Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

As a core component of our Queens 20/20 initiative, NYSCI has launched a new program for families in our local community. During the school year, the Science Ambassadors program will admit thousands of students and their guardians to NYSCI for free in the after-school hours from Monday through Thursday. While at the museum, students can explore NYSCI exhibits, engage in engineering problems and learn new tools in workshops at Design Lab and Maker Space, listen to science stories, receive homework help, and learn from live science demonstrations.

In the program’s kick off Spirit Week, held February 27 – March 6, more than 900 families participated in bilingual museum tours and registered for the Science Ambassadors program. In collaboration with our school and community partners, families also enjoyed performances by school choirs and bands, folk dance groups and more during Spirit Week. Working in deep partnership with Community School District 24, and local school and community leaders, our goal over the next five years is to serve 5,000 families through the program.

Science Ambassadors is a program of NYSCI’s Queens 20/20 initiative and is supported by Science Sandbox, a Simons Foundation initiative dedicated to engaging everyone with the process of science.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Join us at this special evening event, STEM Night: Making for the Community, to learn about the wide range of career opportunities available in the maker world. At this free event, you can engage in hands-on activities, hear from experts in the field through a panel discussion, and network with STEM professionals. Light refreshments will be provided.

STEM Night: Making for the Community will feature STEM professionals and organizations including:

• UM Project
• Columbia Maker Space
• MakerState
• Museum of Interesting Things
• Upperline Code
• Make Mode
• STEM Advancement Inc.

 

This event is geared towards high school and college students who are curious about careers in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM).

Chaperones are required for students under age 16. Please bring your student or teacher ID.

RSVP required. 

 

Get Involved: STEM professionals interested in sharing their experiences with students and joining this event, or educators with student groups who want to attend this event, please contact acanova@nysci.org for more information.

 

The STEM Night series is a program of NYSCI’s Alan J. Friedman Center for the Development of Young Scientists. 
NYSCI STEM Nights are made possible with support from the New York Life Foundation, The Neuberger Berman Foundation and Con Edison.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Parent's role in STEM education

Like countless immigrants before her, Angelica Salgado came to the United States to provide a better life for her family. Like many newcomers in the Corona section of Queens, Angelica works hard to give her three children the best education New York schools have to offer. She trusts that the school system and teachers “will do right” by them.

Indeed, the schools have improved. But perhaps not enough to merit her trust.

In 2016, the district’s English Language Arts scores for 3–8th graders increased by seven percentage points as compared to the previous year. However, English language learners, like Angelica’s children and those of the two-thirds of Corona families born outside the U.S., did not fare as well: their scores decreased by one percentage point.

The situation is even worse for non-native students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) courses. Careers in those areas are where the jobs are, now and in the future, but many parents who are ambitious for their children hesitate to get involved in advocacy for them or in planning their courses and extra-curricular activity. To immigrant families, the overall school-to-work pipeline may be downright mysterious.

So what’s a parent to do? As president and CEO of the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI), I take this question very seriously.

(Andrew Kelly/ NY Hall of Science)

Our educators and researchers know that few formal and coordinated efforts exist to connect students to STEM opportunities and careers. Yet studies indicate that family engagement in children’s education yields positive results — children stay in school longer, they perform better and have better school experiences. This is consistent across grade levels, for in- and out-of-school contexts and among African American and Latino families.

So we’ve identified five types of programs and resources that parents need:

1. Resources to help parents understand and navigate the school system. The New York City Department of Education created parent coordinator positions in 2003. Parent coordinators have traditionally answered phones and helped with translation, but as Mrs. Salgado noted, “Some schools have more engaging parent coordinators than others.” Chancellor Carmen Fariña has moved to increase training for parent coordinators to be more proactive, such as organizing parents to take field trips and explaining ways they can help their children’s education. More could be done to strengthen these connections.

2. Access to STEM academic coursework and real pathways to STEM-related careers. Some schools host career nights and other work-focused events. Informal institutions such as museums and libraries could offer more programs. At NYSCI, we host free STEM Nights where kids can watch presentations from STEM professionals and chat with them afterward in a relaxed setting. Free resources such as the New York Urban League’s A Parent’s Guide to STEM can provide further insight.

3. Programs that emphasize a two-generation approach that includes both children and parents. Some activities that are becoming popular educate the parents while educating the child. The Home Instruction for Parents of Preschool Youngsters (HIPPY) is a nonprofit program that shows parents their critical role as their children’s first teacher. HIPPY uses home visitors to role-play educational games with parents they can then play with their children. NYSCI runs a similar Little Makers program that invites families with young children to tinker, design and create projects together, from glider airplanes to sidewalk chalk art to superhero gadgets.

4. Activities across multiple settings that foster student success as a shared community responsibility. Our NYSCI Neighbors program works with 700 local families and schools to provide discounted entry to museums and invitations to STEM activities. The NYSCI auditorium is used for PTA meetings, and every year before our annual Maker Faire we invite area families to a pre-Faire community event.

5. Platforms that give parents a voice to ensure that their concerns and stories are recognized. School listservs, Facebook groups, parenting blogs and similar resources let parents seek guidance from teachers, school administrators and other experts, and to support other parents struggling with similar issues.

We still need to offer parents more. A new program called Parent University will be a component of our Queens 20/20 initiative that makes it easier for parents to find and use available resources. Then parents like Angelica Salgado will be better able to prepare their children for college work in STEM subjects and possibly careers in a STEM field.

Only if all of us — schools, museums, and community organizations — make it easier for parents to find the resources they need will we be able finally to “do right” by Angelica Salgado and her children.

Margaret Honey is the president and CEO of the New York Hall of Science in Queens, New York. Her essay is part of a series on parent engagement produced by the philanthropic foundation Carnegie Corporation of New York.

Para la versión en español, haga clic aquí.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

NYSCI has launched a new initiative to create a partnership between the museum and the communities it serves most directly with the creation of Queens 2020. Co-designed with educators, parents and school administrators from the communities neighboring NYSCI, Queens 2020 aims to create an ecosystem for improving STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) teaching and learning by developing new programs and engagement strategies to address unmet needs voiced by community stakeholders.

Queens 2020 will engage children and families in creative STEM learning, develop resources for teachers and students, build out-of-school STEM opportunities, and support STEM learning for high school and college students,” said Margaret Honey, president and CEO of NYSCI. “The program also aims to increase participation among Queens students in STEM focused high schools and AP courses, as well as broadening participation in programs created by NYSCI’s Alan J. Friedman Center for the Development of Young Scientists.”

NYSCI announced Queens 2020 during a meeting of the STEM Ecosystems Initiative in Washington D.C. led by the STEM Funders Network, which earlier this year announced more than $20 million in funding to 27 inaugural communities, including the Queens 2020 network. The STEM Ecosystems Initiative has a goal of reaching 600,000 teachers and students in its first three years. The convening brought together a growing community of practice of local leaders who are expanding STEM opportunities in their communities. The education, business and community leaders who participated also met with White House officials to discuss equitable STEM education and federal STEM policy.

Queens2020Panel

In the initial phase of Queens 2020, NYSCI is engaging in conversations to determine the community’s most urgent priorities for STEM education services. Gathering perspectives from educators, school administrators, parents, community leaders and other stakeholders, Queens 2020 will engender broad-scale, cross-sector collaborations to nurture and scale effective STEM learning opportunities for young people. In early 2016, NYSCI will form an advisory board and host a series of activity and feedback sessions that will determine the blueprint for projects to be undertaken in subsequent years.

Queens 2020 will be led by Andrés Henríquez, who has joined NYSCI as vice president of STEM learning in communities. He brings a broad expertise to this position, having worked previously as a program officer at both the National Science Foundation and the Carnegie Corporation of New York where he launched a national program to develop the field of adolescent literacy and also was a key contributor to the National Research Council’s Framework for K–12 Science Education, and the funding of Achieve Inc. to develop the framework-aligned Next Generation Science Standards. Earlier in his career at the Center for Children and Technology (CCT), he was part of the community transformation in Union City, N.J., where he lead a partnership between Bell Atlantic and the Union City Schools, culminating in Union City receiving national recognition when President Clinton and Vice President Gore acknowledged the extraordinary accomplishments of the school district, which ultimately became the model for a five-year, $2 billion program to put computers in all U.S. classrooms.

“I’m excited to be joining NYSCI in this endeavor to implement high-quality and high-engagement STEM programs into this community that has such high aspirations for their children,” said Henríquez. “This collaborative effort will allow us to take the best of what we know about STEM education and the needs of the future workforce. It’ll be so gratifying to build on the work that I’ve done in research, policy and practice and my experience with foundations locally and around the country.”

Queens 2020 is made possible with the generous support of The Simons Foundation.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

NYSCI has received the 2015 National Medal for Museum and Library Service, the nation’s highest honor given to museums and libraries for service to the community.

NYSCI received the honor due to its many programs that impact the community, including NYSCI Neighbors, a multifaceted initiative that engages more than 16,000 local participants, and the Science Career Ladder, a program that employs high school and college students to engage visitors on the museum’s floor.

“STEM literacy is immensely important, from living effectively in an increasingly technological world to securing our nation’s future economic growth and competitiveness,” said Margaret Honey, NYSCI’s president and CEO. “At NYSCI, we offer a number of programs and experiences that inspire the youth in our local community to learn about STEM subjects and encourage them to pursue careers in these fields. Receiving the National Medal for our work is a great honor and a significant milestone in our journey to transform STEM learning.”

First Lady Michelle Obama will present the award to NYSCI’s President and CEO, Margaret Honey, at a ceremony at the White House on May 18.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

NYSCI has been shortlisted for the 2015 National Medal for Museum and Library Service, the nation’s highest honor given to museums and libraries for service to the community.

NYSCI is one of only 30 finalists from around the country selected by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) for the award, which recognizes institutions that make significant contributions to their local communities through programs that engage and inspire individuals and families.

“Engagement and learning is at the heart of everything that we do at NYSCI,” said Margaret Honey, NYSCI’s president and CEO. “All of our programs emphasize exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance and deep engagement. We’ve seen again and again that when youth become involved in activities that encompass these characteristics, they become passionate STEM learners. We’re honored that IMLS has recognized our commitment to transforming STEM learning in our local community and has shortlisted us for this prestigious award.”

NYSCI’s program, NYSCI Neighbors, forms a significant part of its community outreach efforts. Launched in 2011 with 120 local families, NYSCI Neighbors began as an enhanced membership program aimed at addressing summer learning loss among elementary schools students in NYSCI’s home neighborhood of Corona, Queens. In just three years, NYSCI Neighbors has become a year-round multifaceted initiative, engaging more than 700 families, a network of 16 local school partners, and 16,000 annual program participants who reside within a two-mile radius of the institution.

NYSCI is located in Flushing Meadows Corona Park in the borough of Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country. NYSCI’s neighboring communities include Corona, Flushing and East Elmhurst. In Corona, 60 percent of the population is foreign born and more than 80 percent speak a language other than English. In Flushing, nearly 70 percent of the population is foreign born, while in East Elmhurst, more than 50 percent are foreign born.

In addition to the NYSCI Neighbors program, NYSCI offers a number of exhibits and programs designed to deepen visitor engagement and inspire youth to pursue careers in STEM. These initiatives include Design Lab, a hands-on experience that encourages visitors to find solutions to basic engineering and design challenges, the Science Career Ladder, a program that employs high school and college students to engage visitors on the museum’s floor, professional development for teachers, and maker workshops that encourage children to tinker, design and create.

National Medal for Museum and Library Service winners will be announced this spring by IMLS. Individuals who have visited NYSCI are encouraged to share their story on the IMLS Facebook page.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

On Saturday, December 6, 18 homeless children will visit NYSCI as part of a collaboration with Queens College called the Big Buddy Program. The program pairs a Queens College student with a child who is homeless and currently living in a shelter. Each Saturday during the program, the children and their buddies participate in various activities throughout the city. At NYSCI, the kids at this Saturday’s program will join a workshop on molecules and polymers, learn what makes airplanes and rockets defy the laws of gravity in a science demonstration about flight, and discover giant tortoises, marine iguanas and blue-footed boobies at a 3D movie about the Galapagos archipelago. In previous visits, kids and their big buddies have played in the Science Playground and Rocket Park Mini Golf, watched the Cow’s Eye Dissection demonstration, and participated in workshops on color and microbes.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

We launched the NYSCI Archives almost two months ago with a look back at 1966 when the Hall of Science reopened as a permanent museum following the World’s Fair. Two weeks ago, we looked back even further to 1964 and the opening of the Fair, at which time the Hall was still a work in progress.

Today, we jump forward 20 years, to 1984 and the arrival of Alan J. Friedman as Director of the Hall of Science. These memories are difficult ones because we learned yesterday that Alan passed away following a battle with cancer. He is gone too soon. But he left us so much.

In fact, you can say Alan left us everything. Everything the Hall of Science has become would be nothing if not for Alan Friedman.

Hall of Science Names Pioneer as New Director

When Alan arrived in 1984, the Hall of Science had been hollowed: “There was an inch of water on the floor. All the exhibits had been given away. Even the light fixtures had been yanked out of the wall.”

The museum had been closed since 1981. $2.9 million was appropriated in the City capital budget for renovations to include construction of a 13,000 square-foot mezzanine, a 100-seat planetarium, and new lighting, heating and cooling systems. The Board pledged to raise additional private funds for new exhibits and programs. (News accounts differ on the amount of the private fundraising goal. We’ve seen it pegged anywhere from $3 to $8 million.)

In May of 1982, the Daily News observed that inside the Hall “an almost tangible tranquility prevails.” But outside, “paint peels from the Saturn V and Apollo hulls, and graffiti adorn the walls around the space park; chipped cement and scattered stones fill the moat beneath the hall. But a sign at the gate assures: ‘Closed for renovation. Will reopen in 1983.'”

The capital renovations were completed, but in August of 1983, Cultural Affairs Commissioner Bess Myerson declared the Hall a failure and cut City funding. Only, $40,000 of the $8 million private fundraising had been achieved, and Myerson said that the museum would never be successful as it was currently constituted. She also felt the Flushing Meadows location of the Hall was an obstacle too great to overcome. Queens Borough President, Donald Manes, countered that Myerson was suffering from “Manhattanitis.”

A deal was brokered. The Hall of Science received partial funding from the City. A new Board was constituted. And in the aftermath, Alan Friedman was hired as Director.

Never again would the viability of the Hall of Science be called into question. Perhaps Alan’s greatest contribution to the Hall was giving it its permanence. The World’s Fair relic that had been shuttered three times before; the rockets with their peeling paint and graffiti tags; the museum that had given away its exhibits and had no proper entrance.

In the year before he arrived, the Hall of Science had an attendance of zero. In 2006, the year Alan retired, the Hall of Science had 447,000 visitors. In 1984, the Hall had five staff members.  In 2006, there were more than 90 full-time employees and more than 150 high school and college students employed as Explainers in the Science Career Ladder–a program created in 1986 under Alan’s leadership. The museum galleries that in 1984 displayed nothing other than standing water and feral cats boasted more than 450 hands-on exhibits in 2006.

In 1996, a $13 million expansion gave the Hall a new entrance rotunda, driveway, cafe, gift shop and theater. A year later, the 30,000 square-foot Science Playground opened, inspired by outdoor science parks Alan had discovered on a trip to India. In 2001, the rockets were dismantled, shipped to Ohio for restoration, and returned to the new Rocket Park in 2004. Later that year, the $92 million North Wing opened.

These were the major milestones. The minor ones were no less important to shaping the Hall of Science.

His approach was as simple as it was revolutionary. ‘‘Normally museums get together the best experts they can,” he said, ”have them design the exhibits, build them, put them out – and pray they work.”  But Alan’s approach to curating exhibits was a bit more iterative. “If they don’t get the message across, we’ll change them.”

Alan retired in 2006 and became an advisor and consultant to museums and universities worldwide. He ultimately had a 40-year career. He mentored hundreds of museum professionals, many of whom have written to share their memories of Alan. We know how important he was to the Hall of Science, but there’s also ample evidence of his impact and influence elsewhere. He helped us make sense of international student assessments.  He rallied his fellow museum directors to stand with one of their besieged colleagues. Just last month, he looked at what is happening to Detroit’s art museums and wondered “what exactly were the cost-benefit ratios of Newton’s laws, or of the Parthenon?”

We can write more. And we will.  There is much more of Alan Friedman to be discovered in the NYSCI Archives. For now, we miss him. He is gone too soon. But he left us so much.

UPDATE May 7: The New York Times ran Alan’s obituary today. Read it here.

Read all the posts in the NYSCI Archive.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Updated May 4, 2014 –

Earlier this week, we learned that Alan Friedman had fallen seriously ill. This morning, we received word that Alan has passed away. We are devastated at the loss. Our thoughts and prayers are with his wife, Mickey.

Alan was Director of NYSCI from 1984-2006. After retiring from NYSCI, Alan became a consultant to museums worldwide. He will always be one of the most respected and loved people in our community.

We created this page as a way for friends and colleagues to share their thoughts and remembrances. We love you, Alan.

You can read more about Alan’s legacy at NYSCI here.

UPDATE May 7: The New York Times ran Alan’s obituary today. Read it here.

Download our special booklet, Thinking of Alan Friedman, which includes transcripts of the tributes shared at the NYSCI Memorial on June 14, 2014, as well as memories and comments submitted to our website.

friedman004

 

 


Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Citizen Science uses crowdsourcing to create a platform for exchange and accessibility to scientific research. Join us for an introduction to a range of projects that involve the public in their research and quests, as well as a series of walk-up stations to learn useful observation and documentation skills and technologies. Walk away with a wealth of useful skills for the field and ideas for how you want to engage in public science projects.

Activities include:

DiY Scientific Sketchbooks – Work with NYSCI Explainers to make science sketchbooks from recycled DVD cases and learn tips for doing observation-based drawings. $3 per project (Members: $2 per project.)
Citizen Science Hacks – Work with Maker Space to build a tripod for your smartphone with office supplies you can find around the house. Learn how to repurpose your phone as a video microscope. Free with NYSCI admission.
Phone Photography Made Smart – Work with professional photographer Jackie Neale Chadwick to frame, light and stabilize your phone photos without equipment. Free with NYSCI admission.
Audio/Video for the Field –  Join NYSCI’s Explainer TV staff to learn how to get the best audio and video results from your phone or other accessible and inexpensive devices. Free with NYSCI admission.
Citizen Science Videos – Watch a series of videos to learn about the different projects you can join and approaches to citizen science. Free with NYSCI admission.