Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

This spring, 5,400 K–8th grade students in New York City Title 1 schools will visit NYSCI as part of Google Field Trip Days. Title 1 schools have a high percentage of low-income students, and programs such as the Google Field Trip Days ensure that the students have access to the educational programs and activities that NYSCI offers.

Through the support of Google , Title 1 schools can choose from two special offerings: free field trips with hands-on activities in Design Lab and Maker Space, or free educational enrichment activities such as hands-on Design Lab Activity Sessions , 3D Theater Presentations, or  Connected Worlds Sessions.

Last October, Google funded a similar program , which reached more than 2,200 elementary and middle school students throughout the five boroughs.

Title 1 schools in New York City who are interested in participating in this program, can inquire via our online form or call 718-699-0301.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

NYSCI will be open on Monday, January 18, 2016. This weekend, we will feature new activities from 1 – 4 pm on Saturday and Sunday, and 11 am – 4:30 pm on Monday. Activities will include one or more of the following:

Contraption Challenge
Join us in using the philosophy of Design-Make-Play as we repurpose household items and build an imaginative mechanism to meet a challenge, all while using NYSCI’s design process.

Noticing Tools
Use our NYSCI developed apps to explore body movement, motion, force and energy in all your playful activities. Create hilarious photo mashups and animations.

Sound Exploration
Did you hear that? Sound is buzzing all around us; some loud, some soft, and in high and low pitch. In this activity, make different materials vibrate and discover what causes them to create the different melodies we hear.
Other activities this weekend include Make It: One Block Challenge, Little Makers: Edible Play Dough, and Tinker It Sunday.

This weekend, we are open:
Saturday, January 16; 10 am – 6 pm
Sunday, January 17; 10 am – 6 pm
Monday, January 18; 9:30 am – 5 pm

Free general admission will be offered on Sunday from 10 – 11 am. General admission does not include 3D Theater Presentations or workshop fees.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Start the New Year off right with a visit to NYSCI. We’re open all weekend, including New Year’s Day!

Special activities this weekend include Disney’s Frozen in 3D, Make It: One Block Challenge, Ooey Gooey Polymers, and Tinker It Sunday. Plus, be sure to see GingerBread Lane, the Guinness World Record holder for the world’s largest gingerbread village.

This weekend, we are open:
Friday, January 1; 9:30 am – 5 pm
Saturday, January 2; 10 am – 6 pm
Sunday, January 3; 10 am – 6 pm

Free general admission will be offered on Friday from 2 – 5 pm and Sunday from 10 – 11 am. General admission does not include 3D Theater Presentations or workshop fees.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Seidenberg Family Top of the Ladder Award
Brittany Roopnarine
Senior Explainer, NYSCI

Brittany Roopnarine started working at NYSCI in her sophomore year of high school as an Explainer trainee. Two years into the Science Career Ladder program, she became a senior Explainer. Now a freshman at Manhattan College, she still works within the Science Career Ladder while studying chemical engineering.

Brittany credits NYSCI and the Science Career Ladder for helping her choose her major due to supports and resources such as personal mentoring, career fairs and opportunities to speak with professionals in the engineering field.

More than 3,000 students have worked as Explainers at NYSCI since 1986, of which 92 percent have obtained college or advanced degrees, compared to just 39 percent for an age-comparable New York City cohort. The Top of the Ladder Award celebrates the work that all NYSCI Explainers do, and most importantly, recognizes an individual who went above and beyond to support NYSCI’s mission.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

For the third consecutive year, GingerBread Lane has won the Guinness World Record for the largest gingerbread village in the world. Chef and creator of GingerBread Lane, Jon Lovitch, has won the record since 2013. This year’s village is his largest yet, with 1,120 structures covering 500 square feet. Structures include a double-decker Coney Island-style carousel, the S.C. Kringle & Co. Department Store evoking Gimbels in the early 1900s, The Pumpkin Spice Latte Coffee Shoppe, and The EveryDay’s Thanksgiving Café.

GingerBread Lane is on view through January 9, 2016 and is free with NYSCI admission.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

NYSCI has launched a new initiative to create a partnership between the museum and the communities it serves most directly with the creation of Queens 2020. Co-designed with educators, parents and school administrators from the communities neighboring NYSCI, Queens 2020 aims to create an ecosystem for improving STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) teaching and learning by developing new programs and engagement strategies to address unmet needs voiced by community stakeholders.

Queens 2020 will engage children and families in creative STEM learning, develop resources for teachers and students, build out-of-school STEM opportunities, and support STEM learning for high school and college students,” said Margaret Honey, president and CEO of NYSCI. “The program also aims to increase participation among Queens students in STEM focused high schools and AP courses, as well as broadening participation in programs created by NYSCI’s Alan J. Friedman Center for the Development of Young Scientists.”

NYSCI announced Queens 2020 during a meeting of the STEM Ecosystems Initiative in Washington D.C. led by the STEM Funders Network, which earlier this year announced more than $20 million in funding to 27 inaugural communities, including the Queens 2020 network. The STEM Ecosystems Initiative has a goal of reaching 600,000 teachers and students in its first three years. The convening brought together a growing community of practice of local leaders who are expanding STEM opportunities in their communities. The education, business and community leaders who participated also met with White House officials to discuss equitable STEM education and federal STEM policy.

Queens2020Panel

In the initial phase of Queens 2020, NYSCI is engaging in conversations to determine the community’s most urgent priorities for STEM education services. Gathering perspectives from educators, school administrators, parents, community leaders and other stakeholders, Queens 2020 will engender broad-scale, cross-sector collaborations to nurture and scale effective STEM learning opportunities for young people. In early 2016, NYSCI will form an advisory board and host a series of activity and feedback sessions that will determine the blueprint for projects to be undertaken in subsequent years.

Queens 2020 will be led by Andrés Henríquez, who has joined NYSCI as vice president of STEM learning in communities. He brings a broad expertise to this position, having worked previously as a program officer at both the National Science Foundation and the Carnegie Corporation of New York where he launched a national program to develop the field of adolescent literacy and also was a key contributor to the National Research Council’s Framework for K–12 Science Education, and the funding of Achieve Inc. to develop the framework-aligned Next Generation Science Standards. Earlier in his career at the Center for Children and Technology (CCT), he was part of the community transformation in Union City, N.J., where he lead a partnership between Bell Atlantic and the Union City Schools, culminating in Union City receiving national recognition when President Clinton and Vice President Gore acknowledged the extraordinary accomplishments of the school district, which ultimately became the model for a five-year, $2 billion program to put computers in all U.S. classrooms.

“I’m excited to be joining NYSCI in this endeavor to implement high-quality and high-engagement STEM programs into this community that has such high aspirations for their children,” said Henríquez. “This collaborative effort will allow us to take the best of what we know about STEM education and the needs of the future workforce. It’ll be so gratifying to build on the work that I’ve done in research, policy and practice and my experience with foundations locally and around the country.”

Queens 2020 is made possible with the generous support of The Simons Foundation.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

The National Science Foundation recently announced the formation of Big Data Innovation Hubs across the United States, and NYSCI is a founding member of the Northeast regional effort. NYSCI will serve as the outreach and education partner for the Northeast Big Data Hub, working with other partners to develop new and accessible ways for citizens to engage with and learn about big data and their impact on society. NYSCI will extend over a decade of experience in bringing big data to teachers and learners, and an expanding learning research agenda to develop outreach programs, learning research projects and partnerships with the K–16 education community.

Data literacy is crucial to 21st century citizenship, yet there are very limited resources and no formal frameworks for the teaching and learning communities or lifelong learners to support data literacy efforts. NYSCI is dedicated to making important yet abstract concepts meaningful to learners so that they become self-motivated in their learning. One of NYSCI’s key research goals is the understanding of the foundational processes children need to build so that they have a solid foundation of analytical competencies, making them smart consumers in a world laden with data as well as smart users of computational techniques in every discipline. NYSCI’s role is to better prepare the future workforce to deal with the implications of data sciences that intimately affect the lives of all people, and to make data literacy an important aspect of teaching and learning.

Led by Columbia University and funded by the National Science Foundation, this $1.25 million research project will share data, tools and ideas for confronting some of the biggest challenges facing the northeastern United States, including health care, energy, urbanization, natural science and education. The Hub consists of 40 partners, including those in industry, academia, government and non-profits, and covers nine states: New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Connecticut.

The first workshop for the Northeast Big Data Hub will be held on December 16 at Columbia University.

 

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

noticing_page
NYSCI’s Noticing Tools™, a suite of five math and science apps, has been selected as a Science Learning Challenge winner by NewSchools Venture Fund, a philanthropic investor headquartered in Oakland, Calif. NewSchools Ignite supports entrepreneurs working to address the most pressing gaps in K–12 education technology, specifically engaging a broad array of learners in science. The award includes a generous grant, along with business advisory support and access to a team of cognitive scientists focused on applying the latest in learning science to product design. Competition for this program was intense – although more than 100 companies and organizations applied, NYSCI is one of only 15 selected to be part of NewSchools Ignite’s first cohort.

The Noticing Tools™ suite of iPad apps helps students make mathematics discoveries through their own play and compelling and playful design projects. One of the apps in this suite, Playground Physics, was among Fast Company’s 2015 Innovation By Design Award Winners for Data Visualization and was named a Best New App in the worldwide App Store following its launch.

appstore_badge
 

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

More than 600 students will participate in Con Edison’s STEM Days Out, a free program that aims to stimulate interest among children in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). The program will be held at NYSCI on the first Wednesday of each month, from now through May 2016.

“Children learn best when they are engaged in hands-on activities that matter to them,” said Margaret Honey, president and CEO of NYSCI. “That’s why it’s so important to provide programs such as Con Edison’s STEM Days Out, where kids are actively involved in experimenting, creating and making.”

Students who participate in Con Edison’s STEM Days Out at NYSCI will engage in engineering design challenges, including building large structures using wooden dowels and rubber bands, and designing tabletop structures using cardstock, LEDs, motors and circuits.

“Students will see and touch exhibits that they don’t have in their classrooms,” said Hilary Ayala, Con Edison director of strategic partnerships. “This is a chance for us to support teachers and students in our local schools.”

The Title 1 public middle schools selected to participate in the program will come from neighborhoods throughout New York City.

Con Edison’s STEM Days Out at NYSCI is made possible through a $25,000 grant from Con Edison. Con Edison provides more than $10 million in financial and in-kind contributions to students and nonprofits in New York City and Westchester that enhance STEM education. Funding includes support for scholarships to students majoring in STEM fields, as well as program support for summer internships and year-round programs benefitting underprivileged and minority students.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

On October 15, more than 900 students participated in a Google Field Trip Day at NYSCI. One of three Google Field Trip Days at the museum, the experience was offered free of charge to New York City Title 1 schools. The day included science demonstrations, entry to the 3D Theater or Science Playground, free lunch, and exploration of more than 450 exhibits, including NYSCI’s newest exhibition, Connected Worlds.

The Google Field Trip Day also included a variety of hands-on STEM activities. Students created paper helicopters and airplanes to test flight patterns, donned color filter visors to see how they affected perception, created a gooey green substance to explore polymers, and used circuit blocks, wires, batteries and buzzers to learn about electricity.

The third and final Google Field Trip Day will be held at NYSCI on October 20. Over the three days, the program will reach more than 2,200 elementary and middle school students throughout the five boroughs.

NYSCI is able to offer these special Google Field Trip Days thanks to a partnership with Google.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

noticingpress_page
NYSCI’s Noticing Tools™, launched in 2015, are a ground-breaking suite of iPad apps that make learning math and science irresistible through play, creative design projects, and collaboration. Here’s what the press have to say about these unique digital tools:

  • Fast Co. Design: “Want Kids To Be More Interested in STEM Classes? There’s An App For That”
  • New York Times: “Apps to Bring Math and Science Skills Back After Summer’s Slide”
  • Fast Company: Noticing Tools™ Awarded With Innovation by Design Award for Data Visualization

 

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Due to inclement weather today, Submerge NYC Marine Festival is cancelled.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

While you’re at World Maker Faire, be sure to bring the kids to NYSCI Village. This area consists of kid-friendly activities designed by NYSCI staff, interns and partners.

This year’s NYSCI Village includes:

Non-Newtonian Rush – Can you walk across the Oobleck tub without sinking? Oobleck is a non-Newtonian fluid with properties of both liquids and solids. Stand still and you’ll sink, but keep moving and the oobleck will offer you a more solid footing. This activity was created by NYSCI’s Science Career Ladder, our signature education program for high school and college students.

All Charged Up! – See how small charges can make a big difference as you watch lightning being created with a Van der Graaf generator. This activity was created by NYSCI’s Science Career Ladder, our signature education program for high school and college students.

FreeFall – See if you can win a race against gravity in this activity created by NYSCI’s Science Career Ladder.

Noticing Tools™ – Create hilarious photo mashups and forced perspective scenes, animate a dance, build a 3D model, and discover the physics in your own motion, all using NYSCI’s new Noticing Tools™, a suite of iPad apps designed for kids.

Innovation Institute: From Problem to Product – Get inspired by high school students who, in only 15 months, have created innovative products to help resolve common issues and needs in the community. The students are part of NYSCI’s Innovation Institute, a program of the Alan J. Friedman Center for the Development of Young Scientists.

Cardboard Creations – See what you can tinker and make using cardboard boxes, packing peanuts and your imagination in this activity that affirms the adage that “the box is more interesting than the toy.” This activity was created by NYSCI’s Education Services Department.

Team Textiles – Explore the structure of woven and knit fabrics, and then leave your mark on this large fabric art project that will grow throughout the day. This activity was created by NYSCI’s Design Lab staff.

Roar Into STEM – Learn how to drive a robot, build a circuit, and create your own 3D printer. This activity is a collaboration between NYSCI’s Information Technology Department and The RoboTigers.

 

Pictured: A visitor to World Maker Faire 2015 experiments with a Van der Graaf generator at NYSCI Village. Photo by Andrew Kelly.

 

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

With robots that play hockey, robots that make music, and even fully functional R2-D2 robots, World Maker Faire is a robot lover’s dream.

But at 28 feet tall, Robot Resurrection demands attention from every visitor to the Faire. Made from 95 percent airplane parts, the robot’s arms and head not only move, but also emit fire. It took maker Shane Evans about seven months to create the 870-pound structure.

See Robot Resurrection and dozens of other robots at World Maker Faire.

 

Pictured: Robot Resurrection at World Maker Faire 2015. Photo by David Handschuh.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

For the first time ever, Eepybird will be performing their Coke Zero & Mentos Fountains show at the iconic Unisphere in Flushing Meadows Corona Park. The performance is free; no tickets are required.

The Coke Zero & Mentos Fountains performance is a live science experiment featuring skyrocketing geysers of Coke Zero. During the show, Fritz Grobe and Stephen Voltz, the two men behind Eepybird, explain how they create the Coke Zero geysers and how they direct the spray of the sugary liquid for a Bellagio Fountains-like spectacle. They even give hints and tips for trying this experiment at home.

The free show is part of the 6th annual World Maker Faire, held at NYSCI. Performances will take place at 6 pm on both Saturday, September 26 and Sunday, September 27.

 

Pictured: Eepybird performs at the Unisphere for World Maker Faire 2015. Photo by David Handschuh.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Teachers looking for Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) resources now have 17 new options to choose from. The Teacher TryScience website now features a growing set of resources that demonstrate how existing K-12 science lessons can be evaluated and revised to more closely align to the NGSS, using the Educators Evaluating Quality in Instructional Products (EQuIP) rubric. Using the EQuIP process, NYSCI educators have revised existing lessons, making them more rigorous, engaging, and ultimately more informative for teachers.

Through a partnership supported by IBM, NYSCI and Achieve, the nonprofit organization that helped develop NGSS, began collaborating on the lessons in 2014. The free lessons, designed for students in late elementary through high school, cover topics as varied as air pollution, solar design, food packaging, wind power and biodiversity. Along with the lessons, EQuIP Rubrics, outlines and other materials are also available. Lessons are also aligned with the Common Core Standards for Mathematics (CCSM) and the Common Core Standards for English Language Arts (ELA).

The lessons and supporting materials can be downloaded for free at teacherstryscience.com/ngsslanding.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

On August 17, NYSCI visited the Nasdaq MarketSite in Times Square to ring the Opening Bell. The occasion marked the release of the Noticing Tools™, a groundbreaking suite of iPad apps that will aid parents and educators in teaching children math and science concepts. Margaret Honey, NYSCI’s president and chief executive officer, rang the Opening Bell and was presented with a commemorative gift by Anna Ewing, executive vice president and chief information officer of Nasdaq, and a trustee of NYSCI.

The Opening Bell ceremony was broadcast live by CNBC, Bloomberg, Fox Business News and BNN, and via a live feed on the Nasdaq Tower in Times Square and on nasdaq.com.

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Above photo: NYSCI staff, trustees and friends gather at the Nasdaq MarketSite in Times Square to ring the Opening Bell. Photo by Christopher Galluzzo, (c) 2015, The NASDAQ OMX Group, Inc.

Top photo: NYSCI’s Margaret Honey is presented with a special gift by Nasdaq’s Anna Ewing. Photo by Christopher Galluzzo, (c) 2015, The NASDAQ OMX Group, Inc.

View additional photos from the event on our Flickr site.

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Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

NYSCI’s five new iPad apps will motivate students to learn fundamental math and science concepts and give teachers and parents a set of mobile resources that can inspire children’s everyday explorations in the classroom, at home, on the playground or just about anywhere else. Collectively known as Noticing Tools™, the five apps are now available in the App Store. We created Noticing Tools™ in collaboration with Local Projects, a media design firm for museums, brands and public spaces.

The apps that make up the Noticing Tools™ suite embody our Design-Make-Play approach to learning, which invites a broad array of learners to explore complex concepts in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM.) These are among the same concepts that often discourage learners from pursuing STEM education and careers.

With the Noticing Tools™, users can measure distances, capture photos and videos for documentation, and create notations and narratives about all types of data. The apps, designed for students in upper elementary grades through high school, include:

  • Playground Physics – Focuses on the science concepts of force, motion and energy. Using this app, students record ordinary play activities such as tossing a ball and then playback the recording in the motion, energy or force modes to discover and analyze the physics of that activity. The app and accompanying curriculum activities are aligned to the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS).
  • Choreo Graph – Allows users to learn about rotation, translation and reflection. With this app, users create an animated character from photos and explore graphs and coordinate geometry to choreograph dance moves for their character. The app and corresponding curriculum activities address Common Core Math Standards (CCSM).
  • Fraction Mash – App users explore fractions while creating mashups of two or more photos, manipulating the size and number of pieces from each individual photo. The app and accompanying curriculum activities address Common Core Standards for Mathematics (CCSM).
  • Size Wise – Users explore ratios and proportions while creating forced perspective photographs. The app encourages users to reason proportionally while creating images where something large appears small, or vice versa. The app and curriculum activities are aligned to the Common Core Standards for Mathematics (CCSM).
  • Volumize – With this app, users can take two-dimensional photos and make them three-dimensional models. In the process, they’ll explore the relationship between surface area and volume.

Aligned with the Next Generation Science Standards and the Common Core Standards for Mathematics, the open-ended apps and supporting resources offer a creative platform for students of any age to explore math and science through self-guided projects they find intrinsically motivating. Educators and parents will find theNoticing Tools™ useful for doing many types of activities and supporting lesson plans on a broad range of topics. The Noticing Tools™ website also features a gallery of user-created projects to demonstrate the vast potential of the apps.

Noticing Tools™ will be available in the App Store for $2.99 each, or as a bundle for $9.99. For educators, the apps are available through Apple’s Volume Purchase Program, which offers a 50 percent discount for purchases for 20 or more devices. All proceeds support the educational mission of NYSCI.

We’ve developed a starter pack of lessons and usage tips for the apps that are designed for students both in and outside the classroom. These resources can be downloaded for free at noticing.nysci.org.

The development of Noticing Tools™ was made possible with generous support from the US Department of Education Investing in Innovation Award, the National Science Foundation, The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, The Sara Lee Schupf Family Center for Play, Science and Technology Learning (SciPlay), The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, Motorola Solutions Foundation and BNY Mellon Foundation.

App_Store_Badge_135x40_Master_062012

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Anthony Negron, manager of digital programming at NYSCI, shares his experience at this year’s Digital Media and Learning Conference. 

Due to the generosity of The New York Community Trust and the Hive Digital Media Learning Fund, I was able to attend this years Digital Media and Learning Conference in Los Angeles, California. There was a vast assortment of panel sessions and workshops to choose from and I want to highlight some key insights that I was able to walk away with.

One of the first panel sessions I went to was called The Open Show: Connected Learning Without Expensive Acronyms. This session was presented in an engaging, talk show format. A great tool that was shared is http://connectedlearning.tv/case-studies. On this site you can learn about what connected learning is and its six core principles, and review various case studies showing real-world applications. One of the main ideas I walked away with is how connected learning allows your students the ability to feel empowered and address their specific interests in a setting that allows students to learn from each other. This is something we are really excited to implement in our upcoming #TinkerTech program that will start on August 17.

Another session I attended opened with an anecdote from panelist member Sam Dyson, who said he remembered how deeply transformative it was for him when he realized that something he had learned in one class actually connected to something he learned in another class. This session was entitled Blurring Boundaries By Design and it had some amazing people leading the conversation including my mentor and former NYSCI supervisor, Chris Lawrence. Much of the conversation focused around education ecosystems and how improvements could be made when stronger relationships are built among those directly and indirectly involved in educating young people. There were some really amazing takeaways from this session and it helped cement the importance of ourGirls First Digital Studio curriculum that is currently facilitated across multiple sites in New York City including Girl Scouts of Greater NYC, CodorDojo, Sports & Arts in School Foundation and The Parks Department Computer Resource Center. Establishing this network of educators has allowed NYSCI the ability to spread its program to diverse students in New York and learn best practices for facilitating effective design-based learning curriculum to students of different backgrounds.

Something that I truly enjoyed from attending this conference were the Ignite Talks, which can be described as rapid-fire presentations by organizations who shared the amazing work they are doing with youth. There were representatives from the Harry Potter Alliance, ENGage and The Dream Defenders, to name a few. Hopefully at next year’s conference, NYSCI will be a part of the Ignite Talks sharing our#TinkerTech, C3: Collect, Construct, Change and Girls First Digital Studio programs!

 

 

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Suit up as a cosmic explorer, create 3D-printed space gadgets and more. Miles From Tomorrowland: Space Missions, presented with Disney Junior and xPRIZE.

Inspired by Disney Junior’s animated Miles From Tomorrowland, the Missions are part of a nationwide effort to engage children in creating their own out-of-this-world creations.  There’s also chances to win prizes, including 3D printers, Google Cardboard Viewers, and a grand-prize of a trip to Kennedy Space Center to experience space exploration first hand.

Activities daily in our Design Lab. Official Rules and details are available at DisneyJunior.com/SpaceMissions.

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Miles From Tomorrowland: Space Missions was unveiled at NYSCI on July 16 with Miles from Tomorrowland star Adrian Grenier, Bill Nye, and NASA astronauts Dr. Mike Massimino and Dr. Yvonne Cagle getting a chance to try out a few of the space missions themselves alongside students and families from local Boys and Girls Clubs and partners from our NYSCI Neighbors program.

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Bill Nye, with NYSCI Explainers, at the launch of Miles From Tomorrowland: Space Missions

Throughout the summer, science centers across the country, spearheaded by NYSCI , Saint Louis Science Center and COSI in Columbus, Ohio, will feature programming ranging from an immersive Miles from Tomorrowland virtual reality experience to building rockets and creating the surface of a planet.