Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

It takes a lot of work – and a lot of people – to make a new museum exhibit. Peggy Monahan is one of the people behind our new Design Lab exhibition opening in June, where museum visitors can engage in activities, experiments and challenges.

Peggy, the exhibits projects creative director at NYSCI, was recently interviewed for Hand to Hand, the quarterly journal of the Association of Children’s Museums. In the article, she explains what she does: “I’m an educator and an experience designer, and my medium is exhibitions. I don’t design exhibit furniture or come up with colors or graphics. I arrange experiences, crafting them into what I hope will be transformative experiences that become implanted in people’s lives.”

Read more about Peggy in the Hand to Hand article “In Support of Things that Live in the Cracks.” And get ready to experience Design Lab this June!

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

MakeScape

Museum interactive game exhibit and research project Overview

A project in collaboration with Matthew Berland of UW Madison, Leilah Lyons of New York Hall of Science and Learning Games Network (Madison developer).

Object of game is to attract different “fish” to the variety of light combinations that you can create when learning how to build a simple circuit.

Learn about electrical engineering by creating simple circuits using 4 components.

  •  LEDs (Red, Green & Blue)
  •  Batteries (voltage)
  •  Resistors (ohms)
  •  Capacitor (light blink)

Learn reasoning by attracting marine animals to lights turned on by creating a simple circuit.

Players interact with a 55 inch multi-touch tabletop screen. The electrical components are physical “blocks” that the player places on the table which become the virtual electrical components in the table screen. Players assemble these “blocks”/virtual components in a proper circuit to make the virtual LEDs work which results in a “fish” swimming up to the light.

Age Group:

Middle school kids and up.

Learning Goals:

Understanding of simple circuitry.

Understanding of electrical symbology and diagrams

Reasoning – around what light combinations will lure what kind of aquatic animal.

Use a combinations of components to light one or many different color LEDs.

Up to 4 Players on a multi-touch screen tabletop, connect the electrical components in a circuit to light the LEDs. Single player activities with opportunities for cooperative play and social interaction while players are at the tabletop screen.

Background story:

A cavern with an underground lake was discovered in Central America. The lake is filled with exotic never before seen marine animals. Biologists are cataloging these new aquatic species and are filming them using a submersible camera in the lake. The biologists discovered that these marine animals are attracted to red, blue and green lights in a variety of combinations. From a remote location you will help lure the creatures to the camera (to be filmed) by creating a combination of colored lights on a tabletop screen. The screen is the view from the camera looking down into the lake. Electrical components are on the tabletop for you to create the colored lights and lure these exotic marine animals to the cameraexample of view from camera and tabletop screen.