Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

As a young girl, Shannon wanted to invent a bus-boat-plane to provide transportation for people with disabilities. At that time, she didn’t realize that design and philanthropy would be a part of her life.

Now she works at the New York Hall of Science as a Design Lab Resident. Where she exposes youth to the basics of design. Her work helps increase interest in engineering.


Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

The NYSCI Archive: Rediscovering 50 years of stories about a science museum and its City.

 

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

The hurried renovations to the Hall of Science immediately following the World’s Fair notwithstanding, the New York Times was not wrong in 1966 to call it “not yet a true museum.”

Rather than an intentionally curated exhibit presentation, the Hall of Science offered a collection of World’s Fair holdovers supplemented by an assembly of corporate-sponsored exhibits. An exhibition from Con Edison told about pre-electricity New York and also showed a model of a modern-day nuclear power plant. New York Telephone’s exhibit celebrated Bell Labs while NASA’s exhibit looked “like a traveling display used to sell the public on various aspects of the NASA program, rather than the methodical, beautifully conceived presentation that should go into a great museum.”

The Atomic Energy Commission exhibit from the World’s Fair also remained on display. Atomsville, U.S.A., invited schoolchildren to conduct simulated atomic experiments while their parents and teachers watched on closed-circuit televisions since adults weren’t allowed in the child-sized exhibit. Kids could prospect for uranium, operate remote-controlled “safety hands,” start an atomic chain reaction, and step on a scale that told the number of atoms in their bodies.

Photo: The Stars and Stripes, February 3, 1967

Alongside Atomsville, U.S.A., was the Life Science Radiation Laboratory where millipedes ate radioactive leaves so that visitors could trace the passage of food through their digestive systems. There was also Rupert the rat, who had a crook in the tip of his tail resulting from a controlled dose of radiation given to his mother during pregnancy. Another exhibit showed irradiated foods that were left at room temperature for months, yet still remained “edible and tasty.”

All of these exhibits were on view in the lower level of the Hall of Science in what’s now called the Central Pavilion. Upstairs, Rendezvous in Space, another World’s Fair holdover continued in the Great Hall. Rendezvous in Space began with a film (Frank Capra’s last) narrated by Danny Thomas, featuring (uncredited) voices by Mel Blanc. The presentation culminated with a live demonstration of a docking by a “space taxi” carrying a three-man relief crew to a model space station suspended 80-feet above the ground. When the relief crew entered the station, the lights went up and the crowds cheered.

See all posts in the NYSCI Archive.

 

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

This fascinating “making of” video created by SITU Studio (architects for Design Lab), Surveying the Great Hall captures the impressive scaffolding used in the restoration of the “Cathedral of Science.” As their custom camera rig slowly lifts 70 feet from floor to ceiling, “the camera will be slowly rotating and tilting to survey the space with a corkscrew motion.”

View their complete blog post here.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

This photo shows Flushing Meadow in 1967. The Hall of Science is in the foreground. The Heliport, now Terrace on the Park, is adjacent. The Queens Zoo has not yet been built. Across the Grand Central Parkway from the Hall of Science, the Federal Pavilion and the Singer Bowl sit at the present-day site of the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center.  Photo via www.nywf64.com.

 

See all posts in the NYSCI Archive.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

The Master of Ceremonies at the September 1966 opening of the Hall of Science was John R. Dunning, president of the Hall’s Board of Trustees, and Dean of Columbia’s School of Engineering and Applied Science. Dunning had worked on the Manhattan Project and built Columbia’s first cyclotron. (Atomic energy was a central theme in the early Hall of Science exhibits and the Atomic Energy Commission an key collaborator, thanks to “Ray” Dunning.)

Among the distinguished guests he welcomed that day were Mayor John Lindsay; Robert Moses; Queens Borough President, Mario Cariello; Wilfred Johnson, Commissioner of the Atomic Energy Commission; Robert Jastrow, director of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies; Major General Marvin Demler, commander of the Research and Technology Division of the Air Force Systems Command; and Jacob Zack, a director of New York City Board of Education;

John R. Dunning

John R. Dunning

The Star-Spangled Banner was played by the Department of Sanitation Band. And as the New Yorker noted, “a priest, a minister and a rabbi offered an invocation, a blessing and a benediction, respectively, at strategic points in the program.”

From the podium, speakers referred to the Hall as “the existing structure,” as a not-so-subtle way of reminding everyone that the Hall of Science was not yet complete. More construction (and fundraising) was still to be done. Although the Hall of Science was planned as a permanent museum, the facility was not easily converted from a Fair pavilion. A New York Times review declared it “not yet a true museum” but a “leftover” building “ill-suited to serve, by itself, as a museum.” With a “cavernous basement” full of “Fair holdovers.” A 1967 report by the City Planning Commission termed the Hall’s exhibit collection a “hodgepodge.”

The dedication of the Hall of Science took place “on the day of the heaviest rainfall since 1903,” and there was already a leak in the roof of the Great Hall. Still, tens of thousands of visitors would come to the Hall of Science each month and big plans for expansion had been under consideration since even before the World’s Fair opened.  More on those plans in future posts.

See all posts in the NYSCI Archive.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

The Science Career Ladder doesn’t always take Explainers on a path to Science. In Todd’s story, working at the New York Hall of Science whipped him into shape and boosted his confidence to a level where he will succeed in any career.


Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

To increase student learning, new reform initiatives are emphasizing connections between and among STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) subjects. But there has been little research on how best to integrate the subjects or what factors would make this approach most successful.

A new report released by the National Academy of Engineering and National Research Council reviews this issue and offers recommendations for a research agenda to advance our understanding of integrated STEM education. NYSCI President and CEO Margaret Honey, who co-wrote the report, said “the potential for fostering the natural connections among the four STEM subjects for the benefit of students is exciting. By guiding the future efforts of teachers, practitioners and others who are focused on STEM education, this report can help improve integrated approaches to STEM learning.”

 

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

 

The NYSCI Archive: Rediscovering 50 years of stories about a science museum and its City.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Formative Fish Tests

The first focus test on January 31st asked visitors at the museum:

  • Gender
  • Age
  1. Which 5 animal designs do you like the best?
  2. If you were fishing, which 5 animals would you be most upset to catch?
  3. Which animals shown exist in real life? Pick all that apply.

 

On the table in front of the visitors were the following pictures of 56 animals:

 

 

A total number of 24 children were surveyed (18 females, 6 males) with an average age of 11. From the data collected, several animals were excluded from the next focus test.

 

For the second focus test on February 6th, it was decided to survey the children in a different, more hands-on way. Poker chips of different colors were used to answer preference questions about the fish.

 

The second focus test asked the visitors at the museum to:

  1. Put a white poker chip on the animals you would like to see in an aquarium.
  2. Put a red chip on the animals that if you were to catch one of the fish, which ones you would like to show off to your friends/family.

 

On the table in front of the visitors were the following pictures of 40 animals with spaces for the poker chips next to every animal:

A total number of 49 children were surveyed. The results are as follows:

Fish White Chip (Which would you like to see in an aquarium?) Red Chip (Which would you like to show off?)
1 7 5
2 10 4
3 9 4
4 6 8
5 11 5
6 7 4
7 27 7
8 10 5
9 13 11
10 6 3
11 6 4
12 4 7
13 7 4
14 6 3
15 6 3
16 10 3
17 7 5
18 2 6
19 1 7
20 10 2
21 13 8
22 6 3
23 9 5
24 5 4
25 8 4
26 9 2
27 4 3
28 7 4
29 9 4
30 9 9
31 7 1
32 7 2
33 14 5
34 4 3
35 12 11
36 4 3
37 12 10
38 13 2
39 6 6
40 7 2

 

 

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

The interactive table top has arrived! The developers at the Learning Games Network are working on the interface.

More images to come!

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

This Atomic World was a lecture and demonstration exhibit produced by the Atomic Energy Commission. From the late 1940s all the way through the 1970s, This Atomic World mobile units visited schools, universities and museums across the US.  This photo is from a visit to the Hall of Science circa 1967. About 1.6 million students in 30 states saw This Atomic World that year.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Celebrating 50 years since the Hall of Science opened at the 1964-65 World’s Fair, we have launched the NYSCI Archive. We’ll share a half century of memories: how the Hall of Science came to be and became what it is today. We’ll see how the Hall almost met its end and how Yankee Stadium was to blame. We’ll meet the heroes and heroines who brought us back from the brink.  We’ll rediscover a history that features nuclear reactors, paper airplanes, pipe bombs, pop stars, tornado sculptures, and more than one science circus among other things.

Unlike most of the World’s Fair pavilions, the Hall of Science was always intended to live on as a permanent museum. After a year of refurbishments, on September 21, 1966, with dedicatory speeches from Mayor Lindsay and Robert Moses, the Hall of Science had the first of what would turn out to be several re-openings. And in a scene that became commonplace around the Hall, grown-ups gave speeches while schoolchildren headed straight for the exhibits.

As the New York Times recounted it:

“Even as more than 200 official guests were upstairs in the cathedral-like concrete-and-blue glass building downing their catered cocktails and stand-up lunch following the ceremonies, children from seven city schools were joyously trying out exhibits on the ground floor.”

More about the exhibits, the opening ceremonies, the unceremonious weather, and those catered cocktail-sipping guests in future posts. For now, the last word goes to Robert Moses. We’ve uncovered more than a few dedicatory speeches and articles from the early years of the Hall of Science. A tendency toward exuberance was prevalent in those post-Fair days, and these remarks are certainly of that era in several ways:

“Here we shall teach the smallest child to enjoy the toys of science instead of Montessori blocks, the teen-ager to substitute computers for Beatles, women to plan for atomic housekeeping and men for hobbies to beguile leisure, the clergy to lift their eyes above the hills and conventional heavens to the planets and limitless space, and statesmen to beat swords into ploughshares. The Old Romans on such occasions used to say ‘Quod felix austumque sit’ which translated into the vernacular, meant ‘May this dedication be a happy augury of future triumphs.”

 

The image at top of this post is the logo of the Hall of Science of the City of New York, from the late 1960s – early 1970s.

See all posts in the NYSCI Archive here.

 

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

NYSCI has just produced an iBook that will change how you view the role of science in the legal system.

False Conviction: Innocence, Guilt & Science focuses on real cases in which eyewitness accounts, confessions and crime lab tests led to false convictions, and where DNA evidence helped exonerate the innocent. It includes interactive experiences where you can examine DNA in blood, hair and semen, match a bullet to the gun that fired it, explore crime scene photos, and more. NYSCI collaborated with the Innocence Project and Touch Press to produce the interactive iBook, which is written by Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Jim Dwyer.

False Conviction was designed for use on an iPad and is available at the iBooks store.

Packed with incredible interactive experiences, False Conviction features interviews with leading homicide detectives, lawyers and eye witnesses who helped identify the mistakes that were made and free the wrongly convicted. See the science for yourself in simulations and videos that invite readers to dig into the evidence, read court transcripts and explore the science that freed the wrongly convicted.

How confident would you be as an eye-witness? Try one of the interactives from False Conviction:

“False Conviction puts the criminal justice system under the microscope and reveals its flaws in shocking detail. Through compelling writing and interactive features that transport you to crime scenes, court rooms and cutting edge science labs, Pulitzer-winning author Jim Dwyer and the imaginative book makers at Touch Press illustrate through heartbreaking cases of wrongful convictions why the system fails and how science is helping to restore justice.”  – John Grisham
“Jim Dwyer’s new book is a revelation. I feel I’ve not only seen the future, but am immersed in the details of these tragic cases of false convictions. Dwyer has a legitimate moral outrage and a superb journalistic conscience, which together with this exciting hands-on technology, puts the reader into the heart of the dilemma, reviewing documents and evidence, pouring over photographs, hearing from the experts. The cumulative effect is stunning and infuriating.” – Ken Burns