complete this activity. The following lists include potential materials to get you started. Feel free to experiment with other materials.

Edible Materials

  • Graham crackers
  • Frosting or fluff
  • Plastic knives
  • Popsicle sticks
  • Tape
  • Sugar cubes
  • Cardboard or construction paper (to serve as a base for your structure)

Simple Materials

  • Cardboard (ideally uniform pieces)
  • Tape
  • Scissors or crafting blade
  • Popsicle sticks
  • Rubber bands
  • Cardstock/Construction paper

Some questions you need to answer before you begin construction are:

  • How many stories will your structure be? Why?
  • How will you connect and join the pieces?
  • What will the overall shape of the structure be?

Once you’ve answered these questions and made your design choices, it’s time to make your structure. This is your opportunity to let your creativity flow. Explore a variety of ways to use the materials you have chosen and see which proves most efficient.

Here are some ideas for joining two pieces of cardboard (or other materials) together:

Try using slots.

Slotted joints can be very effective depending on where your structure bears weight. Tip: When cutting slots, make sure they’re not bigger than the thickness of the material, otherwise your joint will be very loose and unstable.

Don’t be afraid to try different shapes.

You can also try using popsicle sticks as cross-cutting beams.




Of course, you can use tape or other materials you would like to experiment with to attach pieces.


In addition to the above ideas, there are plenty of resources online for different types of joints. Often, the type of joint you use will depend on the type of material you are using, but inspiration can come from imagining what is possible. Have a look at the following websites for possible ideas:
http://www.craftsmanspace.com/knowledge/woodworking-joints.html
http://cardboardchair.weebly.com/
https://www.theartofed.com/2016/06/24/6-amazing-things-tab/

Building Tip:
Be sure to secure your structure onto the top of the earthquake simulator so that it does not slide off when it is being shaken!

Your finished structure should be fastened to its cardboard base. The cardboard base, the structure and the device with the Science Journal app should be fastened to the earthquake simulator like so:

 

Make Predictions

Take a minute to predict what will happen to your building/structure. Do you think it will stay upright? How long do you think it will be able to withstand the earthquake? Can you predict what the weakest part of your structure is? To achieve a successful design, engineers imagine how a design might fail; their job is to identify (and prevent) each way the design could fail.

 

Shake the House!

Now imagine there is an earthquake and the ground beneath the house shakes. The average earthquake lasts between 10 – 30 seconds. Keep shaking your simulator for 30 seconds. Try to get the Science Journal app to a peak acceleration of 6 m/s2. What happens to the house?

 

Results—What Happened?

Evaluate the test results to determine why it may have failed. Now that you have seen how your design handled a simulated earthquake, there will be a whole new series of questions to answer. Was your guess about the weakest part of the structure correct? Did anything unexpected happen? How do you think the way you shook your structure comes into play – how would frequency, amplitude, and duration affect the results?

 

Redesign

Making your observations and forming new questions will give you ideas to make improvements and prevent the same weaknesses from causing another failure. You can use the same materials. However, if you think one of the materials used was part of the problem, consider trying other materials.

 

Real Earthquakes

For this activity, we are just simulating earthquakes. The truth is, real earthquakes can be much more complex. An earthquake is the shaking of the Earth caused by pieces of the Earth’s upper crust, or tectonic plates, suddenly shifting. This shifting of tectonic plates causes the ground to shake in many directions. When the shaking occurs, structures can potentially get thrown from side to side and/or up and down, but the structures have entropy; this means that a structure that is resting with no acceleration tries to remain at rest. The problem is, the tectonic plate that it’s resting on is moving. This is illustrated below:

Another factor that affects structures during an earthquake is what that structure is built on. The surface over the tectonic plate can be hard rock of soft soil. Before actual construction workers begin the process of making a building there are many things to consider. Will the materials be strong, rigid and well reinforced, or flexible, thereby able to absorb movement without deforming? Also, is the planned construction site near a fault or in a place that has a higher chance of earthquakes? Often, hazard maps like this one will be used:

The green, outer portions of the map are farthest away from the fault line located in the center of the map. Areas closing in on the center gradually change colors from yellow to red indicating an increasingly greater risk of experiencing earthquakes. (Hazard Map courtesy of Dr. Robert Herrmann, Saint Louis University)
As you try this activity, we encourage you to learn more about earthquakes. Have a look at the research being run by the Multidisciplinary Center for Earthquake Engineering Research (MCEER). But most of all, we encourage you to try out your own ideas. There is nothing like learning first hand what works and what doesn’t work.


 

Shake, Rattle and Roll – An Earthquake Simulation activity is made possible with support from Making & Science, an initiative of Google.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

In this activity, you will explore methods for visualizing sound and then create a device to amplify the sounds generated from a cell phone or tablet by utilizing Google’s Science Journal app.

Materials:
Clear drinking glasses

  • Water
  • Tuning forks
  • Balloons
  • Crisped rice cereal
  • Toilet paper rolls
  • Small Mylar sheets (the size of a small index card is sufficient)
  • Coffee Canisters
  • Laser pointers
  • Paper towels
  • Rubber bands
  • Tape

 

Investigation #1: Seeing Sound Waves
  1. Fill a drinking glass or clear container with water.
  2. Strike the side of the table gently with the tuning fork.
  3. Look at the tips of the tuning fork after you strike it. What do you see, hear or feel?
  4. Make the tuning fork vibrate.
  5. Once the tuning fork vibrates, place it gently in the water. What happens to the water? Are there different effects if the tuning fork comes close to the water but doesn’t touch the water?

What’s Happening?

Sounds are vibrations that move through matter. When a tuning fork is struck, you cannot see the sound waves move out from the tuning fork, but you can hear them. When the tuning fork vibrates, air molecules quickly bounce off the fork. The vibrations move through the air until they reach your ear, causing it to hear a sound. The vibration of air molecules is invisible to us. However, we can witness this vibration if it occurs in a denser medium such as water.

 

Investigation #2: Crisped Rice Cereal Dance
  1. Place half a teaspoon of crisped rice cereal in an empty balloon.
  2. Gently blow up the balloon and tie it securely.
  3. Strike your tuning fork to create vibrations and place the tuning fork on the balloon where the cereal is resting in the balloon (usually at the bottom). Predict what will happen and then compare your predictions with your observations.

What’s Happening?

The vibrations from the tuning fork cause the balloon to vibrate which causes the cereal to move around in the balloon.

 

Investigation #3: Seeing Sound Tube
  1. Gather a balloon, a small sheet of Mylar, a rubber band, the scissors and the laser.
  2. Cut the top of the balloon off, leaving the rounded part intact.
  3. Place the balloon firmly on the toilet paper tube so the balloon is stretched as far as it can go.
  4. Reinforce the balloon with the rubber band to keep it in place.
  5. Cut three or four 1/2-inch-squares of Mylar and tape them onto the balloon surface.
  6. Ask a partner to shine the laser onto the Mylar while the tube is aimed downward at an angle. The reflection of the laser should hit the table.
  7. Cup your hand over the tube and place your mouth on your cupped hand. Talk into the tube. What do you observe? What happens when you change the pitch of your voice?

What’s Happening?

The vibration from your voice travels into the tube and hits the inner surface of the balloon, which vibrates the balloon and the Mylar, creating different shapes in the projected laser image on the table. Changes in pitch will create changes in the laser image.

What can we say about sound based on our experiments?

When something moves quickly back and forth, it is vibrating. You hear a sound when a moving object makes the air vibrate. These vibrations are called sound waves and can travel through any substance, whether it is a solid (like metal), a liquid (like water), or a gas (like air), but the speed at which sound waves travel is different in each substance. Substances are made up of molecules. The more tightly “packed” the molecules are, such as in solid objects, the quicker the sound waves can travel. More loosely “packed” molecules (like air), cause the waves to move more slowly. Sound waves travel the fastest through solids, followed by water, and then air.

Vibrations also create different notes or pitches. High-pitched sounds, such as the sound of a whistle, create waves that are close together. Lower-pitched sounds, like thunder, create waves that are farther apart. The pitch of a sound is determined by its frequency. Frequency is the number of waves that pass a point in one second. The higher the frequency, the higher the pitch. The lower the frequency, the lower the pitch. The length of a vibrating object contributes to the pitch.

 

WHAT’S NEXT? TURN IT UP!

 

Make A Better Speaker Challenge

In this design engineering activity, you will amplify the sounds coming from a device of your choice by using simple, everyday materials.

First, gather recyclable materials. We suggest the following:

  • Portable music player or cell phone, or tablet
  • Headphones
  • Cups (plastic or foam)
  • Various types of paper
  • Canisters
  • Toilet paper rolls or paper towel rolls
  • Tape
  • Scissors
  • Plastic bottles
  • Bowls
  • Cardboard boxes
  • Cell phone or tablet with the Google Science Journal app

Create a speaker that will amplify the sound coming from your mobile device. You can use any of the materials in a way that you think will amplify the sound. Then use the Google Science Journal app to measure if your design increased the sound waves emitted from your device.

Step 1. Investigate the materials available to create your design. What are they made of and how can you arrange them so that they will amplify sound?

Step 2. Create an initial sketch of what you would like to make, label the parts, or describe your idea.

Step 3. Start making your speaker and attach it to your mobile device. This is your prototype!

Step 4. Turn the device on and use the Google Science Journal app to measure the decibel output of your design. Compare it to the decibel output of your phone without your prototype attached to it. Did it improve the sound?

Step 5. The best designs are always based on a previous design that failed in some way. Reiterate your design to try to make it even better.

Hints:

Sounds can be made louder or amplified in a number of ways. By providing more energy in making the sound, its loudness can be increased. This could be achieved by beating a drum with greater vigor, blowing harder on the recorder, or using more energy when shouting. Electricity can supply the extra energy needed to increase the volume of sound, for instance in a hi-fi amplifier. When a stylus rests in the grooves of a rotating vinyl record, it is made to vibrate with very small movements. These movements are turned into small electrical impulses and sent to the amplifier of the hi-fi system. Here the small electrical currents are made larger and sent to the loudspeaker system where they are converted into the much larger vibrations of the speaker cone. A microphone picks up the small vibrations from the voice in a similar way. The tiny movements inside the microphone of a coil of wire inside a strong magnet can be turned into small electrical impulses. These once more can be amplified by an electronic system and made to drive a loudspeaker.

Funneling sound waves into the ear can also increase the volume of sound we hear. The outer ear already provides a funneling effect but a hearing trumpet will improve this. Holding our hands behind our ears will also have an impressive effect on the volume of sound received.

Another way in which sounds can be amplified is seen on the acoustic guitar, violin, drum, xylophone and many other instruments. These types of instruments are basically hollow sound boxes made of rigid material and often with a hole in. The small sound made by the instrument enables the sound box to reverberate and thus to project the sound further away from the instrument.

While there are many ways to create a speaker using the materials listed above, the following is a step-by-step detail of one possible way to do so.

 

Figure 1: Gather the materials you’ve chosen to use. Pictured is a cell phone, 2 cups, a toilet paper roll, a ruler, a pen and a precision blade.

 

Figure 2: Measure and mark the center of the toilet paper roll.

 

Figure 3: Since the built-in speaker on the phone is on the bottom, it was necessary to trace the shape of the bottom of the phone to prepare for cutting.

 

Figure 4: Cut the traced shape out of your toilet paper roll cutting an extra 1/8 inch to create flaps at the ends as pictured below.

 

Figure 5: Trace the shape of the toilet paper roll onto the side of each cup to prepare for cutting.

 

Figure 6: Try to make the holes in both cups identical.

 

Figure 7: Fit either end of your toilet paper roll into the holes in the cups.

 

Figure 8: Arrange the phone so that it points upward and the top of the cups face the direction you want the sound to be the loudest.

 

See if you can come up with a different way to amplify the sounds from your device using simple materials.


 

Making a Better Speaker activity is made possible with support from Making & Science, an initiative of Google.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Young designers will explore the possibilities in planning, design, and construction. Learn about different materials needed to construct buildings, and use everyday materials to make the tallest and sturdiest tower.

Join us for hands-on science experiments and sensory-rich projects in workshops specially designed for children, ages 5–7, with autism spectrum disorder and their parents and siblings.

Science Scouts workshops include a small teacher-to-student ratio as students practice focusing/concentration, social cognition, collaboration/teamwork, listening/comprehension skills and more. Our educators are trained to work with kids with differences.

These free workshops provide opportunities to enjoy family time at the museum in a welcoming, safe and understanding environment, allow parents to network with one another, and help families discover the wonder of science learning together. Materials will include visual schedules, a communication booklet and more.

Sometimes creativity can get messy, so please dress your young scientist (and yourself) in old clothing that can be splattered.

 

To register and for more information, call 718-683-9366 or email dmeza@nysci.orgPreregistration is required.

 

This program is free for families and is made possible through generous support from the Jesse and Joan Kupferberg Foundation.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Narrated by Academy Award® winner Jeff Bridges, Dream Big: Engineering Our World will transform how you think about engineering. From the Great Wall of China and the world’s tallest buildings to underwater robots, solar cars and smart, sustainable cities, Dream Big celebrates the human ingenuity behind engineering marvels big and small, and shows how engineers push the limits of innovation in unexpected and amazing ways. With its inspiring stories of human grit and aspiration, and extraordinary visuals for the world’s largest screens, Dream Big reveals the compassion and creativity that drive engineers to create better lives for people and a more sustainable future for us all.

DREAM BIG is a MacGillivray Freeman film produced in partnership with American Society of Civil Engineers and presented by Bechtel Corporation.

Duration: 42 minutes

Schedule:
July 1 – June 30, 2018
Daily at 2 pm

Price:
$6 adults, $5 children, students, and seniors, plus NYSCI admission.
(Members: $4 per person; free for Family Explorer members.)

Reserved school groups: $4 per person, plus group admission.

 

*Please be advised, purchase of museum admission is required in order to visit our 3D theater.

Buy Tickets

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

The Art of Science 2014 showcases images of artistic merit created during the course of scientific research. The exhibition spurs debate among artists about the nature of art, opens scientists to new ways of “seeing” their own research, and serves as a window through which the general public can appreciate both art and science. These images were chosen from more than 250 submissions from undergraduates, graduate students, postdocs, staff and alumni representing more than 25 different departments at Princeton University. They span the fields of electrical engineering, ecology, evolution, chemistry and biology with images of termites, cockroaches, fruit flies and geological structures.

Featured Photo
Watermarks by Sara Sadri, postdoc, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Princeton University.

“Watermarks” is by Sara Sadri (postdoctoral researcher). Water can erode rock, carve through cliffs, and sculpt sand. Water moving back and forth on the Atlantic coast created this intricate pattern. As a hydrologist, I am fascinated by the natural phenomena of our beautiful planet. The way water in this picture found its way back to the ocean reminded me of a peacock’s tail spreading under the sun or a woman’s hair blowing in the wind.

Free with NYSCI admission.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Although 3D printed prosthetics have in the past been assembled by children as young as 9 years old, designing such functional mechanical devices has typically been the realm of experienced 3D designers – until now! Come and join us as we build 3D printed grabbers, whose files have been created by 5th graders remixing or “hacking” existing Raptor Hand files to create unique devices of their own.

Recommended for ages 10 and older.

Workshops will take place at 2 pm, 2:15 pm, 2:30 pm, 2:45 pm, 3 pm, 3:15 pm, 3:30 pm & 3:45 pm.

Space is limited. Advance purchase is recommended.

 

Engineering Week
Engineering Week kicks off with Engineering Day on Monday, February 20, with a day of activities and tables run by the American Society of Civil Engineers. Engineering Week continues throughout the week of February 20 – 24 to cover different engineering concepts – from 3D printing prosthetics to solving urban risks with geoseismic engineering – accompanied by activities and challenges to put those ideas into practice in NYSCI’s Design Lab.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

3D Printing – It’s no longer just about Yoda heads, key chains and iPhone cases any more.

Come and join Rich Lehrer, a pioneer in the use of authentic 3D printing initiatives to inspire and engage students, as he shows NYSCI visitors how kids can become involved in 3D printing projects that are helping to make the world a better place. Learn about creating 3D printed assistive devices, try out 3D printed prosthetics, and even build a simple but unique grabber created by “hacking” the files of a 3D printable “Raptor Hand”

 

Schedule

  • Try Out Demo Hands, (noon – 4 pm)
    3D printing allows for the creation of cheap and customizable devices for children with upper limb differences. Come and try out larger “demo versions” of these hands
  • Film Screenings, (noon – 4 pm)
    View a selection of short videos exploring Rich’s 3D printed assistive device projects and the overall 3D printed prosthetics movement.
  • Engineering 3D Printed Assistive Devices – Kids Creating Solutions to Authentic Problems, (1 pm)
    In this presentation, Rich Lehrer, a pioneer in the use authentic 3D printing education projects, will describe how this technology is revolutionizing STEM, empathy and design education. Rich will outline his use of 3D printed prosthetics projects to engage and inspire kids, share Brookwood School’s groundbreaking MS/Seniors Design Collaborations, and will provide concrete steps for turning students into engineers.
  • “Raptor Hacking” – Creating Unique “Grabber Devices” by Modifying the Files for 3D Printed Prosthetics, Workshops from (2 – 4:30 pm)
    *Registration Required
    $4/$2 members, ages 10+
    Register Now 

    Although 3D printed prosthetics have in the past been assembled by children as young as 9-years-old, designing such functional mechanical devices has typically been the realm of experienced 3D designers … until now. Join us as we build 3D Printed Grabbers, whose files have been created by 5th graders remixing or “hacking” existing Raptor Hand files to create unique devices of their own.

 

Bio
Rich Lehrer is the innovation coordinator at Brookwood School (Manchester-By-The-Sea, Massachusetts), a national faculty member for the Buck Institute for Education, a facilitator in project and design-based learning for the Principals’ Training Center, and the former education coordinator for the Enable Community Foundation. In 2013, Rich broke some interesting ground when he worked alongside 12 Brookwood students in a yearlong project to become one of the first school groups to build a functional 3D printed device for a child: in this case, Rich’s son, Max. He has since gone on to become a leader in the use of 3D printing to create authentic problem solving experiences for students.

 

Links

 

Thanks to the following:

  • Peter Graven and his students at Deer Creek Intermediate School in St. Francis, Wis. for their help printing and creating the 3D printed “empathy hands.”
  • Brookwood School in Manchester-By-The-Sea, Mass. for the use of their printers to create hands and “Grab-Tor” components.

 

Engineering Week
Engineering Week kicks off with Engineering Day on Monday, February 20, with a day of activities and tables run by the American Society of Civil Engineers. Engineering Week continues throughout the week of February 20 – 24 to cover different engineering concepts – from 3D printing prosthetics to solving urban risks with geoseismic engineering – accompanied by activities and challenges to put those ideas into practice in NYSCI’s Design Lab.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Narrated by Academy Award winner Jeff Bridges, Dream Big: Engineering Our World will transform how you think about engineering. From the Great Wall of China and the world’s tallest buildings, to underwater robots, solar cars and smart, sustainable cities, Dream Big celebrates the human ingenuity behind engineering marvels big and small, and shows how engineers push the limits of innovation in unexpected and amazing ways. With its inspiring stories of human grit and aspiration, and extraordinary visuals, Dream Big reveals the compassion and creativity that drive engineers to create better lives for people and a more sustainable future for us all. 42 minutes.

DREAM BIG is a MacGillivray Freeman film produced in partnership with American Society of Civil Engineers and presented by Bechtel Corporation.

$6 adults, $5 children, students and seniors, plus NYSCI admission.
(Members: $4 per person; free for Family Explorer members.)

Schedule:
Weekdays, 2 pm

Buy Tickets

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Learn about civil engineering through interactive games, construction challenges and hands-on activities presented by the Metropolitan Section of the American Society of Civil Engineers and NYSCI Explainers.

 
Activities include:

  • Gumdrop Dome: Build a dome using gumdrops and toothpicks. Test how much weight your dome can support.
  • Topple-A-Tug: Design your own boat made out of aluminum foil and see how many pennies it can hold without sinking.
  • Paper Bridge: Build a bridge using paper, wooden blocks and paper clips. See how much weight it can hold before it collapses.
  • Paper Tower: Design and build a tower at least 10 inches high using index cards and paper clips. See if your tower can withstand a weight placed on top. (Hint: You can fold the index cards into any shape you want to increase their strength.)
  • Truss Bridge: Using West Point Bridge Designer software, design the least expensive truss bridge that will pass a simulated load test.
  • Jenga: Build the tallest possible tower of blocks before the tower falls over.

 

Engineering Week
Engineering Week kicks off with Engineering Day on Monday, February 20, with a day of activities and tables run by the American Society of Civil Engineers. Engineering Week continues throughout the week of February 20 – 24 to cover different engineering concepts – from 3D printing prosthetics to solving urban risks with geoseismic engineering – accompanied by activities and challenges to put those ideas into practice in NYSCI’s Design Lab.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Engineering Week kicks off with Engineering Day on Monday, February 20, with a day of activities and tables run by the American Society of Civil Engineers. Engineering Week continues throughout the week to cover different engineering concepts—from 3D printing prosthetics to solving urban risks with geo-seismic engineering—accompanied by activities and challenges to put those ideas into practice in NYSCI’s Design Lab.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) integrate engineering into every grade level from kindergarten through 12th grade. Yet, at the elementary and middle school levels, in particular, most teachers do not have backgrounds or expertise in engineering. Even if they would love to teach it, many say they lack the resources and support to prepare students to be proficient in engineering and inspire them to pursue careers in engineering fields. To address these rapidly growing needs, Accelerate Learning™ and NYSCI have joined forces to develop a new solution called STEMscopes™ DIVE In Engineering.

“The best way to teach engineering isn’t from a textbook; it’s with hands-on, inquiry-based experiences,” said Dr. Vernon Johnson, president and CEO of Accelerate Learning. “For decades, NYSCI has been creating hands-on, energetic educational experiences where learners can indulge their curiosity and nurture their creativity. From the Design Lab to Maker Space Workshops to Design-Make-Play STEM Institutes, NYSCI has deep expertise in engineering and design, and in creating content and experiences that are engaging for students and teachers alike. We’re delighted to collaborate with a true thought leader in STEM to bring STEMscopes DIVE In Engineering to life.”

“There’s a great synergy between STEMscopes and the types of solutions NYSCI develops. However, one of the things that really drew us to Accelerate Learning was the company’s thoughtful approach to supporting teachers. They not only provide the curriculum and tools to meet teachers where they are now, they provide the embedded support teachers need to continuously improve how they teach STEM,” said Margaret Honey, president and CEO of NYSCI. “Our partnership with Accelerate Learning will result in an engineering curriculum that will be used in schools across the country, and get young students engaged in engineering and design and inventing the future.”

STEMscopes DIVE In Engineering will be part of Accelerate Learning’s award-winning STEMscopes PreK–12 product suite, which is built from the ground up to address the NGSS and today’s state standards. The online, comprehensive, hands-on engineering curriculum for grades 3–8 will be available for the 2017-2018 school year.

For more information, visit acceleratelearning.com or call toll-free 800-531-0864.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

An interview with NYSCI’s Inaugural Design Fellow, Deren Guler.

After finishing her degree in physics, Deren went on to become a fellow at NYSCI, where she has been developing the prototypes for her DIY electronic kits designed for young children.

As part of her fellowship, Deren facilitates workshops to deploy existing and new design and learning kits related to her Teknikio company but tailored to NYSCI’s current and developing audiences.

Through conversations with NYSCI’s Public Programming staff, Deren will craft workshops combining her skills and research with information regarding programming needs and audience specifics.

The Design Fellowship provides an opportunity for Guler to develop her new design and science-related kit content and rigor through public workshops and feedback/prototyping with NYSCI staff.

For more about Deren and Teknikio visit: http://www.teknikio.com/

MUSIC
“Allada” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

VIDEO
Produced by Bec Susan Gill and Jayde Lovell for ‘Did Someone Say Science?’

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