Background

Since its founding at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) has inspired millions of people—children, teachers, and families– by offering creative, participatory ways to learn and encouraging people to explore their curiosity and nurture their creativity. Located in Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the country, NYSCI welcomes 500,000 visitors each year and serves thousands more through outreach in schools, teacher professional development and participation in a variety of public events and research initiatives.

NYSCI is a leader in the science museum field, recognized for its highly regarded exhibitions, programs, and products, all of which are informed by strategies of engagement called Design-Make-Play. The defining characteristics of Design-Make-Play — open-ended exploration, imaginative learning, personal relevance, deep engagement, and delight — are the ingredients that inspire passionate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learners. NYSCI engages diverse communities of learners, particularly young people, in STEM, by fostering the excitement of self-directed exploration and by tapping into the joy of learning intrinsic in young people’s play. Our transformative model for STEM exploration invites broad participation and makes engagement and learning irresistible.

NYSCI has approximately 120 full-time and over 180 part-time staff members.

About the Position

Last night was the first of six sold-out concerts by Björk, premiering her new project Biophilia. following sold-out residencies in Manchester (UK) and Reykjavik (Iceland) in 2011, the NYSCI residency will be followed by four shows at Roseland Ballroom in Manhattan, from February 6 through March 2, 2012.

Björk collaborated with app developers, scientists, writers, inventors, musicians and instrument makers during the production of Biophilia. The result is a unique multimedia exploration of the universe and its physical forces – particularly those where music, nature and technology meet. The project explores the relationships between musical structures and natural phenomena.

Among those posting reactions to the opening performance is Rolling Stone’s David Fricke, who was struck by the Great Hall as “an eerie windowless space with a cathedral-high ceiling and irregularly curved walls that suggest convulsive ripples in time and space.”

Read more here.