Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

 

Yesterday was our second annual Bug Day.

We learned about beekeeping and sampled honey with Tim O’Neal of Borough Bees.

We learned about cooking insects, complete with tasting, courtesy of Small Stock Foods’ David Gracer.

We released ladybugs into the wild and had a meet-and-greet with some hissing cockroaches.

Entomologist Louis Sorkin showed off various critters and Craig Zammiello from the New York Entomological Society taught us about arachnids and tropical insects.

This is just a partial list of what went on at Bug Day.

Thanks to all who turned out.  We’ll see you next year.

 

 

Here are a few photos from yesterday.  See more in the NYSCI Flickr Pool.

MORE: Bug Day coverage in the New York Times.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Fifth-Annual World Maker Faire Brings the “Year of The Maker” to New York on September 20 & 21, 2014. Call for Makers and Ticket Sales Now Open

SEBASTOPOL, CA–(Marketwired – Jun 25, 2014) –  World Maker Faire, the Greatest Show (and Tell) on Earth, is making its way back to New York on Saturday, September 20, and Sunday, September 21, 2014, at the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI). This year’s event will prove to be a special one as it coincides with the anniversary celebrations for the 1939-40 and 1964-65 World’s Fairs as well as the “Year of the Maker” celebration for the maker movement. The New York Maker Faire was originally given the “World” moniker as a tribute to NYSCI’s legacy as one of the few remaining World’s Fair pavilions still active in Flushing Meadows Corona Park. World Maker Faire embraces the World’s Fairs’ spirit of making the future through today’s culture, technology, and knowledge, and expands on it by bringing makers of all ages, skill levels, and interests together to share their intellectual and creative wealth. NYSCI and World Maker Faire are planning special activities to celebrate the lasting legacy and spirit of the World’s Fairs.

Kicking off the event’s planning process is the Call for Makers, open now through Sunday, July 20, 2014. World Maker Faire encourages makers from New York and beyond to submit an entry form to bring their project to the Faire for all to see. They’ll be able to share their amazing work, and do-it-yourself (or do-it-together) attitude, with an audience hungry to learn more about making.

Entry Information & Forms: http://makerfaire.com/new-york-2014/call-for-makers/
When: September 20 & 21, 2014
Where: New York Hall of Science, Queens, NY
Entry Closes: Sunday, July 20, 2014, at 12:00 am PDT

The following topics are examples of the types of work World Maker Faire is seeking to showcase at the event. Exhibits that are interactive and highlight the process of making are particularly encouraged.

  • Student projects
  • Robotics
  • Homegrown Drones
  • Electronics, Arduino projects, Raspberry Pi, Galileo, BeagleBone, etc.
  • Space projects
  • Food makers (not concessionaries), homesteaders, urban farming, etc.
  • Conductive materials projects
  • Kit makers
  • Interactive art projects
  • 3D Printers and CNC Mills
  • Textile Arts and Crafts
  • E-Textiles, wearables, etc.
  • Home Energy Monitoring
  • Rockets and RC Toys
  • Sustainability & Green Tech
  • Radios, Vintage Computers and Game Systems
  • Electric Vehicles
  • Science, Biology/Biotech, and Chemistry projects
  • Puppets, Kites, and Other Whimsical Creations
  • Bicycles
  • Large-scale Art
  • Shelter (Tents, Domes, etc.)
  • Music Performances and Participation
  • Unusual Tools or Machines
  • How to Fix Things or Take them Apart (Vacuums, Clocks, Washing Machines, etc.)

Tickets are also on sale now for World Maker Faire New York 2014 at http://makerfaireny2014.eventbrite.com at early bird pricing. Early bird pricing is available between now and July 31, 2014 ($12.50 – $27.50 for a single day pass; $20.00-$50.00 for weekend passes). Advance ticket sales take place between August 1 and September 19, 2014. Tickets will also be available for purchase on-site at World Maker Faire New York 2014 on September 20-21, 2014.

 

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

The Atomarium planned for the Hall of Science in 1967 would be the largest of its kind in the country. It was to feature a working nuclear reactor and an operating gamma-ray irradiator. The internal works of the devices would be visible to public audiences watching from an amphitheater above.  They would peer down into the 250-kilowatt reactor and see the irradiator’s series of 18-inch long rods–which had 30,000 curies of cobalt-60 contained within–immersed in water. When the reactor went “critical,” visitors would see the blue Cerenkov glow of the nuclear cores.

atomarium sketch1

Read more about the history of the New York Hall of Science in the NYSCI Archives.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

marsover_page
Last week, NYSCI’s Mars Rover, named “Genevieve”, visited the White House as part of the first White House Maker Faire. Genevieve is one of two robotic rovers that are used in our Search for Life Beyond Earth exhibition. The rovers were built by the Beatty sisters–Camille and Genevieve–along with their father, Robert. The Genevieve rover, along with other robots the family created, were setup in the Grand Foyer of the President’s residence where guests could get a closeup view of the rover and see it in action. Some guests, including rapper will.i.am, even got to take over the rover’s controls and drive it around the Grand Foyer.

See photos from the exciting day on the Beatty Robotics blog here.
 

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Robert Moses’ cheerleading for an expanded Hall of Science was matched by Mayor Lindsay on May 31, 1967, when he announced a $10 million City commitment for a new building to be built within 14 months.

The five-story addition would house 190,000 square feet of exhibit, laboratory, and training space. The centerpiece would be the first publicly accessible atomarium, a nuclear reactor where scientists and educators could conduct research and give demonstrations to the public. In a basement laboratory, students could collect protons, neutrons and gamma rays. Museum visitors would be able to watch from a 150-seat auditorium, peering down into a 23-foot pool of water, beneath which was submerged blue glowing reactor.

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The New York Times assured readers that the reactor “is also equipped with a built-in safety device that acts on the principle of a thermostat—if things get too hot, it shuts itself off.”

Funded by the Atomic Energy Commission, the atomarium, according to Lindsay, “in turn should act as a magnet for commercial and industrial developers.”

High hopes. Big plans. An ambitious timeline. The planners of the Hall of Science expansion had their funding in place. Up next, City administrative bureaucracy awaited.

 

Read more about the history of the New York Hall of Science in the NYSCI Archives.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Fifteen teaching residents were tinkering at Design Lab today as part of a program called MASTER – Math and Science Teacher Residency Program. MASTER is a collaboration between NYSCI, Hunter College, and New Visions for Public Schools and is funded by the National Science Foundation. The two-year program trains high school math and science teaching candidates in hands-on classroom experiences that ignite students’ interest in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM).

By experimenting with Design Lab activities, the teacher residents will see, first hand, how the design and engineering process can help students learn STEM concepts. They will then use the Design Lab activities to think about possible lessons and learning activities that can be created for classroom use. The two-year MASTER program also includes coursework, training for interpreting and monitoring data, and community engagement. Once certified, the 15 teacher residents will be placed in schools throughout New York City.

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. DUE-1238157.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

In late May, 20 high school students spent a Saturday at NYSCI conducting hands-on activities for museum visitors. Activities included a self-inflating balloon, dry ice bubbles, elephant toothpaste and more.

The event was part of an apprenticeship program with ExpandEd called Scientific Inquiry as a Time Machine. The first half of the program ran in the spring and involved students practicing techniques and strategies for implementing engaging activities at informal learning locations such as museums. The second half of the program will consist of a summer internship where students will work as counselors at NYSCI summer camps and programs or at other sites around New York City.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

NYSCI has partnered with Hudson River Park to bring a free science festival to New York City residents. SUBMERGE! NYC Marine Science Festival is a daylong festival devoted to understanding our coastal waters. This inspiring day of interactive science will take place on the waterfront in lower Manhattan, at Hudson River Park’s Pier 26, on Sunday October 5 from 11 am – 3 pm. City residents and visitors alike will be invited to Pier 26 for a unique opportunity to engage directly with scientists and other professionals to experience first-hand the cutting-edge science, technology and engineering responsible for helping us to better understand, conserve and restore our ocean and connected waterways.

The SUBMERGE! NYC Marine Science Festival will include:

  • Research Stations: Noted scientists representing local and national groups will present current research through hands-on demonstrations, interactive experiments and invitations to participate in citizen science.
  • Science Lounge: Featuring key talks and panel discussions on notable topics.
  • Sustainable Seafood Café: Local, sustainable seafood organizations will provide both food and engaging discussions about seafood.
  • River Rangers Exploratorium: An area dedicated to reaching a younger audience.
  • Music, catch and release fishing, river kayaking and more enriching activities for all to enjoy.