Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design-Make-Play. The defining characteristics of Design-Make-Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Celebrate Earth Day at NYSCI! Reuse, recycle and rethink how to respond to climate change. Take part in hands-on activities, learn how personal choices impact the climate, and come up with solutions and strategies to combat climate change.

 

Rethink and respond to climate change with these hands-on activities in Design Lab.

  • Emergency Structures – Climate change is leading to more frequent extreme weather events. Engineer a structure using dowels and rubber bands that can fit you and your family and can keep you safe through a storm.
  • Tote Bag Screen Printing – Customize your own tote bag by adding your own screen-printed design and learn about ways to reduce your waste.
  • Urban Planning in Empty Spaces with CUSP – Climate change is expected to bring hotter summers and more severe rainfall events to New York City. Act as an urban planner to redesign a vacant lot while considering different solution strategies.
  • Recycled Animation – Tell a story about the environment by directing your own stop motion sequence.

The Climate & Urban Systems Partnership (CUSP) is a group of organizations and individuals dedicated to climate change education through local and relevant solutions.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design-Make-Play. The defining characteristics of Design-Make-Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Event Description:
6:30 pm: Wine Reception
7 – 8:30 pm: Moderated Discussion and Q&A
 
Why has this topic been so difficult to address? What are the current priorities for communicating about climate change? What can we expect from the current administration on climate policy and research? What can we all be doing to support efforts to make the kind of change we want?
 
On the eve of Earth Day, join the NYSCI in Manhattan, and meet three pairs of artists and scientists who have created new artworks about current climate change research. These works, currently on view at ARTech (a free, pop-up activity center for children hosted by Meatpacking Business Improvement District, through April 29) present the perfect inspiration and platform for diving into an honest and timely conversation about the imperative and challenges of communication about climate change. Led by Reply All’s senior reporter, Sruthi Pinnamaneni, this conversation will cover many climate change angles.
 
Limited capacity. Ages 21 and older.
 
This event will be held in lower Manhattan. Those who R.S.V.P. will receive an email with the exact address.

 

About ARTech
NYSCI commissioned three artworks during 2016 as part of the ACCESS project, an annual exhibition series that fosters collaborations between visual artists and scientists in order to make themes from NYSCI exhibits accessible in new ways, for multiple publics. ACCESS 2016 focused on the ideas explored in NYSCI’s newest exhibition, Connected Worlds: ecology, connected systems, sustainability and climate change. Each artist was paired with a scientist to bring a unique, collaborative view of scientific research, making the research more accessible and inviting to museum-goers. Artists and scientists worked together over a six-month period, with resulting works taking the form of a 3D animation, an immersive video installation, and an interactive installation/performance, presented at NYSCI: November 19, 2016 – January 29, 2017, and at ARTech: March 1 – April 28, 2017.

ARTech is a partnership between NYSCI the Meatpacking Business Improvement District (BID) and the Children’s Museum of the Arts. The Meatpacking BID has generously offered to support this event.

 

About the Panelists
Moderator:
Sruthi Pinnamaneni is a producer and reporter at Gimlet Media’s Reply All. She graduated from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism with honors, while assisting at the BBC-NY Bureau and a documentary production company, where she worked on the award-winning feature film, Kumare. As the audio/video correspondent at The Economist, Sruthi worked on political stories and traveled between cities and villages in India to produce an Economist video series on rural education and the informal economy in slums. Sruthi has worked on radio stories that have aired at various shows, including Reply All, Love + Radio, Studio 360, Radiolab, Marketplace, Freakonomics, Transistor, and The Splendid Table. She won the 2013 PRX STEM grant, supported by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, and the Science Media Award for best radio story in 2014.

 

Artist/Scientist Pair #1:
Coche Gonzalez is a freelance TD/Compositor who has collaborated with various studios in the production of museum exhibitions, commercial animations and film effects. He has also taught at Pratt Institute, Columbia University and the Parsons School of Design, and he cofounded the New York City design studio SOFTlab.

Jack Tseng is a paleontologist with interests in both field-based and laboratory-based research on the fossil record of carnivorous mammals. He has led or participated in dozens of fossil digs in California, Utah, Wyoming, Mexico, Taiwan, Inner Mongolia and Tibet.

 

Artist/Scientist Pair #2:
Laura Chipley is a Queens-based artist who uses video, site-specific interventions and emerging technologies to explore potentials for human collaboration and to document the social and environmental impacts of energy extraction.

Hannah Zanowski has her Ph.D. in physical oceanography in the Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences Program at Princeton University. Her research explores the impacts of Antarctic open-ocean polynyas (vast regions of open water in the sea ice) on abyssal ocean properties and circulation.

 

Artist/Scientist Pair #3:
Carrie Dashow is a New York City-based artist working at the intersection of video, performance and visual arts. Her often-participatory work examines the undercurrents of authority, subjectivity and an indebted relationship to location.

S. Matthew Liao is a philosopher interested in a wide range of issues including ethics, epistemology, metaphysics, moral psychology and bioethics. He is director and associate professor of the Center for Bioethics, and affiliated professor in the department of philosophy at New York University.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design-Make-Play. The defining characteristics of Design-Make-Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Celebrate Earth Day at NYSCI! Reuse, recycle and rethink how to respond to climate change. Take part in hands-on activities, learn how personal choices impact the climate, and come up with solutions and strategies to combat climate change.
 
This event continues on April 22

 

Take part in fun, family friendly activities to learn more about climate change and find ways to respond.

  • Extreme Events – Explore the impact that green infrastructure has on managing water runoff in the face of extreme events.
  • Empty Spaces – Act as landscape architects to redesign a vacant lot while considering different solution strategies.
  • Hidden Cost Café – Explore the carbon footprints of your favorite foods.
  • Hot Spots – Explore differences in surface temperatures of locations across the city and discuss solutions to keep New York City cool.
  • Get to the Game – Explore the carbon footprint of their game-day food and transportation choices.
  • Choices in your Neighborhood – Identify which green energy choices are available in their neighborhood by stacking different colored legos on a map.
  • Digital Map – Upload stories, videos, data and pictures related to climate change impacts or programs in your neighborhood and see what your friends and neighbors are sharing.

The Climate & Urban Systems Partnership (CUSP) is a group of organizations and individuals dedicated to climate change education through local and relevant solutions.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design-Make-Play. The defining characteristics of Design-Make-Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Do you have a passion for helping the environment? Join us for STEM Night: Conservation and Energy to explore the wide range of opportunities in conservation, energy and environmental science.

Hear from guest speakers, engage in hands-on activities, and learn about different ways you can help save our planet.

 

STEM Professionals and Organizations (with more to be added):

  • Con Edison
  • Hunter College
  • The Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers
  • The Museum of Interesting Things
  • NYU Tandon School of Engineering
  • SUNY Maritime College
  • The Lowline
  •  

    RSVP required.

     

    Get Involved
    STEM professionals interested in sharing their experiences with students and joining this event, or educators with student groups who want to attend this event, please contact acanova@nysci.org for more information.

     

    The STEM Night series is a program of NYSCI’s Alan J. Friedman Center for the Development of Young Scientists. 

    Background

    Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

    NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design-Make-Play. The defining characteristics of Design-Make-Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

    NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

    About the Position

    Your help is needed to visualize climate change and research. Families are invited to participate in a project on climate science. Work with artist, Laura Chipley, and scientist, Hannah Zanowski, to learn about Hannah’s research and trip to Antarctica to study how Earth’s polar regions impact our global oceans. Participants will create and contribute drawings, sketches and collages to an animated piece, with the goal of making this important research more accessible. Work will be exhibited as part of the ACCESS: Artist and Scientist Collaborations exhibit (November 19 – December 31, 2016) at NYSCI. This workshop is for participants 6 years and older.

    noon – 12:45 pm; 1 – 1:45 pm; 2 – 2:45pm; 3 – 3:45pm

    No prior artistic experience is required. Free with NYSCI admission.

     

    Laura Chipley

    Laura Chipley is a Queens based artist who uses video, site-specific interventions and emerging technologies to explore potentials for human collaboration and to document the social and environmental impacts of energy extraction. Her recent projects include The Newtown Creek Armada, an interactive boat pond created in a New York Superfund site and The Appalachian Mountaintop Patrol, a collaborative, environmental watchdog and multimedia education initiative that works with West Virginia environmental activists to use documentary filmmaking, drones, environmental sensors and surveillance technology to chronicle the effects of mountaintop removal coal mining. Laura’s work has been exhibited internationally and her projects have been supported by organizations such as Art Matters, the Hudson River Foundation, the Brooklyn Arts Council and A Blade of Grass. Laura is an assistant professor of media and communications at SUNY Old Westbury College.

    Hannah Zanowski

    Hannah Zanowski is a graduate student in the Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences Program at Princeton University. She is pursuing a doctorate in physical oceanography and is currently in her final year of study. Her research explores the impacts of Antarctic open-ocean polynyas (vast regions of open water in the sea ice) on abyssal ocean properties and circulation. Hannah is more broadly interested in understanding the connections between the ice, atmosphere and ocean, and how changes that occur in Earth’s polar regions affect the global oceans. After receiving her doctorate, Hannah will continue her research at the University of Washington, where she recently accepted a postdoctoral fellowship from the Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean (JISAO).

    Background

    Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

    NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design-Make-Play. The defining characteristics of Design-Make-Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

    NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

    About the Position


    Weather is one of the most dynamic forces shaping our planet, but now it’s more extreme and complex than ever. Extreme Weather takes you where few have gone. Travel to the edge of 300-foot-tall glaciers collapsing, to the front lines of massive wildfires, directly in the path of deadly, yet mesmerizing, tornadoes. Follow researchers and everyday heroes as they uncover surprising connections to help us understand and adapt to our ever-changing weather.

    Duration: 40 minutes.

    Schedule:
    October 15, 2016 – June 30, 2017
    Weekdays – 11 am & 2 pm
    Weekends & Holidays – 12 pm & 3 pm

    *Please be advised, purchase of museum admission is required in order to visit our 3D theater.

    Buy tickets

     

    Background

    Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

    NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design-Make-Play. The defining characteristics of Design-Make-Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

    NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

    About the Position

    Collages and Photographs by Cristina Biaggi, Melissa Fleming, Isabella Jacob and Doris Shepherd Wiese
     
    Artists respond to the seasonal weather patterns of the natural world. Their creative sensitivity reflects the beauty, the drama, the grandeur and immensity of climate change in all its impact upon various geographic locations – ice formations from glaciers located at Kamchatka, Russia; Jokulsarlon Lagoon, Iceland; and Kenai Mountains, Alaska.

    This exhibition is inspired by the Climatic Visions exhibition at the Art Gallery, Rockefeller State Park Preserve, N.Y., and is curated by Audrey Leeds.

     

    Free with NYSCI admission.

     

     


    Above left: Isabella Jacob, Air.Ice.Rock #4, collage
    Above center: Doris Wiese, Glacial Ice Washed Up on the Black Sand Beach, Iceland, photograph
    Above right: Melissa Fleming, Exit Glacier, Alaska, photograph

    Top Featured Image: Cristina Biaggi, Ode to Kamchatka K-24, Russia, collage

    Background

    Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

    NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design-Make-Play. The defining characteristics of Design-Make-Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

    NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

    About the Position

    In case you didn’t know it, today is kind of a big deal for the Earth.

    Not only is it Earth Day, but leaders of 170 countries are gathering at the United Nations to sign the landmark Paris Agreement. Under the agreement, countries agree to lower their greenhouse gas emissions, which trap heat and contribute to climate change.

    At NYSCI, we understand the power of collaboration. In fact, we built an entire exhibition around it.

    Connected Worlds, our digital immersive exhibition about sustainability, works best when visitors work together. When you visit, you see people doing what you’d expect them to do when faced with this massive, animated world: smiling, squealing, running from screen to screen, and trying out the various gestures that will plant seeds, chop trees and divert water.

    But you often also see something else. A boy showing his mother the proper way to conjure up the digital seeds. A young girl saying to another child that he shouldn’t move that log because the plants on the other side of the room need water.

    In Connected Worlds, the digital environments thrive when people work together to keep them healthy. Plants grow, flowers bloom, happy animals dart around the foliage. Collaboration becomes the key to balancing the entire system. In that way, the exhibition is a lot like a certain planet we all know and love.

     

    Background

    Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

    NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design-Make-Play. The defining characteristics of Design-Make-Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

    NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

    About the Position

    By Michaela Labriole.

    A group of educators huddles around a paint tray. “Whose turn is it to be the storm this time?”

    The designated “storm” pours water over a model city contained in the tray, while the other group members watch. Sponges representing things like parks or green roofs absorb the water. “We did it! Look! We prevented the trash from flowing into the river.”

    While this might seem like an experiment about street trash or the water cycle, these teachers were actually investigating how climate change is impacting New York City and the many city systems local residents rely on. Rather than learning about climate change as a collection of discreet facts to be memorized, the educators in this professional development program learned to apply systems thinking to the complex topic of climate change impacts and solutions.

    Staff from the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) facilitated this particular workshop as part of the Climate and Urban System Partnership (CUSP), a project between scientists and educators aimed at engaging city dwellers in climate change issues. The workshop participants explored the interplay between increased frequency of heavy rainstorms caused by climate change, an overloading of the wastewater system, and water management options afforded by green infrastructure projects.

    One participant said of her workshop experience:

    “(Prior to the workshop) When I thought about climate change, I thought about severe heat waves – you know, global warming. I didn’t think about rainstorms or street flooding. And I didn’t realize that we were already seeing effects of a changing climate. And I definitely had no idea how to fit this into my curriculum!”

    This teacher is not alone. A recent report, published in Science, reveals that while a majority of teachers in the United States do teach about climate change, they spend, on average, just one to two hours per academic year on the topic. Additionally, a large percentage of the teachers included in the study were found to include incorrect or inaccurate information in their teachings about climate change.

    A recent article in the New York Times notes that this level of confusion among educators may not be surprising. Many teachers didn’t have exposure to climate change information as part of their science education training and some educators may lack the confidence needed to successfully teach the subject matter fully.

    Still, while climate change is not universally included in a standard curriculum, the importance of teaching about climate change is increasingly recognized and the topic is included in the new Next Generation Science Standards.

    To address the findings of the report, it isn’t enough to simply provide teachers with more information about climate change. Traditionally, climate change has been taught using the information-deficit approach to education. Under this model, it is assumed that learners simply lack information about a topic, and that providing more information is sufficient to help people understand a concept.

    While prevalent, the information-deficit model has been shown to be ineffective in teaching about climate change. In fact, in some cases, people feel so overwhelmed by the information, they simply ignore it (Moser and Dilling 2011).1

    It’s time to move away from an information-deficit approach and embrace a systems thinking approach.

    Systems thinking is the process of examining and understanding the various parts of a system and the interactions among these components. A systems thinking approach allows both teachers and students to see complex science concepts as part of a bigger picture.

    For climate change education in particular, it’s important to take a step back and examine the impacts the changing climate has on all areas of our lives: local wildlife, flooding, public transit, water quality, etc. Similarly, what opportunities for solutions exist?

    By taking a systems approach to climate change in teacher professional development, teachers are empowered to decide how the big ideas in climate change fit in with their curriculum.

    NYSCI uses a system approach in its professional development workshops. The workshops combat misconceptions and help educators see climate change as a cross-disciplinary issue relevant to their lives and the lives of their students.

    For example, as part of the CUSP project, NYSCI develops educational opportunities, like the paint tray stormwater runoff workshop, that help learners make connections between local climate change impacts and solutions, city systems, and their own personal interests and passions.

    By understanding the complex interactions involved in a changing climate, teachers increase their own confidence in teaching about these intricate relationships, to evaluate climate change information they come across in the media, and to connect climate change content to things that are relevant to their students’ lives.

    Systems thinking at NYSCI is not limited to teacher professional development workshops or even to programs about climate change. It is also a key component of events such as SUBMERGE, NYSCI’s annual marine science festival, or in experiences like NYSCI’s immersive sustainability exhibition, Connected Worlds.

    1Moser, S.C., and Dilling, L. (2011). Communicating Climate Change: Closing The Science –Action Gap. The Oxford Handbook of Climate Change and Society (pp. 161-176). Eds. J.S. Dryzek, R.B. Norgaard, and D. Schlosberg. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.

    As manager of special projects for NYSCI, Michaela Labriole oversees NYSCI’s online programs for educators. Her expertise includes climate change education and programs that engage girls in STEM.

     

    Background

    Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

    NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design-Make-Play. The defining characteristics of Design-Make-Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

    NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

    About the Position

    Bend, twist, light, sculpt and animate a new version of the holiday season with workshops, demos, artist installations and more. ReMake the Holidays is a response to increased consumption and waste during the holiday season and an attempt to give people pause, inspiration and options to do things differently, while having fun! This year’s event will focus on a different recyclable material each day. Daily features include ice sculpting with Bill Bywater and the Climate Confessional that will be recorded and aired on The Adaptors. Activities are free with NYSCI admission, unless otherwise noted.

    December 27: Plastic Projects
    •    Jump into the New Year by making plastic bag jump ropes with the folks from Skraptacular.
    •    Hand cut stickers and holiday cards with NYSCI’s Maker Space staff.
    •    Holiday light hacking with NYSCI Explainers.
    •    Make a plastic bottle lantern with NYSCI Explainers.

    December 28: Paper Projects
    •    Make eco pop-up puppets with Skraptacular.
    •    Create paper lanterns with NYSCI’s Maker Space staff.
    •    Paper Gadgets: Activate your paper sculptures with light and sound with Invent-abling.
    •    Join a button-making workshop with NYSCI Explainers.
    •    Create “recyle-gami” with Fold and Tell.

    December 29: Fabric & Sewing Projects
    •    Skrap Fabric Frenzy – Make fun outfits for cork and wire dolls with Skraptacular.
    •    ReMake the Fabric Patch with Embroidery in NYSCI’s Maker Space.
    •    Learn to sew and remake your fabric with Joe Beau Ties. Sessions: 12:30; 1:30 & 2:30 pm. Register now. $6 per person, plus NYSCI admission. (Members: $4 per person.)

    •    Control Colors with Soft Circuits! – Learn how to sew a light circuit with switches that allow you to change the color of the light with Invent-abling.

    •    Little Makers: In Stitches — Explore new tools and materials while practicing hand sewing skills.

    •    Print fabric with NYSCI Explainers. Participants will need to preregister online and bring their own fabric item to remake. Sessions: noon, 12:30, 1, 1:30, 2:30, 3, & 3:30 pm. Register now. $3 per person, plus NYSCI admission. (Members: $2 per person.)

    December 30: Metal and Glass Projects

    •    Wired to Wire – Make cork and wire dolls with Skraptacular.
    •    Create lanterns out of soda cans with NYSCI’s Maker Space staff.
    •    Holiday light hacking with NYSCI Explainers.
    •    Join our Glass bottle Vase Etching workshop with NYSCI Explainers. Participants will need to preregister online and bring their own glass bottle to remake. Sessions: noon, 12:30, 1, 1:30, 2:30, 3 & 3:30 pm. Register now. $3 per person, plus NYSCI admission. (Members: $2 per person.)

    ReMake Late: For Adults (December 30, 5 – 8 pm; $15 per person; $11 per Member)
    Kids shouldn’t have all the fun this holiday season! ReMake activities and workshops will continue into the evening on December 30 so adults can also join in on this annual making festival.
    •    Ice sculpt with Bill Bywater.

    •    The Climate Confessional by The Adaptors.

    •    Sew to remake fabric items with with Joe Beau Ties.

    •    Activating Origami – Paper does not have to sit still! Experiment with folding, structure and basic vibrational movement to bring your paper sculptures to life. With simple re-useable parts and instruction from Invent-abling, you will learn how to make a basic paper robot.
    •    Join our Glass Bottle Etching workshop with NYSCI Explainers.

     

    Daily Features

    NYSCI’s favorite ice sculptor, Bill Bywater, will focus his ice sculpting skills to highlight endangered wildlife, while providing audience members with an on-going demonstration of ice sculpting tools and techniques. Daily demonstrations: Ice Sculpting Tools at 2:30pm; The Albedo Effect at 3 pm.

    The Climate Confessional

    Confess the thing you’re doing – or not doing – that makes you feel guilty about climate change. During peak times, climate counselors—Sara Harris, Katie Mandes, Zack Kopplin and Beth Karlin—will be available to offer “penance” and solutions to help ease your conscience. Your confession will be recorded and aired on The Adaptors, a new public radio podcast and website with host Flora Lichtman that tells the stories of people adapting to a changing planet. The new podcast is a project from SoundVision Productions in Berkeley with support from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

     

    Sara Harris
    Senior Instructor
    Dept of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences
    University of British Columbia
    Vancouver, BC

    Sara Harris teaches climate science at the University of British Columbia. Her current research explores people’s ideas about how Earth’s climate system works and what learning opportunities best help people develop informed opinions about climate change. She has co-authored a book called “Understanding Climate Change: Science, Policy and Practice” (2014), and co-instructed a Massive Open Online Course called “Climate Literacy: Navigating Climate Change Conversations” which involved tens of thousand of participants from around the world.

    Sara’s research background is in reconstructing past variations in Earth’s oceans and climate system. She has also studied modern oceans and sailed thousands of miles with undergraduate students, as a chief scientist at Sea Education Association in Woods Hole, Massachusetts.

     

    Beth Karlin
    Director, Transformational Media Lab
    University of California Irvine
    Irvine, CA

    Beth Karlin founded and directs the Transformational Media Lab at UC Irvine, where she studies the psychology of leveraging technology for social change. Current projects investigate energy conservation, documentary film, and digital activism. Beth has published in venues ranging from peace studies to persuasive technology and lectures regularly on Transformational Media and the Psychology of Sustainability. She earned her Bachelors degree in Psychology, Masters in Public Policy and Administration and Ph.D. in Social Ecology with an emphasis in Environmental Psychology.

     

    Katie Mandes
    Vice President for Community Engagement
    Director, Make an Impact, Center for Climate and Energy Solutions
    Arlington, VA

    Katie Mandes is Vice President for Community Engagement and Director of Make an Impact at the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES). She is responsible for education and outreach to communities, employees and consumers, and directs the center’s employee engagement and sustainability programs. These include Make an Impact, a program designed to empower employees and local communities to understand and reduce their individual environmental impact. Started in 2007 with founding partner Alcoa, the program has grown to include Entergy and Bank of America and has reached more than 380,000 people. The program is available in the U.S., UK, Hong Kong, and Brazil.

     

    Zack Kopplin
    Science Education Activist
    Undergraduate, Rice University
    Houston, TX

    Zack Kopplin is a science education activist who has fought against creationism being taught with public money. He’s an undergraduate at Rice University and a graduate of Baton Rouge Magnet High School. Zack grew up in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Since June, 2010, Zack has led the effort to repeal the Louisiana Science Education Act, which promotes the teaching of creationism and intelligent design in public school science class.

     

    ReMake the Holidays is generously supported by Astoria Bank.

    AstoriaBankLogo2014

    Background

    Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

    NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design-Make-Play. The defining characteristics of Design-Make-Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

    NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

    About the Position

    Bend, twist, light, sculpt and animate a new version of the holiday season with workshops, demos, artist installations and more. ReMake the Holidays is a response to increased consumption and waste during the holiday season and an attempt to give people pause, inspiration and options to do things differently, while having fun! This year’s event will focus on a different recyclable material each day. Daily features include ice sculpting with Bill Bywater and the Climate Confessional that will be recorded and aired on The Adaptors. Activities are free with NYSCI admission, unless otherwise noted.

    December 27: Plastic Projects
    •    Jump into the New Year by making plastic bag jump ropes with the folks from Skraptacular.
    •    Hand cut stickers and holiday cards with NYSCI’s Maker Space staff.
    •    Holiday light hacking with NYSCI Explainers.
    •    Make a plastic bottle lantern with NYSCI Explainers.

    December 28: Paper Projects
    •    Make eco pop-up puppets with Skraptacular.
    •    Create paper lanterns with NYSCI’s Maker Space staff.
    •    Paper Gadgets: Activate your paper sculptures with light and sound with Invent-abling.
    •    Join a button-making workshop with NYSCI Explainers.
    •    Create “recyle-gami” with Fold and Tell.

    December 29: Fabric & Sewing Projects
    •    Skrap Fabric Frenzy – Make fun outfits for cork and wire dolls with Skraptacular.
    •    ReMake the Fabric Patch with Embroidery in NYSCI’s Maker Space.
    •    Learn to sew and remake your fabric with Joe Beau Ties. Sessions: 12:30; 1:30 & 2:30 pm. Register now. $6 per person, plus NYSCI admission. (Members: $4 per person.)

    •    Control Colors with Soft Circuits! – Learn how to sew a light circuit with switches that allow you to change the color of the light with Invent-abling.

    •    Little Makers: In Stitches — Explore new tools and materials while practicing hand sewing skills.

    •    Print fabric with NYSCI Explainers. Participants will need to preregister online and bring their own fabric item to remake. Sessions: noon, 12:30, 1, 1:30, 2:30, 3, & 3:30 pm. Register now. $3 per person, plus NYSCI admission. (Members: $2 per person.)

    December 30: Metal and Glass Projects

    •    Wired to Wire – Make cork and wire dolls with Skraptacular.
    •    Create lanterns out of soda cans with NYSCI’s Maker Space staff.
    •    Holiday light hacking with NYSCI Explainers.
    •    Join our Glass bottle Vase Etching workshop with NYSCI Explainers. Participants will need to preregister online and bring their own glass bottle to remake. Sessions: noon, 12:30, 1, 1:30, 2:30, 3 & 3:30 pm. Register now. $3 per person, plus NYSCI admission. (Members: $2 per person.)

    ReMake Late: For Adults (December 30, 5 – 8 pm; $15 per person; $11 per Member)
    Kids shouldn’t have all the fun this holiday season! ReMake activities and workshops will continue into the evening on December 30 so adults can also join in on this annual making festival.
    •    Ice sculpt with Bill Bywater.

    •    The Climate Confessional by The Adaptors.

    •    Sew to remake fabric items with with Joe Beau Ties.

    •    Activating Origami – Paper does not have to sit still! Experiment with folding, structure and basic vibrational movement to bring your paper sculptures to life. With simple re-useable parts and instruction from Invent-abling, you will learn how to make a basic paper robot.

    •    Join our Glass Bottle Etching workshop with NYSCI Explainers.

    •    Get creative with those champagne cork baskets with Skraptacular.

     

    Daily Features

    NYSCI’s favorite ice sculptor, Bill Bywater, will focus his ice sculpting skills to highlight endangered wildlife, while providing audience members with an on-going demonstration of ice sculpting tools and techniques. Daily demonstrations: Ice Sculpting Tools at 2:30pm; The Albedo Effect at 3 pm.

    The Climate Confessional

    Confess the thing you’re doing – or not doing – that makes you feel guilty about climate change. During peak times, climate counselors—Sara Harris, Katie Mandes, Zack Kopplin and Beth Karlin—will be available to offer “penance” and solutions to help ease your conscience. Your confession will be recorded and aired on The Adaptors, a new public radio podcast and website with host Flora Lichtman that tells the stories of people adapting to a changing planet. The new podcast is a project from SoundVision Productions in Berkeley with support from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

     

    Sara Harris
    Senior Instructor
    Dept of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences
    University of British Columbia
    Vancouver, BC

    Sara Harris teaches climate science at the University of British Columbia. Her current research explores people’s ideas about how Earth’s climate system works and what learning opportunities best help people develop informed opinions about climate change. She has co-authored a book called “Understanding Climate Change: Science, Policy and Practice” (2014), and co-instructed a Massive Open Online Course called “Climate Literacy: Navigating Climate Change Conversations” which involved tens of thousand of participants from around the world.

    Sara’s research background is in reconstructing past variations in Earth’s oceans and climate system. She has also studied modern oceans and sailed thousands of miles with undergraduate students, as a chief scientist at Sea Education Association in Woods Hole, Massachusetts.

     

    Beth Karlin
    Director, Transformational Media Lab
    University of California Irvine
    Irvine, CA

    Beth Karlin founded and directs the Transformational Media Lab at UC Irvine, where she studies the psychology of leveraging technology for social change. Current projects investigate energy conservation, documentary film, and digital activism. Beth has published in venues ranging from peace studies to persuasive technology and lectures regularly on Transformational Media and the Psychology of Sustainability. She earned her Bachelors degree in Psychology, Masters in Public Policy and Administration and Ph.D. in Social Ecology with an emphasis in Environmental Psychology.

     

    Katie Mandes
    Vice President for Community Engagement
    Director, Make an Impact, Center for Climate and Energy Solutions
    Arlington, VA

    Katie Mandes is Vice President for Community Engagement and Director of Make an Impact at the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES). She is responsible for education and outreach to communities, employees and consumers, and directs the center’s employee engagement and sustainability programs. These include Make an Impact, a program designed to empower employees and local communities to understand and reduce their individual environmental impact. Started in 2007 with founding partner Alcoa, the program has grown to include Entergy and Bank of America and has reached more than 380,000 people. The program is available in the U.S., UK, Hong Kong, and Brazil.

     

    Zack Kopplin
    Science Education Activist
    Undergraduate, Rice University
    Houston, TX

    Zack Kopplin is a science education activist who has fought against creationism being taught with public money. He’s an undergraduate at Rice University and a graduate of Baton Rouge Magnet High School. Zack grew up in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Since June, 2010, Zack has led the effort to repeal the Louisiana Science Education Act, which promotes the teaching of creationism and intelligent design in public school science class.

     

    ReMake the Holidays is generously supported by Astoria Bank.

    AstoriaBankLogo2014

    Background

    Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

    NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design-Make-Play. The defining characteristics of Design-Make-Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

    NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

    About the Position

    With support from Deutsche Asset & Wealth Management, NYSCI created My Carbon Footprint, an educational initiative designed to build awareness about climate change science.

    My Carbon Footprint includes a middle school and high school curriculum. The curriculums are designed to help educators integrate global climate change into their lesson planning with hands-on activities that engage students, all while aligning with science standards. Taken as a whole, My Carbon Footprint gives students the foundation they need to understand climate change and its related issues.

    For a free copy of the curriculums or to explore the project’s online community, visit mycarbonfootprint.nysci.org.

    NYSCI’s My Carbon Footprint is presented by Deutsche Asset & Wealth Management.