Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

IDC 2013 Design, Make, Play from IDC2013 Conference on Vimeo.

NYSCI participated in this featured presentation at the Interactive Design for Children conference at the New School last month, with an overview of the Design Make Play initiative.

Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development, and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design, Make, Play. The defining characteristics of Design, Make, Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Meet Camille, NYSCI’s new Mars Rover. Named after one of her creators, Camille was built by the Beatty sisters–Camille and Genevieve–along with their father, Robert at the headquarters of Beatty Robotics a.k.a the workshop in the garage of their home in Ashville, NC.

Video won’t load?  Watch it here. We met the Beattys while researching upgrades to the Mars Rover exhibit in The Search for Life Beyond Earth. Over the past several months, they worked with our Exhibits team to build, test and install the Rover as a permanent feature at NYSCI. Here’s a description courtesy of Beatty Robotics’ project blog:

The Mars Rover is constructed of over 500 electrical components and aluminum parts that we purchase, make by hand, and/or machine on our homemade CNC Mill. In addition to the NASA-style six-wheeled rocker-bogie suspension system and the solar panels, the new Mars Rover is equipped with an infrared camera, a thermal array sensor, eight sonar sensors, and other technology. Using special control software that we will provide, kids and other visitors to the center will drive the Mars Rover remotely through the exhibit’s Mars-scape on a mission to find infrared-emitting rocks that may provide evidence of past life on Mars.

What’s next for the Beattys? They are already at work on a second Mars Rover for us–this one dubbed Genevieve, of course. And they just competed work on a replica of a Soviet-era Lunokhod moon rover for a museum in Prague.   NYSCI’s New Rover on GMA Live

Check out a profile by Andrew Terranova on MAKE

See an interview with the Beattys on NBC.com & Venture Beat:  Check out the Mars Rover These Girls Built in Their Garage